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Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    I've only gone and done it. This went to the Press Complaints Commission this morning....

     

     

     

     

    1i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including pictures.The Express (and in particular Nathan Rao) have been making frightening predictions about the weather for ages, of late.Nov 11th - Artic winds to bring snow and flood chaos. Based on nothing, it didn't happen when they said it would.Nov 12th - Britain braced for Artic Plunge - Again there was no evidence that it was anything more than a temporary pocket of cooler air.Nov 13th - Heavy Snow Warking "Shock" long range forecast for winter - Wrong.Nov 17th - 100 Days of Heavy Snow - WrongNov 18th - Artic Blast to last a month - Er, no.Nov 21st - "Screaming" gales and 12 inches of snow - Wrong again.Nov 22nd - Winter 2013 to be longest in history - WrongNov 25th - Snow could fall until May - Nonsense.Dec 2nd - Get ready for arctic plunge - One day of cold, no snow for most, then back to mild.Dec 3rd - SNOW WARNING: Arctic storm set to blast Britain with 90mph gales and crippling blizzards- Hmmm 

     

    The structure of the story is always the same. A bold and highly frightening sub-headline, followed by an explanation of why and how we're all going to die. Then there will be a quote from James Madden at Exacta Weather who has been completely discredited by the meteorological community, followed unsually by a secondary quote from Jonathan Powell who also uses dubious techniques and loves forecasting armageddon-like weather situations.By the end of the article there will be a more sober prediction from The Met Office which is the only bit of truth in these stories.By way of an example of the inaccuracy, the story on the 12th gives warning of the worst storm ever. Quite how such a claim can be quantified is unclear but for the purposes of clarity the current long-range forecast for Christmas day using a number of reliable computer models suggests that the UK will be under the influence of a polar vortex to the NW which will bring quite normal wet and windy weather over the holiday period.But most people just read the headline and panic. I get asked every day "where's this worst winter ever", "Is that typhoon going to hit us at Christmas?", usually followed up with "they (by implication, The Met Office) don't know what they are doing".It causes fear in the minds of the vulnerable, it discredits professional forecasters and it's just plain wrong.I also feel that The Daily Express is in breach of section 1iii as they report these forecasts as fact "Hurricane-force gales and torrential downpours will lash the country at the start of Christmas " the important word being "will".The online version under a photograph of lightning says "Huge winter storms are set to devastate much of Britain " which is at best conjecture and at worst reckless.While my complaint relates to one of these articles I feel The Express should be made an example of. The Daily Mail, The Metro and The Daily Star have all published highly inaccurate forecasts of impending apocolyptic weather recently. Of course a cynic could suggest that Nathan Rao has some sort of vested interest in stories that push up the share value of energy companies, maybe The Express own shares in companies that benefit from the panic caused by these nonsense stories. Maybe the PCC should investigate. 

     

    The PCC can't do anything about it unfortunately

     

     

    Sadly they are not regulated by the IPCC - see reply from them below:Thank you for making a complaint to the Press Complaints Commission about the Daily Express.The PCC formally considers complaints about the vast majority of UK newspapers and magazines, provided that they subscribe to the system of self-regulation independently overseen by the PCC.Northern & Shell – the publishers of the Daily Express – do not currently subscribe to the system of self-regulation independently overseen by the PCC. The publication does not therefore fall under the Commission’s jurisdiction and, as such, we are unable to take forward your concerns in this matter.In the circumstances, you may wish to complain directly to the publication. Its contact details are as follows:Nicole PattersonDaily Express Legal DepartmentThe Northern & Shell Building10 Lower Thames StreetLondon, EC3R 6ENSwitchboard Tel: 020 8612 7000News Desk Tel: 020 7098 [email protected]: Hugh Whittow

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    With state of the art technology and the latest info available at the flick of a switch I fail to see why the public should have to put up with out of date forecasts. In this fast moving situation its

    I've only gone and done it. This went to the Press Complaints Commission this morning....         1i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including

    Some more images from London this morning  

    Posted Images

    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
    Has Nathan not run out of Apocolyptical headlines yet? What is he on? When a really damaging storm is actually on it's way, the general public won't believe it...
     
    post-6667-0-49195000-1386951684_thumb.jp
    Freak storm to batter Britain: 100mph winds and downpours to cause chaos
     
    ANOTHER freak storm is set to sweep Britain next week as our topsy-turvy weather continues.
     
