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Storm and Convective Discussion 10th June Onwards


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I just about cope when it's not overhead, say 4+ miles away and I know it's going by, or as I say to the Mrs, it's not our storm, but any closer and I do really panic... I haven't even got a tv aerial! 

Got freesat, as a kid, was led to believe that tv's on, via aerial made the aerial a prime lightning rod, so if a storm got anywhere near, tv went off, aerial unplugged from tv, and it didn't go back on until the storm was completely gone, and I mean gone!!! 

What do you lot do at home precaution wise when a storm gets close.... Anything? 

My dad was always mega cautious with the TV aerial also, he used to unplug it from the back of the tv everytime a storm was close by.

 

To be honest, up to the age of 12/13 i was terrified of storms, it was only when my school caught a direct hit from what must have been a +CG, completely out of the blue, that i started to really get a passion for severe weather.

 

But right now i don't do any preparation at home as im usually of out in the car as soon as i get any word of an approaching storm, and we no longer have a tv aerial! :p 

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I just about cope when it's not overhead, say 4+ miles away and I know it's going by, or as I say to the Mrs, it's not our storm, but any closer and I do really panic... I haven't even got a tv aerial! 

Got freesat, as a kid, was led to believe that tv's on, via aerial made the aerial a prime lightning rod, so if a storm got anywhere near, tv went off, aerial unplugged from tv, and it didn't go back on until the storm was completely gone, and I mean gone!!! 

What do you lot do at home precaution wise when a storm gets close.... Anything? 

 

Pc and TV were both connected as was the internet last night during the storm, didn't disconnect anything apart from my iPhone that was on charge as I left my flat in the city and walked up towards Campbell park viewing point, the highest point in Milton Keynes to get a better view of all the lightning. At the end of the day my stuff is insured, and when your times up your times up, no amount of hiding away indoors will change the fact, so that's why I always go outside to enjoy and better appreciate the wonder of nature and how powerful it is.  :crazy: 

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Here's a good motto I use: If you spend your whole life being afraid, you never get to experience life at all.

I do understand that, but I will jump on a Speedway bike, no breaks, 0-60 in 2.5 seconds and race in a confined space, mostly sideways with 3 other racers, probably the most dangerous motor sports on the planet, so it's selective fear, I am a he'll of a lot better in a storm than I used to be, so very, very slowly growing out of it..... And the really odd thing is it does fascinate me and I do get excited as well, just the fear of lightning seems to kick in.........

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I don't do any prep but last night was a little unnerving as tere were flashes all around the horizon but no way to know what the clouds were doing above so I felt a but better when the storms got closer as I knew where they were and they lit up the underneath of the clouds overhead so I could sort of see what wa going on.

The only thing I prepare is a raincoat and a tripod!

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I don't do any prep but last night was a little unnerving as tere were flashes all around the horizon but no way to know what the clouds were doing above so I felt a but better when the storms got closer as I knew where they were and they lit up the underneath of the clouds overhead so I could sort of see what wa going on.The only thing I prepare is a raincoat and a tripod!

So I sort of get that, knowing exactly what was going on, I suppose knowing there isn't a thunder cloud directly overhead is a plus.... especially if you are  outdoors....

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If you have a horrible fear of storms just go and sit in your car. As long as it is a metal car (and most are) then the faraday cage effect will keep you completely safe (although I can't vouch for falling trees, meteor strikes and giant monsters)

For the same reason if you want to watch a storm from the top of a hill make sure you are inside the car not standing next to it. Oh and if you like leaning out of the window watching a storm make sure you are not leaning against the radiator if there is one - the house pipework conducts electricity nicely.

Assuming you buy a ticket you are more likely to win the lottery than be struck by lightning - but of course some people do win now and then !

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@ Speedway Slider: The setup last night wasnt your everyday thunderstorm. Storms which fire up in the region of a high pressure area normally tend to to be more intense lightning wise because the updrafts can go to a great height and have higher windspeeds. Yesterday was typical, the cap was broken sometime during the evening, a few cells fired, grew stronger and started organizing themseves. A very localized small low pressure area is created by the cells and thats what keeps them going. Possibly heat rising from London and Reading helped with the initial triggering.  Judging by the number of strikes over the Reading area it surprises me that "only" 10 house fires were caused. Also, with these setups the electrical power of the strikes is higher than with ordinary storms, the strike is hotter and can set off a fire more easy. Lastly it always surprises me how few lightning conductors I spot on houses when I am in the UK...

