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dogs32

"thundery Rain"

  

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  1. 1. What is thundery rain?

    • Thunderstorm like rain, thunder HAS to be heard
    • Thunderstorm like rain possible without thunder
    • A very heavy shower but with no thunder
    • I DON'T CARE!!!!!!!!
    • Other
    • Proper thunderstorm
      0


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heavy thundery shower here...

edit.... didnt last long...short and sharp

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heavy thundery shower here...

edit.... didnt last long...short and sharp

Are you sure about the thundery bit ? No sign on sferics sites etc.

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no sferic's...just a quick heavy thundery shower

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Are you sure about the thundery bit ? No sign on sferics sites etc.

Thundery shower does not need to contain lightning/thunder to be described as such, but merely the nature of the precipitation as be thunderstorm like.

I don't like the expression being used as such as I find it misleading, and just generally non-sensical tbh, but that's how it is I suppose :(

Feeling quite good here to be honest - lots of hazy sunshine here and warming nicely!! :(

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no sferic's...just a quick heavy thundery shower

So you did hear thunder then, only it seems unlikely. If you heard it then that's a good sign.

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So you did hear thunder then, only it seems unlikely. If you heard it then that's a good sign.

like Harry said Thundery doesnt mean Lightning or Thunderstorm.....but intense rain often asociated with a a Thunderstorm...

just a very quick sharp heavy shower here...didnt last long but very heavy rain dropplet's

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Thundery shower does not need to contain lightning/thunder to be described as such, but merely the nature of the precipitation as be thunderstorm like.

I don't like the expression being used as such as I find it misleading, and just generally non-sensical tbh, but that's how it is I suppose :(

Feeling quite good here to be honest - lots of hazy sunshine here and warming nicely!! :(

Should the expression "thundery rain" not be be used with longer periods of thunderstorm like rain but no thunder, whereas thundery showers could indicate there was the odd rumble of thunder? I'm probably wrong but thats how i use it :)

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Thundery shower does not need to contain lightning/thunder to be described as such, but merely the nature of the precipitation as be thunderstorm like.

I don't like the expression being used as such as I find it misleading, and just generally non-sensical tbh, but that's how it is I suppose :(

Feeling quite good here to be honest - lots of hazy sunshine here and warming nicely!! :(

Sorry but thats Silly. A thundery shower has to have thunder, and hence, lightning. Otherwise it is just a shower.

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same here Ross....

to me and I think The BBC they use the expression to say the rain was very heavy...But it doesnt mean a TS

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Should the expression "thundery rain" not be be used with longer periods of thunderstorm like rain but no thunder, whereas thundery showers could indicate there was the odd rumble of thunder? I'm probably wrong but thats how i use it :(

For ***** sake !

How can a thundery shower have no thunder. Come on people !! Or are you just winding me up :(

same here Ross....

to me and I think The BBC they use the expression to say the rain was very heavy...But it doesnt mean a TS

No !! they don't. They use the expression "Thundery" to indicate the presence of thunder. This conversation is becoming surreal (rubbing my eyes and looking again to make sure i am not dreaming)

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For ***** sake !

How can a thundery shower have no thunder. Come on people !! Or are you just winding me up :(

Thats what i said so not sure why you are quoting me on that! I just said "I'm probably wrong" because i usually am :(

eDIT: The expression "Thundery rain" CAN be used to describe very heavy rain with no thunder.

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well I totaly disagree.....Thundery rain mean's rain like you would get in a Storm...Or in that case they would use Thunderstorm.....So a thundery shower is the next thing to a Storm...my opinon...and end off subject from me...as this is a convective discussion not a debate

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Thats what i said so not sure why you are quoting me on that! I just said "I'm probably wrong" because i usually am :(

The expression "Thundery rain" CAN be used to describe very heavy rain.

I think that you are confusing the difference between an, out and out, isolated thunderstorm, with the thundery activity associated with the embedded convection that often occurs within frontal systems. either way, lightning occurs and the sound is thundery.

So, i take it, there was no thunder heard in Cheltenham ?

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Well i would be delighted to kick things off in this new thundery argument.

Thunder, is the sound created by a lightning discharge.

If thundery rain is forecast then the forecaster expects there to be convection embedded in either a frontal rain band, or an MCS. He expects some lightning, somewhere. If conditions do not seem likely to produce convection sufficient to produce lightning, then he will forecast rain, heavy or light or whatever.

If a shower passes above an observer, and no lightning is seen or thunder heard, then it should be described as a shower. He can describe the rain as heavy, torrential, light, moderate, blustery, tropical etc etc but NOT Thundery, for obvious reasons.

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My last post form the other topic:

"Na, i'm not confusing them. I guess the fact is the term is quite vague, lightning can occur i guess yes. But what i mean is, that lightning could occur once and at the totally opposite end of a frontal band but you can still get the thundery rain at the other end and the full band is described as thundery rain. Therefore you can still have thundery rain without hearing thunder, If you get me."

Basically, i think of thundery rain as due to the intensity of the rainfall rather than there necessarily being any thunder.

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No. I think you'll find that the word 'thundery' (in this context) applies to the type of rainfall itself: i.e, sporadic in nature, sometimes torrential sometimes not and possibly accompanied by thunder??