    “The worst case is 70 to 90mph gusts across exposed parts of Wales and the South but we could see 70mph gusts across central Britain which would cause a lot of disruption. “This storm has the potential to affect a large part of the UK population. If it strikes between December 18 and 20 we will call it Emily, after Emily Bronte who died on December 19, 1848.
     
    “From Thursday to Christmas there is a high risk of gales over the UK.†Snow will also be a hazard in Scotland with high winds whipping up blizzard conditions. The storm is the latest in a chaotic run of weather following last week’s 142mph winds which wrought havoc across the North while the east coast saw the biggest tidal surge for 60 years

     

    Last month the St Jude’s Day storm also brought 100mph-plus winds and left a trail of destruction in its wake. Jonathan Powell, of Vantage Weather Services, blamed a deep Atlantic low pressure system for next week’s problems. He said: “This is expected to hit the North-west initially where gusts could exceed 100mph in parts. Elsewhere 70 to 80mph is likely. “We are looking at very strong and destructive gusts with the potential to topple trees and damage buildings. “There is a generally stormy picture running up to Christmas. People should be prepared for disruption and damage to property.†The Met Office last night played down the warnings, however. Spokeswoman Laura Young said: “At the moment we see no cause to issue any weather warnings for next Thursday.â€
     
    Forecaster Helen Chivers said: “We are heading into an unsettled period and there is a risk of gales and rain. However, it is too early to predict.

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/448402/Freak-storm-to-batter-Britain-100mph-winds-and-downpours-to-cause-chaos

     

    It continually amazes me that the voice of reason, the Met Office, always get their comment further down the article, when many people have already had their minds made up by the rubbish in the first few lines.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington 63 m or 206ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: Cold, Snow, Storms, Snow Thunder, Supercells, all weather extremes
  • Location: Darlington 63 m or 206ft above sea level
    Posted
  • Location: N.Bedfordshire, E.Northamptonshire
  • Weather Preferences: Cool not cold, warm not hot. No strong Wind.
  • Location: N.Bedfordshire, E.Northamptonshire

     

    Has Nathan not run out of Apocolyptical headlines yet? What is he on? When a really damaging storm is actually on it's way, the general public won't believe it...
     

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/448402/Freak-storm-to-batter-Britain-100mph-winds-and-downpours-to-cause-chaos

     

    It continually amazes me that the voice of reason, the Met Office, always get their comment further down the article, when many people have already had their minds made up by the rubbish in the first few lines.

     

    Totally agree, I would rather hope the general public would see this is nonsense and stop buying the c-r-4-p they are peddling and they disappear from the shelves instead.

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    Posted
  • Location: Tornado Alley, west London
  • Location: Tornado Alley, west London

    Are Mr Fish's contributions to the Express, as interpreted by the scare-mongering Nathan, really sponsored by Netweather, as that image seems to suggest? Does Netweather really want to be associated with Nathan's exaggerations? Yikes!

     

    And how often do southern hemisphere systems  cross into the northern hemisphere?

     

    "The shock warning came as a series of 'frenzied' storm systems - which have lined up in the south Atlantic - started to charge towards Britain."

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/448115/Christmas-weather-forecast-Winter-storms-warning-as-snow-gales-and-floods-threaten-UK

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    'Storm Emily' set to batter Britain with blizzards and 100mph winds in run up to Christmas

     

    Britain is set to be battered by a new freak weather system that could bring 100mph winds and blizzards in the run up to Christmas, forecasters say. A so-called Storm Emily could wreak havoc across much of the UK beginning from the middle of next week, potentially toppling trees and tearing off roof tiles. Weather Channel forecasters are naming the storm after Wuthering Heights author Emily Bronte, who died 165 years ago next Thursday - the day the storm is expected to strike.Meanwhile, the Met Office has issued a Yellow Warning for northern and western parts of the UK tonight, including Scotland and Northern Ireland, advising of possible travel disruption in those regions.