 

@Flashbang: Hogs Back has quite a lot of trees which hinder the view, did you position yourself more to the east end facing Farnham?

 

Glad you guys and girls in the storm starved region got a good lightshow last night, Im actually quite sad I missed out, was supposed to have been back in the UK yesterday afternoon,but too much work in germany, better luck next time

 

Ralph

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You see this is real danger, isn't it...? I cannot see how anyone can say they truly aren't scared of thunderstorms... 10 houses, and that was just the reported in Reading!!

I would have been absolutely distraught if these storms had of affected Leicester.... By God I would have been terrified!! It was bad enough on here with all you lot like you were at firework displays, how can you not be scared of situations like that, especially at such close quarters... I bet Gordon was worried as well, even though we didn't have storms, we were lucky.....

Just how can you overcome the fear of thunder when actually, it is dangerous unlike clowns, pavement cracks etc......

 

Because if you look at it rationally, the actual risk is very low indeed. You're in far more danger crossing the road. Besides, the "sense" of danger makes it even more exciting.

Edited by Nick L
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I'm another one who's scared of thunderstorms, but I still can't get enough of them, I will sit in the car when taking photos of lighning,2 trypod legs in the passenger foot - well and 1 on the seat, even if it's not raining.

I'm getting better with the fear though, just got to get out and enjoy the best free show mother nature can throw at us!

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I do understand that, but I will jump on a Speedway bike, no breaks, 0-60 in 2.5 seconds and race in a confined space, mostly sideways with 3 other racers, probably the most dangerous motor sports on the planet, so it's selective fear, I am a he'll of a lot better in a storm than I used to be, so very, very slowly growing out of it..... And the really odd thing is it does fascinate me and I do get excited as well, just the fear of lightning seems to kick in.........

Well, I would say your chances of catching a cropper on the speedway are easily thousandfold compared to being struck by lightning, so dont worry..

 

Ralph

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@Flashbang: Hogs Back has quite a lot of trees which hinder the view, did you position yourself more to the east end facing Farnham?Ralph

I went right down to the Farnham roundabout and realised there that I was heading into the storm. There were forks dropping over towards hook way every 5-10 secs so I went round the roundabout and headed back up toward Guildford. There's a lay by just before the Godalming turn-off and I set up there for 10mins. A few tall bushes there but with the right angle/ height/ tripod you can get a good shot across toward the north/ NE. Bit high up and exposed for a direct hit so went home to watch the action after that :-) Edited by Flash bang flash bang etc
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So black here the street lights have come on in Shropshire.

Incredible! Getting dark in Cardiff, humidity is unbelievable . Feels like a storm could develop from nothing to incredible at any time
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First post on this forum but as I live in Farnham and stayed up till 4am watching the storm I couldn't resist. I didn't think we were due anything yesterday and for once didn't watch the radar, so the first I saw of storm activity was distant lightning over Reading way about 11:30pm. By the time it hit us it was really impressive...sadly didn't get to take any photos or video which I really regret. Reminded me of a storm I was in when travelling from Frankfurt to Bruchsal as a teenager in the early 90s :D

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Dark convective clouds and the odd drop of rain , humidity has risen quite a lot though not expecting any t and l , also stayed warm and sunny for town carnival !!......

Edited by Mokidugway
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@ Speedway Slider: The setup last night wasnt your everyday thunderstorm. Storms which fire up in the region of a high pressure area normally tend to to be more intense lightning wise because the updrafts can go to a great height and have higher windspeeds. Yesterday was typical, the cap was broken sometime during the evening, a few cells fired, grew stronger and started organizing themseves. A very localized small low pressure area is created by the cells and thats what keeps them going. Possibly heat rising from London and Reading helped with the initial triggering.  Judging by the number of strikes over the Reading area it surprises me that "only" 10 house fires were caused. Also, with these setups the electrical power of the strikes is higher than with ordinary storms, the strike is hotter and can set off a fire more easy. Lastly it always surprises me how few lightning conductors I spot on houses when I am in the UK...

 

@Flashbang: Hogs Back has quite a lot of trees which hinder the view, did you position yourself more to the east end facing Farnham?

 

Glad you guys and girls in the storm starved region got a good lightshow last night, Im actually quite sad I missed out, was supposed to have been back in the UK yesterday afternoon,but too much work in germany, better luck next time

 

Ralph

Really interesting post - thank you.

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Just like yesterday things are starting to happen as the robust cap starts to erode...

Just had a twelve second blast of hail from a beefy updraft that's just gone up

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