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The changing daylight hours thread


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Posted
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)
  • Weather Preferences: Unseasonably cold weather (at all times of year), wind, and thunderstorms.
  • Location: Edinburgh (previously Chelmsford and Birmingham)

    Just like to point out that some people get SAD the other way (depression in Summer). Anyone remember laserguy?

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    Happens twice every year (March and September) near where I live, the sunsets between two trees. These two sunsets, 11 1/2 years apart March 2009 Last evening

    Well guess what LG, some of us here suffer from SAD so I can't tell you how much that can affect your mood and how much better daylight can make you feel. Need I remind you how much you complain about

    You think? We get these same stories and debates every single year but nothing ever changes.   Long live GMT!

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    Posted
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hoar Frost, Snow, Misty Autumn mornings
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL

    Just like to point out that some people get SAD the other way (depression in Summer). Anyone remember laserguy?

     

    It's nearly time for him to emerge:

     

    Living-in-a-sewer.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds
  • Weather Preferences: snow, heat, thunderstorms
  • Location: Leeds

    Nothing to do with Vit D.   The players are melotonin (a hormone) and serotonin (a neurotransmitter).  Melotonin basically controls our circadian cycle, keeps us awake during the day and encourages sleep at night.  Serotonin is one of the main neurotransmitters in the brain, and low levels of serotonin are known to be behind "normal" clinical depression as well as SAD. The alternative meaning of SAD is Seasonally Affected Depression.

     

    The "cure"? There isn't one.  We are basically a tropical species and not designed for the awful sunless British climate.  Some can handle British conditions, but those of us at the other end of the spectrum suffer the effects of SAD, and with our increasingly cloudy skies SAD often manifests for most of the year.

     

    In order of practicality, a.) St. John's Wort is a natural serotonin booster, useful if you don't want to take b.)selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like fluoxetine (Prozac) or c.) use a light box (I've seen them for as little as £35).

     

    WARNING: Don't take St. John's Wort together with SSRIs as doing so could lead to serotonin syndrome which is potentially fatal. 

     

    NICE recommends that SAD should be treated in the same way as other types of depression.  In other words, SAD is an actual illness.

    Most people don't suffer from SAD - and to the best of my knowledge, nobody I know suffers from it. Most people just continue as normal. Lack of sunlight can be annoying at times, but for most of us, it's a mild nuisance rather than a cause for severe depression.

    Edited by cheese
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    Posted
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.
  • Location: Derbyshire Peak District South Pennines Middleton & Smerrill Tops 305m (1001ft) asl.

    I realy enjoy the dark months. It adds to the joy of the Winter season.

    Edited by Polar Maritime
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    Posted
  • Location: Near Romford Essex.
  • Location: Near Romford Essex.

    Nothing to do with Vit D.   The players are melotonin (a hormone) and serotonin (a neurotransmitter).  Melotonin basically controls our circadian cycle, keeps us awake during the day and encourages sleep at night.  Serotonin is one of the main neurotransmitters in the brain, and low levels of serotonin are known to be behind "normal" clinical depression as well as SAD. The alternative meaning of SAD is Seasonally Affected Depression.

     

    The "cure"? There isn't one.  We are basically a tropical species and not designed for the awful sunless British climate.  Some can handle British conditions, but those of us at the other end of the spectrum suffer the effects of SAD, and with our increasingly cloudy skies SAD often manifests for most of the year.

     

    In order of practicality, a.) St. John's Wort is a natural serotonin booster, useful if you don't want to take b.)selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like fluoxetine (Prozac) or c.) use a light box (I've seen them for as little as £35).

     

    WARNING: Don't take St. John's Wort together with SSRIs as doing so could lead to serotonin syndrome which is potentially fatal. 

     

    NICE recommends that SAD should be treated in the same way as other types of depression.  In other words, SAD is an actual illness.

     

    I'm surprised anyone is still sane if they live in the northern latitudes, British climate ( seasonal darkness and cloudy weather) must be nothing compared to months of darkness way oop north, those people seem to have adjusted pretty well (being a world away from the tropics) lets face it they have lived and thrived there for thousands of years.............................

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    I'm surprised anyone is still sane if they live in the northern latitudes, British climate ( seasonal darkness and cloudy weather) must be nothing compared to months of darkness way oop north, those people seem to have adjusted pretty well (being a world away from the tropics) lets face it they have lived and thrived there for thousands of years.............................

    is anyone sane in the northern latitudes???;)..
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    Posted
  • Location: Runcorn New Town 60m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Sunny and blisteringly hot
  • Location: Runcorn New Town 60m ASL

    Most people don't suffer from SAD - and to the best of my knowledge, nobody I know suffers from it. Most people just continue as normal. Lack of sunlight can be annoying at times, but for most of us, it's a mild nuisance rather than a cause for severe depression.