     

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2523645/Storm-Emily-set-batter-Britain-week-100mph-winds.html

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  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.
  • Weather Preferences: Thunder, snow, heat, sunshine...
  • Location: Beccles, Suffolk.

    I'm sure the Excreta will beat that... 200 mph Super Hurricane Emily to Blow The UK into North Sea, Experts Warn...

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Odds of a white Christmas even higher as bookies predict low chance of snow after unseasonably warm weather

     

    The chances of a white Christmas seem slim as recent bouts of warm weather across the country make the odds of snow higher. Though it is too early for the Met Office to predict the weather for December 25, bookies are forecasting a balmy Christmas day with the odds of snowfall as high as 10-1 in some parts of the country.  The last white Christmas was in 2010 when temperatures plunged to -17C and snow blanketed more than 80 per cent of the UK's weather stations.

     

    The chance of snowfall in London has become slimmer, with bookies raising their odds from 6-1 last week to 8-1 today. It is even less likely to snow in Bristol and Cardiff, where residents face odds of 9-1, and in Norwich where bookies predict a 10-1 chance of blizzards.  Scots' hopes for a white Christmas remain in tact however, with Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen more likely to be blanketed with odds of 4-1.  With temperatures as high as 13C in some parts of the country, the weather is unseasonably warm for this time of the year when temperatures are expected to stay between 7C and 9C.

     

    Though warnings of high winds and gales covered Scotland and Northern Ireland, a Met Office guide revealed there was little to anticipate in most parts of England. Meteorologist Leon Brown, of the Weather Channel, said: 'It's not going to be a white Christmas, but it will be wet, windy and stormy. 'We'll be in the firing line next week, and over Christmas, for anything developing from the Atlantic.'  Pressure from the jet stream — air currents that act as a barrier between warm and cold weather — will fall south of the UK this weekend, bringing rain and high winds with gusts of up to 80 mph in the north. Heavy rain is then likely to drift south.

     

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2523716/White-Christmas-odds-steeper-unseasonably-warm-weather.html?ico=home^headlines

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
    Plants flower as warm and wet weather tells wildlife it's springtime: Winter woolies still in wardrobe as temperatures are double the December average
    • Mild weather tricks flowers into blossom and wildlife into leaving hibernation
    • In West Berkshire people were seen enjoying outdoors in just shirts
    • But heavy rainfall is expected to sweep through south today
    Winter woollies have remained in the wardrobe with many parts of Britain basking in temperatures of almost double the December average - but stand by for a soaking today. The Met Office has issued a severe weather warning for southern counties as up to half the month’s rain is expected, bringing a risk of flooding and travel disruption. Commuters face a miserable Monday with the RAC warning motorists in affected areas to be ‘extremely careful and consider whether it is essential to travel’.
     
    Wet, windy and unsettled conditions are expected to continue over the next month apart from some frosty nights, with a white Christmas unlikely except in some parts of Scotland, forecasters say. Temperatures yesterday reached 14.7C (58F) in Bude, Cornwall, compared with the December average of 8C (46F) in South West England.
     
    The incredibly mild weather has tricked nature into thinking spring is here already, with flowers blossoming and wildlife coming out of hibernation prematurely. Nature lovers in Berkshire have reported butterflies including a small tortoiseshell and a yellow brimstone at the Lower Way lakes in Thatcham. The two native species normally emerge from winter hibernation in March.
     
    Wood pigeons were even spotted mating at Marlborough, Wiltshire, which means they could be making nests and laying eggs before the New Year. And at Inkpen, near Newbury, people out walking in shirts instead of thick winter coats reported clumps of spring daisies and white dead nettles in full bloom with grass growing lushly in the absence of sub-zero temperatures.
     