IMO, it's quite possible to have 'thundery' rain but absolutely no thunder - anywhere?

PS: International Rescue calling John Holmes! :):(:(

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No. I think you'll find that the word 'thundery' (in this context) applies to the type of rainfall itself: i.e, sporadic in nature, sometimes torrential sometimes not and possibly accompanied by thunder??

IMO, it's quite possible to have 'thundery' rain but absolutely no thunder - anywhere?

PS: International Rescue calling John Holmes! :):(:)

This debate IMO is well overdue :(, but what I am about to say is based on personal opinion, not scientific/dictionary merit!

A thundery shower should be a shower containing thunder and lightning.

A thunder storm is a prolonged thundery shower (paraphrasing, lol)

Thundery rain is a prolonged period of rainfall (i.e frontal/zonal rainfall etc) with thunder and lightning. This should be discounted from a line of thunderstorms/showers which on the ground will give the impression of prolonged rainfall - i.e is in fact one shower/storm after another with little/no let up in precip in between.

The term 'thunder' obviously refers to the sonic boom created by lightning. Therefore, IMO, anything described as thundery should be just that, containing in some form thunder - be it frequent, sporadic or solitary!

You can get thunderstorms with no rainfall touching the ground, therefore I further discount the theory that thundery rain is rainfall that is torrential in nature, as this is not always the case with thunderstorms/showers.

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quite agree Pete.manyyyyyyyyyyyyy times i have heard the weather guy say thundery rain in nature.........can you have a thunderstorm in nature :(

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'Thundery rain'.....isnt that some rain thats a bit thundery??.... :(:(

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No. I think you'll find that the word 'thundery' (in this context) applies to the type of rainfall itself: i.e, sporadic in nature, sometimes torrential sometimes not and possibly accompanied by thunder??

IMO, it's quite possible to have 'thundery' rain but absolutely no thunder - anywhere?

PS: International Rescue calling John Holmes! :D:pardon::D

NO NO NO ! If rainfall is sporadic in nature, sometimes torrential but with no thunder, then it must be called sporadic, sometimes torrential rain. Why would the word thundery be used to describe rain with no thunder ?

This thread is becoming hilarious !

Please, Please would somebody on Netweather, back me up. I'm going crazy here.

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quite agree Pete.manyyyyyyyyyyyyy times i have heard the weather guy say thundery rain in nature.........can you have a thunderstorm in nature :pardon:

Quite, dogs. What would happen if a 'thunderstorm' (accompanied by tornadoes) whipped through at 50 mph? Would it be a 'thundery shower'?

IMO, it's the type of rainfall that the term 'thundery' refers to here; and not the presence or absence of thunder??

Never-the-less, an interesting discussion! :D

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NO NO NO ! If rainfall is sporadic in nature, sometimes torrential but with no thunder, then it must be called sporadic, sometimes torrential rain. Why would the word thundery be used to describe rain with no thunder ?

This thread is becoming hilarious !

Please, Please would somebody on Netweather, back me up. I'm going crazy here.

I can back you up Tommy (although I am not part of NW unfortunately). I agree totally with you - IMO Thundery should be used to describe a weather event containing "thunder"!!

I understand the argument, such that 'thundery rain' is rain (i.e JUST rain) which in nature can be likened to the downpour from a thunderstorm. However, my argument is not all thunderstorms produce a 'downpour' or 'torrential' rain - indeed some don't produce any rainfall on the ground!

At present, IMO, the term thundery rain is misleading and should be defined as an area of persistent rain incorporating thunder and lightning, as opposed to a defined cell/cells producing such.

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IMO, it's the type of rainfall that the term 'thundery' refers to here; and not the presence or absence of thunder??

So your saying, that every weather front that comes into the UK which contains heavy/torrential rain is 'thundery rain' then?

I agree with Tommy, thundery rain means it has to have thunder/lightning embedded inside the rain band otherwise its just normal heavy/torrential rain otherwise.

I think the term 'thundery rain' should be used less and instead forecasters should state that whenever the risk of thunder is possible in rainbands they should use the words 'Heavy or torrential rain with thunder in places'. Thats my thoughts on the topic personally.

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:pardon: I thought I cleared this one up for a few others that asked what the term meant. Firstly, the term is not official, it is used by forecasters to give a more accurate description of the 'intensity' of the rain.

When a forecaster uses the term 'thundery rain', he is referring to the intensity of the rain itself, in that it is similar to that of the intensity you would get in a thunderstorm, there does not need to be any 'thunder' heard.

When a forecaster uses the term 'thundery shower', it is similar to above, only it is a relatively brief insense downpour, the intensity of which is similar to that in a thunderstorm.

If there is a chance there will be thunder and lightning, the forecaster will say so, he's not going to say, thundery rain or thundery showers and expect everyone to know exactly what that means.

I hope this clears things up once more. :D

No it doesn't really clear it up for me Weather09

This is the BBC logo for thundery shower...seeing as this is probably the source of confusion for most people, would you be so kind as to email the BBC to advise they are misleading the general public, as thundery showers do not necessarily contain lightning :D

Seriously - Weather09, if you were a BBC forecaster would you lead your forecast with:

"Thundery showers in the East, with risk of thunder"

post-3790-12511148476994.gif

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