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Hurricane Lane

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Lane have now downgraded to Cat 3 now.

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WTPA32 PHFO 240555
TCPCP2
 
BULLETIN
Hurricane Lane Intermediate Advisory Number 38A
NWS Central Pacific Hurricane Center Honolulu HI   EP142018
800 PM HST Thu Aug 23 2018
 
...DANGEROUS HURRICANE LANE MOVING NORTH TOWARD THE MAIN HAWAIIAN
ISLANDS...
 
 
SUMMARY OF 800 PM HST...0600 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...18.0N 157.9W
ABOUT 170 MI...280 KM SW OF KAILUA-KONA HAWAII
ABOUT 230 MI...370 KM S OF HONOLULU HAWAII
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...120 MPH...195 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...N OR 350 DEGREES AT 6 MPH...9 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...959 MB...28.32 INCHES
 
 
WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:
 
None.
 
SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:
 
A Hurricane Warning is in effect for...
* Oahu
* Maui County...including the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and
Kahoolawe
 
A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* Hawaii County
 
A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...
* Kauai County...including the islands of Kauai and Niihau
 
A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected
somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and
property should be rushed to completion.
 
A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area.
 
A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area.
 
Interests in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands should monitor
the progress of Hurricane Lane.
 
For storm information specific to your area, please monitor
products issued by the National Weather Service office in
Honolulu Hawaii.
 
 
DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
----------------------
At 800 PM HST (0600 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Lane was located by
radar and satellite imagery near latitude 18.0 North, longitude
157.9 West. Lane is moving toward the north near 6 mph (9 km/h). A
slow general northward motion is expected to continue through
Friday. A turn toward the west is anticipated Saturday and Sunday,
with an increase in forward speed. On the forecast track, the center
of Lane will move over, or dangerously close to portions of the main
Hawaiian islands later tonight and Friday.
 
Maximum sustained winds are near 120 mph (195 km/h) with higher
gusts. Lane is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson
Hurricane Wind Scale. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48
hours, but Lane is expected to remain a hurricane as it approaches
the islands.
 
Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from
the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125
miles (205 km).
 
The estimated minimum central pressure is 959 mb (28.32 inches).
 
 
HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
WIND: Tropical storm conditions are already occurring on the Big
Island and parts of Maui County. These conditions will likely
persist tonight. Hurricane conditions are expected over some areas
of Maui County on Friday. Tropical storm conditions are expected to
begin on Oahu later tonight, with hurricane conditions expected from
Friday into Friday night. Tropical storm or hurricane conditions are
possible on Kauai on Saturday.
 
RAINFALL: Rain bands will continue to overspread the Hawaiian
Islands well ahead of Lane. Excessive rainfall associated with this
slow moving hurricane will continue to impact the Hawaiian Islands
into the weekend, leading to significant and life-threatening flash
flooding and landslides. Lane is expected to produce total rain
accumulations of 10 to 20 inches, with localized amounts of 30 to 40
inches possible over portions of the Hawaiian Islands. Over two feet
of rain has already fallen at a couple of locations on the windward
side of the Big Island.
 
SURF: Very large swells generated by the slow moving hurricane will
severely impact the Hawaiian Islands over the next couple of days.
These swells will produce extremely large and damaging surf along
exposed west and south facing shorelines. A prolonged period of high
surf will likely lead to significant coastal erosion.
 
STORM SURGE: The combination of a dangerous storm surge and large
breaking waves will raise water levels by as much as 2 to 4 feet
above normal tide levels along south and west facing shores near
the center of Lane. The surge will be accompanied by large and
destructive waves.
 
 
NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
Next complete advisory at 1100 PM HST.
 
$$
Forecaster Houston

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Heres the good live coverage of Hurricane Lane

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Posted (edited)

 

Edited by knocker

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Miriam won't trouble Hawaii 

Pacific Ocean storms Typhoon Jebi forecast to reach southern Honshu, Japan on Tues. Hurricane Miriam heading north and Hurricane Norman stormin' to major hurricane status well out at sea.

3008pacific.png

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