    Emma Corrigan, Meteorological Office forecaster, said: ‘Temperatures have been markedly mild for the time of year with most places in double figures. ‘The normal UK average in mid December is 7C (45F). There have also not been as many cold and frosty nights as usual. ‘We are likely to see the mild weather continue over the coming month with no sign of a cold snap - although it will be quite unsettled with outbreaks of rain and strong winds. ‘At Christmas, there is potential for wintry showers on the higher ground in Scotland but snow is unlikely elsewhere.’ She added, however, that a return to mild weather after three years of very cold winters is ‘not anything abnormal’.
     
    Today’s weather warning covers counties all along the south coast from Devon to Kent and north into Wiltshire, Berkshire and Greater London. Heavy rain is expected all day, with up to 40mm set to fall - compared with a total December average of 80mm for southern Britain. Simon Williams, RAC spokesman, said: ‘Motorists in affected areas need to be extremely careful and consider whether it is essential to travel. ‘Those who do set out should take particular care to avoid deep flood water, which can cause catastrophic engine damage.’
     
    Away from the south, today is expected to be mainly dry and cloudy for the rest of England, while Scotland and Northern Ireland - which had gales of 70mph to 80mph over the weekend - can expect blustery showers. Tuesday will be dry and bright for most areas although some patchy rain is expected to linger in the south east. But Wednesday will see a return to wet and windy weather ahead of Storm Emily hitting much of the country, the Meteorological Office said.
     
    Weather Channel meteorologist Leon Brown said there was a high risk of gales across Wales and the south. He said that if the storm arrives on 19 December, as predicted, it will be named Storm Emily after Emily Brontë, the author who died on that date 165 years ago. The Met Office already has a severe weather warning scheduled for the storm, in force from 12.05am on Thursday. It said: 'Given the potential for a significant winter storm the public should continue to monitor the Met Office website for updates to this warning.'
     

     

     
     
     
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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

     

    We're also still waiting for the 100 days of heavy snow to arrive as promised in the Daily Express

     

    Posted Image

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Christmas Weather: Britain To Be Wet And Windy

     

    Britons hoping for a white Christmas are ikely to be disappointed as early forecasts suggest very wet and windy weather next week. A European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model shows very low pressure over the UK on December 25. Forecasters remain cautious but admit the trends suggest a stormy festive holiday. Sky News weather producer Joanna Robinson said: "Christmas Day is still a long way off meteorologically speaking, but computer models are hinting that the unsettled theme will continue. "Some computer models show a deep area of low pressure moving in from the Atlantic on Christmas Day, bringing very wet and windy conditions.

     

    Posted Image

    MeteoGroup's tweeted map shows low pressure and fairly mild temperatures.

     

    "There’s still time for that to change though, so it's worth keeping an eye on the forecast this week. "The unsettled conditions will mean that temperatures will remain around or above average, therefore snow is looking very unlikely at this point.†Forecasters MeteoGroup tweeted maps indicating low pressure and fairly mild temperatures for the time of year, while the ECMWF map was put out by MetDesk.

    Posted Image

    MetDesk tweeted the ECMWF's model for December 25

     

    Michael Dukes, MetDesk Director of Forecasting said: "It looks very much like it won’t be a white Christmas for most of us, with the possible exception of northern hills and mountains. "It's still a little too far off for much in the way of detail, but current indications are that the Christmas period will very unsettled and often wet/stormy with the risk of high winds as our weather continues to sweep in from the Atlantic. "Temperatures will be mostly above average for the time of year, but it may be cold enough at times for some wet snow over northern hills and mountains. "We are watching that risk of high winds with interest, but we won’t be sure if it’s actually going to happen or how bad it will be until five or six days out. Heavy rain in the days before Christmas last year caused severe flooding in some areas.

     

    http://news.sky.com/story/1183239/christmas-weather-britain-to-be-wet-and-windy

    Edited by Summer Sun
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  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Mark Reynolds now standing in for Nathan Rao at the 'End of the World weather news-desk' ?

