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PeteB

Jetstream Question

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I've just seen the latest positioning of the Jetstream over in the model discussion forums. It looks to have migrated a long way from its normal trajectory. Could someone tell me how much overall variation there is in the position of the Jetsteam, in other words what's the furthest North and South it ever goes?

Thanks,

Pete

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I've just seen the latest positioning of the Jetstream over in the model discussion forums. It looks to have migrated a long way from its normal trajectory. Could someone tell me how much overall variation there is in the position of the Jetsteam, in other words what's the furthest North and South it ever goes?

Thanks,

Pete

I'm not sure if this will help, but this thread could be a good starting point:

http://forum.netweather.tv/topic/44825-jet-stream/page__p__1167088__hl__jetstream__fromsearch__1#entry1167088

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on the model discussion thread Steve Murr said that a high pressure system of 584 decameters was being modelled over Greenland. Now I know that a decameter is 10 metres so could someone be good enough to explain to me what this is in millibars. SM seems to think this is some kind of record but the models are only showing an anticyclone of 1045 millibars. confused! Thanks in anticipation.

SS2

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on the model discussion thread Steve Murr said that a high pressure system of 584 decameters was being modelled over Greenland. Now I know that a decameter is 10 metres so could someone be good enough to explain to me what this is in millibars. SM seems to think this is some kind of record but the models are only showing an anticyclone of 1045 millibars. confused! Thanks in anticipation.

SS2

Hi there,

A little late, but the 582 dam he is referering to is the height that you would have to ascend to above the earths surface to reach a pressure of 500 MB, not sure why it was origionally done this way instead of plotting the pressures at some x KM height.

These areas often correlate well (especially if cut off) with the position of surface highs and lows (which are in MB at mean sea level).

The highest ever surface pressure recorded was 1085.6 mb; Tosontsengel, Khövsgöl Province, Mongolia, December 19, 2001.

KP

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  • High pressure in the driving seat until at least the end of May

    High pressure continues to dominate our weather until at least early next week, with most staying dry and fine. The warm conditions will spread north, and the highest temperatures will transfer to the west as the high moves east and eventually over Scandinavia. Read the full update here

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    More warmth and little rain in the forecast as May ends

    HIgh pressure is slipping over the UK bringing settled and dry weather. Light winds before it moves away eastwards at the end of the week and the warmth extends northwards. Read the full update here

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