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Storm Doris - Atlantic Storm 4


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This is a close call - go to about 25 seconds in.  

One positive then.

METEOSAT airmass imagery frames for today show  nicely the development from frontal wave into a depression, with baroclinic leaf forming as dry air intrusion (in red) originating from the lower strato

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2 minutes ago, chrisbell-nottheweatherman said:

One wonders as to the wisdom of running them on north-south routes in weather like this.

That area is very exposed on the routes they run them buses along especially towards Lynn, I would have thought they would stop running double deckerd today.. 

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Just catching up with the latest, winds finally subsided here past midday and it was a quick transition from the 70mph gusts back down to less damaging 30mph gusts. Overheard a few pilots chatting with the Manchester approach-controller talking about what kind of weather was going on and I think out of the 7 holding at the time 3 choose alternate airfields given the 45kt slight-crosswind component.

Lincolnshire and Norfolk now getting their fair-share of the gusts but thankfully for everyone the worst of the winds will be gone and out across the southern North Sea by early evening.

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11 minutes ago, chillyblast said:

So is this it for the storms in the visible forecasting future or is there another one roaring in off the atlantic like a couple of years ago? hopefully not!

Saturday, although not as strong, them 3rd March according to GFS

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2 minutes ago, matty40s said:

Saturday, although not as strong, them 3rd March according to GFS

Joy - its starting to get like an extremely watered down version of hurricane alley in the south almost every year, need to swap the fence panels for titanium panels.

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2 hours ago, Nick F said:

81 mph gust at Weybourne in Norfolk, unusually strong gusts for this far south

gusts.thumb.JPG.a5cb38a865c32c832866e55e2354233b.JPG

 

I don't lnow whether you know Weybourne and the surrounding district, but it is quite exposed, being on some higher ground on the inland edge of the coastal low-lying marshes and beaches.

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12 minutes ago, chrisbell-nottheweatherman said:

Am I seeing squall lines in the ppn. on Netweather radar?

I think they're just aligned bands of showers, Chris.

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2 minutes ago, chrisbell-nottheweatherman said:

Not wishing to sound sarcastic, as I don't intend it as such, but isn't that pretty much the same thing?:cc_confused::D

A squall line would be associated with a vigorous cold front. The bands of showers are just part of Doris' circulation - possibly a trough. :)

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Just now, Mapantz said:

A squall line would be associated with a vigorous cold front. The bands of showers are just part of Doris' circulation - possibly a trough. :)

Good point - thanks.  I seem to recall a trough was indicated on this morning's FAX chart.:D

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23 minutes ago, chrisbell-nottheweatherman said:

Am I seeing squall lines in the ppn. on Netweather radar?

They are just showers lining up in the flow. Gusty showers often get described as squally, like windy weather is called stormy. 

Squall

(SQ) A squall is differentiated from a gust by its greater duration: generally lasting for several minutes before decaying again. Squalls are often associated with the passage of fronts, particularly cold fronts, or well defined troughs, or with the 'gust front' from a well defined/mature supercell Cb. To qualify as a line squall, other marked changes are often observed, e.g. change of wind direction, fall of temperature etc. The following definition is used when estimating wind speeds using the Beaufort scale of wind speed: ".... a sudden increase of wind speed by at least three levels of the Beaufort scale, the speed rising to F6 or more and lasting for at least one minute."

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The overturned double-decker bus at Wisbech this afternoon, Fifteen people were treated at the scene and 11 taken to hospital with minor injuries.

Untitled.thumb.jpg.ad320b8a95bc37431966518c1ad6440a.jpg

 

Edited by SNOW_JOKE
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Well an interesting walk to work earlier. Debris everywhere, bins blown over, loads of garden fences completely blown down, bits of roof flying off... The doctors had to close for that reason. Trees down also. Wild. 

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