     

    Prepare for Storm Emily! Deadly 100mph blizzards to hit Britain on Christmas Day
     
    A FEROCIOUS storm is set to pound Britain from tomorrow with 100mph winds and blizzards before another arrives in time for Christmas Day.
     
    Forecasters gave the ominous double warning as two vast weather depressions edged towards the UK. The second is expected to lead to an extremely stormy festive period over the entire country. But while severe gales and rain are expected to batter Britain into December 25, it is highly unlikely to bring a white Christmas, with any snow in the North turning back to squally showers, forecasters said last night.
     
    The first of the two sprawling weather systems, known as Storm Emily, will begin sweeping across the UK tomorrow night, bringing gale-force southerly winds across Wales and western England. Winds will increase in ferocity with the worst conditions north of the border, where gusts of up to 100mph could cause structural damage. As temperatures fall, heavy rain will quickly turn to snow, leading to blizzard conditions across higher ground in the North. Forecasters named the first storm after Wuthering Heights author Emily Bronte, who died 165 years ago on Thursday – the day the weather system is expected to be at its worst.
     
    And they predicted the biggest gusts could be between 80 and 100mph. Last night the Met Office issued severe weather warnings for Wednesday night. A spokesman said: “Severe gale force winds are likely to affect parts of Northern Ireland, central and northern Scotland on Wednesday night and early on Thursday gusts may exceed 80mph locally.
     
    “The wind will lead to large waves with some coastal over-topping possible. In addition, persistent heavy rain will quickly clear from Scotland leaving squally wintry showers. “The public should be aware of the potential for disruption from this combination of weather events.â€
     
    Yesterday commuters and Christmas shoppers battled high winds which whipped across southern England, causing blackouts and downing trees which blocked roads, while southern coasts were also hit. However, temperatures have so far been unseasonably mild. The balmy conditions, particularly in the South, have led to the premature growth of raspberries, apples and other fruit which have been “tricked†into thinking it is already spring. Early snowdrops – that usually flower in February – have also been seen, with temperatures in the South reaching 57F (14C) yesterday – typical weather for April. But the warmer conditions have fuelled the severe weather patterns crossing the country.
     
    After Emily, long-range forecasters warned that a second system – set to sweep in just before Christmas Day – could be equally powerful, with high winds and rain. Weather Channel forecaster Leon Brown said: “There will be a lull in the winds (today) with a ridge of high pressure over the UK, and the best day of the week for much of the UK, although some rain may linger over the far South-east in Kent and East Sussex. But winds then increase again for tomorrow with strong to gale force southerly winds by evening across Wales and western England.
     
    “The storm to watch, which we are naming Emily, will swing past Northern Ireland to north-west Scotland late tomorrow night to early Thursday. “The areas at most risk are the far north of Ireland to western Scotland in the early hours of Thursday. Peak mean speeds may reach 60 to 70mph over the Hebrides with gusts of 90 to 100mph.†There were warnings it could mean treacherous driving conditions with widespread travel disruption. But after Emily has passed, he warned that the country will then be hit by the second system in the run-up to Christmas week.
     
    “The next stormy period then looks like Christmas Eve to Christmas Day with a very deep low pressure system moving further south. There could be severe gales across the southern half of the UK on Christmas Day.â€

     

     

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/449099/Deadly-100mph-storms-to-hit-Britain-on-Christmas-day

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Not quite as outrageously sensationalist as Nathan Rao, wonder if he's been moved on due to the ridicule the strories have generated?

