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General Volcanic Activity Thread!

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With eruption of Kilauea over for the time being it seems the Alaskan volcanoes have taken the challenge up

SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. Seismicity remains elevated and above background levels. Analysis of satellite data indicates the tephra cone within the crater of the north cone of Mount Cerberus has been partially eroded and a crater lake, about 90 m in diameter, now fills the vent. The satellite data further suggest the tephra cone vent has not erupted since October 1. No volcanic activity was detected by regional infrasound sensors over the past day.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.


VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Veniaminof volcano. Seismicity is above background levels and is characterized by low-level continuous tremor. Elevated surface temperatures associated with the lava flow at the intracaldera cone were observed in two mostly cloudy satellite images over the past day. Analysis of recent satellite data indicates the eastern part of the lava flow field on the south flank of Veniaminof remains active. Web camera views of the volcano have been obscured by clouds. No significant ash emissions have been observed or reported.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland volcano. Nothing significant has been detected in seismic and regional infrasound data. No activity observed in mostly cloudy satellite views of the volcano over the past day.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data. The web camera, one seismic station, and the local infrasound array are offline due to a equipment failure on September 23rd. This hampers efforts to rapidly detect explosive activity; however, Cleveland remains monitored with a single seismic station and regional instruments.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin volcano. Seismic activity remains above background. No activity was observed in regional infrasound data or in mostly cloudy satellite images during the past day.

Great Sitkin volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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Volcanic activity still continues at the Veniaminof Volcano.

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, October 23, 2018, 10:55 AM AKDT (Tuesday, October 23, 2018, 18:55 UTC)


VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Colour Code: ORANGE

The eruption continues at Veniaminof volcano and is characterized by minor lava fountaining and effusion of a lava flow from the cone in the ice-filled summit caldera. Seismicity consists of low-amplitude continuous tremor and satellite views of the volcano showed elevated surface temperatures from the active lava fountain and flow. Web-camera views from Perryville showed persistent steam emissions over the past 24 hours as well as incandescence at the vent in clear night-time views.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow A.V.O to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infra-sound, lightning, and satellite data.

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ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE

U.S. Geological Survey
Saturday, October 27, 2018, 12:14 PM AKDT (Saturday, October 27, 2018, 20:14 UTC)


SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The eruption continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. Over the past day, small explosions were detected in seismic data, the largest of which occurred at 5:10, 6:46, 8:57 and 14:03 UTC. No ash clouds were observed in satellite images but the volcano was obscured by high meteorological clouds with altitudes that ranged from 15,000 to greater than 25,000 ft. Additional explosions are possible and will likely occur without warning.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.


VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The eruption continues at Veniaminof volcano and is characterized by minor lava spattering and effusion of a lava flow from the cone in the ice-filled summit caldera. Seismicity consists of low-amplitude continuous tremor and satellite views of the volcano showed elevated surface temperatures from the active lava effusion. Diffuse ash emissions were observed in web camera images at times over the past day and the resulting plume typically dissipates rapidly. Ash emissions are typically not accompanied by an increase in seismic tremor and trace ashfall is possible in nearby communities if ash emissions increase under favourable wind conditions.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

Edited by Katrine Basso
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The east rift zone of  Kīlauea seems to be refilling so we may see some action in a few weeks time.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Activity Summary: Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week. Deformation signals are consistent with refilling of the middle East Rift Zone.

Observations: HVO monitoring during the past week shows low rates of seismicity at the summit and East Rift Zone (ERZ). Earthquakes continue to occur primarily at Kīlauea's summit area and south flank, with continued small aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 quake on May 4, 2018. Seismicity remains low in the lower ERZ.

In the ERZ, tiltmeters near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and farther east continue to record an inflationary trend, consistent with refilling of the middle East Rift Zone. At the summit, tiltmeters have recorded a slight inflationary trend.

Sulfur dioxide gas emissions at the summit averaged 50 tonnes/day as reported on October 24, and 75 tonnes/day at Puʻu ʻŌʻō on October 23. There was no sulfur dioxide detected by our instruments in the lower ERZ. 

Hazards are still present in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) eruption area and at the Kīlauea summit. Residents and visitors near recently active fissures and lava flows should stay informed, heed Hawaii County Civil Defense and National Park warnings, and be prepared, if necessary, to self-evacuate in the unlikely event of renewed activity. Please note that Hawaii County maintains a closure of the entire flow field and the vents and prohibits access to the area unless authorized through Civil Defense. 