    Really? Do you have the data to back that up? Your knowledge is obviously inadequate. I suffer from it so know what I'm talking about, and I know others who suffer from it.  The information I gave in my post isn't learned by using Google, I have a scientific background and have researched into matters such as the causes of SAD as well the biological mechanisms that let me withstand extreme cold without harm. Severe SAD can lead to suicidal ideation - it can be that bad, and necessitates medical intervention.   As I've said when you last criticised me, you don't have to read my posts nor reply to them.

     

    Edited by Wildswimmer Pete
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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    Most people don't suffer from SAD - and to the best of my knowledge, nobody I know suffers from it. Most people just continue as normal. Lack of sunlight can be annoying at times, but for most of us, it's a mild nuisance rather than a cause for severe depression.

    It is a well understood disorder and well accepted,just the same as all those who probably stress at long daylight in summer.Some people have it bad and others mild,have long thought I suffer a little myself as I don't really like the closing autumn months yet like it better into the new year but that may have a bearing on cold ,xmas ,length of time to warmer weather and getting older !

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    Light really pulling in now especially on a morning but evenings will start to extend in just over 9 weeks !

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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl

    Yes we are loosing light rapidly at the moment, very noticeable under cloud and rain, though we haven't seen many such evenings and will continue to be spared such ones for the time being.

     

    The major chance though is still 2 and half weeks away, that first evening after the clocks go back is always a major shock, and marks a major change in the general feel of things.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
  • Weather Preferences: Over 18C please!
  • Location: Ashford, Kent

    ........................................ but evenings will start to extend in just over 9 weeks !

     

    In other words it'll be 4 and a bit weeks 'til we're back to where we are today - which doesn't sound quite as good :sorry:

    Still there's Christmad to get through first :yahoo:

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    Posted
  • Location: Keyingham, East Yorkshire
  • Weather Preferences: Spanish plumes, hot and sunny with thunderstorms
  • Location: Keyingham, East Yorkshire

    Light really pulling in now especially on a morning but evenings will start to extend in just over 9 weeks !

     

    Mid December is the turning point for evenings and when the distraction of Christmas and New Year dies down its already noticeable.

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    Posted
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
  • Weather Preferences: Winter: Cold & Snowy, Summer: Just not hot
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

    Mid December is the turning point for evenings and when the distraction of Christmas and New Year dies down its already noticeable.

     

    Is it though? Sunset is only about 10 minutes later by January than mid-Dec.

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    Posted
  • Location: Keyingham, East Yorkshire
  • Weather Preferences: Spanish plumes, hot and sunny with thunderstorms
  • Location: Keyingham, East Yorkshire

    Is it though? Sunset is only about 10 minutes later by January than mid-Dec.

     

    im trained in this sort of thing though Nick because i pay so much attention :D Being able to see the setting sun from my window across flat land does help.

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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m

    Is it though? Sunset is only about 10 minutes later by January than mid-Dec.

    If you work outside and need light those ten minutes are priceless!

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    Posted
  • Location: Runcorn New Town 60m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Sunny and blisteringly hot
  • Location: Runcorn New Town 60m ASL

    Is it though? Sunset is only about 10 minutes later by January than mid-Dec.

    The change of daylight hours roughly follows a sine curve with the fastest daily rate of gaining/losing daylight occurs when crossing the equinoxes.  At the solstices the rate of change is only a matter of a few minutes each week for about 3 weeks either side.  At my latitude (53deg) I only notice the days getting longer in early February (Imbolc or Candlemas)

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    Posted
  • Location: Truro, Cornwall
  • Weather Preferences: Winter - Heavy Snow Summer - Hot with Night time Thunderstorms
  • Location: Truro, Cornwall

    Still very pleasant in the sun though. :D

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    So we are now back in GMT which means its 8 weeks and 2 days till the shortest day and then the whole process begins again

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    Posted
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
  • Weather Preferences: Winter: Cold & Snowy, Summer: Just not hot
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

    It was lovely this morning getting into work in the light. I think this is the aspect that those in favour of year-round BST forget, winter mornings would be pretty bleak. It's difficult enough waking up first thing in the morning, let alone if it was dark until gone 9am, probably closer to 10am on overcast days!

    Edited by Nick L
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    Posted
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
  • Weather Preferences: Winter: Cold & Snowy, Summer: Just not hot
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

    I'm quite strange as I'm the other way around. The dark mornings never bother me - in fact I honestly wouldn't care if it was nearly dark at 10:00, but the dark evenings I find really depressing on the other hand. In December, it is not rare for light to feel like it's dimming by 15:00.

     

    Fair enough. But then again, I'll be complaining on Wednesday morning when I'm getting home from a night shift with the sun up!

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Turkey has not changed its clocks like other countries due to the up and coming polls the change will happen at 04:00 on 8th November.

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