     

    He's not left the weather stories here's today's from him

     

    VIDEO: Michael Fish launches appeal to help those struggling with soaring energy bills

     

    HE is best known for being Great Britain’s most loved and iconic weatherman. And now Michael Fish is throwing his weight behind a campaign to raise awareness of help available to vulnerable people this winter. He has joined forces with Home Heat Helpline which gives advice on benefits and funding available to people struggling to pay soaring energy bills. Around 99 per cent of eligible UK households missed the chance for help last year as they did not apply - with 60 per cent who are entitled to support being “unwilling to askâ€. Michael said he was shocked to discover there are 3.6 million homes - 14 per cent of the nation - eligible for assistance with their energy bills. He said: “Some of these figures really surprised me, it is an awful lot of people that need help. “As we sit in our nice warm homes we don’t realise just how many people are suffering, and this is why I have decided to back this campaign".

     

    The former BBC broadcaster is the star of a spoof weather report encouraging people to seek out assistance as the cold weather sets in. In the mock report the weather legend, famous for his infamous 1987 hurricane blunder, highlights cold spots from last year’s winter. The video can be viewed on the Home Heat Helpline website, Facebook page and on YouTube. Michael said: “Hopefully with a super star national icon behind this, more people will take notice and I am very pleased to be involved. “It doesn’t have to be an exceptionally cold winter for people to be at risk, if you are in an old house with poor insulation it can get very cold. “I hope this video really gets the message across that people don’t have to sit in cold homes over winter, there are funds available".

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/comment/columnists/nathan-rao/449003/VIDEO-Michael-Fish-launches-appeal-to-help-those-struggling-with-soaring-energy-bills

     
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  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
    2013 in review: a year of increasing extreme weather events
     
    John Vidal looks back at a year of record heatwaves, floods, rainstorms and cyclones
     
    2013 was the seventh warmest year on record and saw one of the strongest cyclones, some of the longest heatwaves and the most topsy-turvy weather experienced in decades.
     
    Nowhere is thought to have witnessed faster change than Nikkaluokta, a small Lapland village above the Arctic circle in northern Sweden. On 3 December, it was enjoying an unseasonally warm 4.7C. Within a few days, the temperature had dropped to a bone-chilling -40.8C (-41.4F) but on 10 December it rose again in just a few hours to a balmy 7.7C. The 48.5C rise in under 48 hours is one of the greatest ever recorded and is comparable to the world's fastest-temperature rise: 27C in just two minutes in Spearfish, South Dakota back in 1943.
     
    What happened in Lapland was, on the surface at least, not unusual, abrupt short-term weather change possibly caused by a convoluted jet stream. But in a major report this month, the US National Research Council warned that abrupt climate change was already being seen with the collapse of the Arctic sea ice and in extinction rates. The good news, it said, was that most of the extreme climate predictions made over the past decade, such as an upwelling of methane from the bottom of the oceans or a shutdown of the Atlantic conveyor, were extremely unlikely – at least in the medium term. But the message was clear: if temperatures go on rising, expect the unexpected over the next 100 years.
     
    The IPCC 5th assessment report, which is considered the consensus of world scientists, was unequivocal that climate change was happening fast. In September, it stated that each of the last three decades had been successively warmer at the Earth's surface than at any preceding decade since measurements started in 1850. The period 1983-2012 was probably the warmest in the past 1,400 years, it said, and both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets were losing mass, along with most glaciers worldwide.
     
    The Arctic in 2013 saw nowhere near as much sea ice loss as the exceptional 2012 when all records were broken by nearly 20%, but the relatively cool year still witnessed the sixth greatest ice loss since observations began in 1979. All seven lowest minimum ice extents have now occurred in the past seven years. Significantly for sea level rise, IPCC scientists said the loss of ice from Greenland's ice sheet, which is situtated on land, has probably increased from around 34bn tonnes a year in the last decade of the 20th century to 215bn tonnes a year today.
     
    Confusingly, sea ice, which grows in winter months and retreats in summer each year, has steadily been growing in Antarctica. In September, the end of the southern hemisphere's winter, the ice extended to 19.51m sq kms, breaking a 35-year record. This, said some climate contrarians, showed for a fact that global warming was not happening. But scientists elsewhere countered that the ice growth was probabaly being driven by the convergence of stronger winds near the south pole. Latest observations from Europe's ice-monitoring satellite, CryoSat, suggests that the west Antarctic ice sheet appears to be shedding far more ice than just a few years ago, from around 30bn tonnes a year in the 1990s to around 147bn tonnes a year now as major glaciers retreat.
     