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea's seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and the East Rift Zone. HVO will continue to issue a weekly update (every Tuesday) and additional messages as warranted by changing activity.

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LASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Friday, November 9, 2018, 1:01 PM AKST (Friday, November 9, 2018, 22:01 UTC)

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Low-level eruptive activity occurred at the intracaldera cone of Veniaminof volcano throughout the past week, indicated by relatively continuous seismic tremor, as well as by elevated surface temperatures and an eruption plume observed in satellite and web camera images. The eruption is characterized by low-level lava spattering, a lava flow, and variable emissions of steam and volcanic ash up to altitudes of 14,000 ft. Recent satellite observations show that the lava flow extends about 1.2 km (0.75 miles) from the vent. Fractures in the summit ice sheet adjacent to the lava flow are caused by melting. The production of volcanic ash varies over time and is rarely accompanied by a discernible change in seismic activity. Trace ash fallout in local communities is possible under strong wind conditions and increased ash emissions.

Mount Veniaminof volcano is an andesitic stratovolcano with an ice-filled 10-km diameter summit caldera located on the Alaska Peninsula, 775 km (480 mi) southwest of Anchorage and 35 km (22 mi) north of Perryville. Veniaminof is one of the largest (~300 cubic km; 77 cubic mi) and most active volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc and has erupted at least 13 times in the past 200 years. Recent significant eruptions of the volcano occurred in 1993-95, 2005, and 2013. These were Strombolian eruptions that produced lava fountains and minor emissions of ash and gas from the main intracaldera cone. During the 1993-95 activity, a small lava flow was extruded, and in 2013, five small lava flows effused from the intracaldera cone over about five months. Minor ash-producing explosions occurred nearly annually between 2002 and 2010. Previous historical eruptions have produced ash plumes that reached 20,000 ft above sea level (1939 and 1956) and ash fallout that blanketed areas within about 40 km (25 mi) of the volcano (1939).

SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

No eruptive activity was observed in satellite imagery or regional infrasound over the past week. The satellite link that transmits seismic data from Semisopochnoi failed on November 1, but an infrasound array on Adak Island should still detect significant explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi (with a 13-minute delay) if atmospheric conditions permit.

A return to eruptive activity remains a possibility at Semisopochnoi and it could occur with little or no warning. AVO will continue to monitor the volcano closely. Semisopochnoi is normally monitored with an on-island seismic network, the infrasound array on Adak Island, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors.

Remote Semisopochnoi volcano occupies the largest, young volcanic island in the western Aleutians. The volcano is dominated by an 8-km (5-mile) diameter caldera that contains a small lake and a number of post-caldera cones and craters. The age of the caldera is not known with certainty but is likely early Holocene. The last known eruption of Semisopochnoi occurred in 1987, probably from Sugarloaf Peak on the south coast of the island, but details are lacking. Another prominent, young post-caldera landform is Mount Cerberus, a three-peaked cone cluster in the southwest part of the caldera. The island is uninhabited and part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. It is located 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Amchitka Island and 200 km (130 mi) west of Adak.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Activity Summary: Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week. Deformation signals are consistent with refilling of the middle East Rift Zone.

Observations: HVO monitoring during the past week shows low rates of seismicity at the summit and East Rift Zone (ERZ). Earthquakes continue to occur primarily at Kīlauea's summit area and south flank, with continued small aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 quake on May 4, 2018. Seismicity remains low in the lower ERZ.

In the ERZ, tiltmeters near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and farther east reveal no change over the last week. At the summit, tiltmeters have also shown little change this week, with the exception of a small DI (deflation-inflation) event.

Sulfur dioxide gas emissions at the summit averaged 50 tonnes/day as reported on October 24, and 75 tonnes/day at Puʻu ʻŌʻō on October 23. There was no sulfur dioxide detected by our instruments in the lower ERZ.

Hazards are still present in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) eruption area and at the Kīlauea summit. Residents and visitors near recently active fissures and lava flows should stay informed, heed Hawaii County Civil Defense and National Park warnings, and be prepared, if necessary, to self-evacuate in the unlikely event of renewed activity. Please note that Hawaii County maintains a closure of the entire flow field and the vents and prohibits access to the area unless authorized through Civil Defense.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea's seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and the East Rift Zone. HVO will continue to issue a weekly update (every Tuesday) and additional messages as warranted by changing activity.

 

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