    Despite Antarctica's simultaneous warming and cooling phenomena, the second lowest temperatures ever measured on Earth was recorded in July at Dome Argus in the centre of the Antarctic plateau. The previous record low was -89.2C in 1983 at the Russian Vostok research station in east Antarctica. But a Nasa satellite this year detected an extraordinary -93.0C on July 10. This was marginally above the -93.2C recorded there in 2010*. Because neither temperature was measured on land, they will not be registered as official records.
     
    Heat extremes dominated the year. The last four months of 2012 were abnormally hot in Australia but January 2013 was the hottest month ever measured on the continent, with record temperatures being set in every state and territory and the highest recorded maximum of 49.6C at Moomba in South Australia. Temperatures were regularly above 48C, the Bureau of Meteorology added a new temperature colour to its maps and Sydney experienced its hottest night on record when it was still 34C at midnight on 10 January. According to the since axed Australian Climate Commission, Australians should get used to it: not only are heatwaves getting longer, hotter and more frequent, the number of record hot days is expected to quadruple in Sydney by the end of the century.
     
    Portugal, China, Hungary, Finland, and Britain, all recorded heatwaves, and the temperature in Death Valley, California hit 129.2F (54.0C), the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth during June. Meanwhile, Shanghai had 24 days with temperatures at or above 35C in July and recorded 40.6C, the highest ever temperature recorded in 140 years of records in the city. Northeast Brazil, which often suffers long droughts, experienced its worst in 50 years followed last week by massive floods.
     
    Europe, overall, was warmer than usual but the heat turned quickly to massive rainstorms. As much rain fell in a few hours in June in central Europe as normally falls in two months. The Czech Republic , Austria, south and east Germany, Switzerland, Slovakia, Belarus, Poland, Hungary and Serbia all experienced heavy flooding in what were desribed as one in 100 year rains. In some places in Austria, 150 to 200mm of rain (5.9 to 7.9 inches) fell in a day.
     
    Less high-profile were massive floods in Sudan, where more than 250,000 people were forced from their homes in August. The region around the capital, Khartoum, was particularly badly hit, with at least 15,000 homes destroyed and thousands of others damaged.
     
    The heat was also seen in the oceans. The journal Sceince reported that since 1950 Pacific Ocean waters had been warming at a rate 15 times faster than the rest of the seafloor. This suggested to some that the ocean depths may store more heat from global warming than suspected. The Pacific Ocean, in particular, seems to be absorbing more heat than at any other time in the past 50 years.
     
    Because the strength of tropical storms is linked to ocean temperature, it came as a surprise that the 2013 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season was one of the weakest recorded in 50 years. There were no major hurricanes in the Carribean, Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic basin and only Ingrid and Humberto out of the 13 named storms reached hurricane strength.
     
    It was a very different story in the western-north Pacific however, where 30 major storms had been recorded by early November. Thirteen of them were typhoon-strength, the biggest by some way being typhoon Haiyan, possibly the most powerful tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history. Haiyan smashed into the southern Phillippines, killing 6,000 people and wreaking massive damage.
     
    The World Meteorological Organisation said that it was impossible to blame climate change for individual storms but increasing evidence emerged during the year that there was a link. When in January 2013 scientists at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the UK's Met Office, and the research teams from 16 other global institutions tried to calculate how much climate change had possibly influenced 12 extreme weather events that occurred in 2012, they concluded that it had helped raise the temperatures during the run of 37.7C days in last year's US heatwave, and was behind the record loss of Arctic sea ice and the storm surge of hurricane Sandy, plus several other extremes.
     
    The weather year ended in a similar turmoil to how it had started – with hail falling in Cairo, snow in Israel, Syria and Jordan, and record high temperatures in Scandinavia and unseasonable heat on the Gulf Coast of the United States. *How cold is that? About 10C colder than anything ever recorded in Alaska or Siberia. The lowest temnperatures ever recorded in Britain was a relatively mild -27C in Scotland in 1982, and -23C in 1994 in Australia.

     

     

     

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/dec/18/2013-extreme-weather-events

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Hold on to your hats! 100mph Storm Emily will roar in tonight with 'a sting in her tail'

     

    BRITAIN is on alert for a violent storm to unleash torrential downpours and 100mph gales tonight. Swathes of the country are set to be battered by Storm Emily, due to roar in from the Atlantic bringing a week of chaos. Hurricane-force gusts will ­pummel the west coast while the North could see a fortnight’s rain in hours. Heavy showers will turn to snow, with blizzards expected to cripple parts of Scotland amid plunging temperatures. Forecasters said a series of low-pressure systems will trigger another onslaught on Friday with ferocious gales also due on ­Christmas Day. The Met Office last night issued severe weather warnings for wind and rain across northern and western parts until the weekend. Up to eight inches of snow and 80mph winds are likely in Scotland from tomorrow, with some regions deluged by more than two inches of rain.

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/449277/Hold-on-to-your-hats-100mph-Storm-Emily-will-roar-in-tonight-with-a-sting-in-her-tail

     
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  • Location: Essex Riviera aka Burnham
  • Weather Preferences: 30 Degrees of pure British Celsius
  • Location: Essex Riviera aka Burnham

    It's back to the 8 inches of snow thing again in Scotland to go with the 8 inches they had at the end of November :)

    Expecting the Express headlines to go 'berzerk' with potential Severe Gales/storms next week, at least they could be more accurate with that that than the supposed 'Arctic blast to last weeks' back in late November.

    Anybody know how Madden's forecast is going? 

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    It's back to the 8 inches of snow thing again in Scotland to go with the 8 inches they had at the end of November Posted Image

    Expecting the Express headlines to go 'berzerk' with potential Severe Gales/storms next week, at least they could be more accurate with that that than the supposed 'Arctic blast to last weeks' back in late November.

    Anybody know how Madden's forecast is going? 

     

    Snow wise not very good at all

     

    :)

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  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

     

    Hold on to your hats! 100mph Storm Emily will roar in tonight with 'a sting in her tail'

     

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/449277/Hold-on-to-your-hats-100mph-Storm-Emily-will-roar-in-tonight-with-a-sting-in-her-tail

     

    Rao! Nathan Rao!
    Daylight come and the World is gone
    Ray, me say Ray, me say Ray, me say Ray
    Me say Ray, me say Rao
    Daylight come and he’s blown away
     
    Work all night on a drink of rum
    (Snow is come and me wan' stay home)
    Read Express till the mornin' come
    (10†come and me wan' get home)
     
    Come, Mister Daily Man, tally me the chaos
    (Daylight come and we’re blown away)
    Come, Mister Daily Man, tally me disaster
    (Daylight come and were buried in snow)
     
    Well six foot, seven foot, eight foot drift!
    (Daylight come and were buried in snow)
    Six foot, seven foot, eight foot drift!
    (Daylight come and were up to our necks)
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  • Location: Bedworth, North Warwickshire 404ft above sea level
  • Location: Bedworth, North Warwickshire 404ft above sea level

    Just seen a lovely quote in the Mail about how warm eastern Russia is at the moment.....

     

     

    While Siberia remains slightly colder than western Europe, most locals say they have never experienced a December so warm. 

    Fyodor Olifirenko, 83, from Novosibirsk, the most northerly city in the world, told the Siberian Times: 'I do not remember such a warm December.

    'In 1963 there was some thaw on December 24-25, it was raining a bit. But by morning all was frozen and after that started strong frosts.'"

     
     

    The 1963 correlation is rather exciting isn't it? :-D

     

     

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2525993/What-happened-Siberia-Russian-region-famous-cold-experiences-freak-warm-weather-December-time-living-memory.html

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