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Posted
  • Location: Manchester
  • Location: Manchester
    13 hours ago, JeffC said:

    Aye but it did that a week or 10 days ago, amounted to nothing...I'm not saying it will this time mind.

    Yes, it is obvious from their posts that the spaceweather people are keen to see a busy sun.

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    Just a few pics from early this morning at West Sands, St. Andrews  First one was 100iso eq @ f1.8 and 10 sec exposure, strong moonlight about midnight with the faintest of hint of an aurora.

    From Salon on the Isle Of Rum & The Isle Of Lewis tonight. Credit; Martin Keivers and Emma Mitchell.  

    More shots here from Scotland last night. Fingers crossed again tonight as there is another predicted Kp7 ☺

    Posted Images

    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
    4 minutes ago, karyo said:

    Yes, it is obvious from their posts that the spaceweather people are keen to see a busy sun.

    I think it's more to do with it being more interesting viewing an active sun than a quiet one.

    They love their solar flares..  

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet

    Spaceweather have confirmed that we have the deepest minimum since the 1913 cycle. Also that there is definitely a sunspot coming round. 

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    Posted
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hoar Frost, Snow, Misty Autumn mornings
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL
    1 hour ago, karyo said:

    Yes, it is obvious from their posts that the spaceweather people are keen to see a busy sun.

    Ham radio enthusiasts favour an active sun too, as it aids their hobby.

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
    11 hours ago, karyo said:

    Yes, it is obvious from their posts that the spaceweather people are keen to see a busy sun.

    Personally I'm quite happy with a quiet Sun!!

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Observed Flux Density 68.8

    Adjusted Flux Density 69.4 = very low.

    Panic over, SF dropped back!

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
    18 hours ago, summer blizzard said:

    Spaceweather have confirmed that we have the deepest minimum since the 1913 cycle. Also that there is definitely a sunspot coming round. 

    Interesting, we normally see an increase in solar flux when a sunspot is in the offing, but it waned back below 70 sfu...it will be interesting if it materialises.

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    And as if by magic...quite a jump in SF, so maybe that sunspot is on its way

    Observed Flux Density 72.5

    Adjusted Flux Density 73.1 = low

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    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset

    32 days blank, 188 for 2020, 71%

    Solar flux 79

    Thermosphere: 3.49

    What spaceweather thought was going to be a spot, turned out to be a plage. 

    I wonder how many more days can this spotless streak continue for?

    Edited by SteveB
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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
    15 hours ago, SteveB said:

    32 days blank, 188 for 2020, 71%

    Solar flux 79

    Thermosphere: 3.49

    What spaceweather thought was going to be a spot, turned out to be a plage. 

    I wonder how many more days can this spotless streak continue for?

    Sorry, read that as plague, I thought hell's bells the Sun's got Covid-19!

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Observed Flux Density 72.4

    Adjusted Flux Density 72.9 = low

    Note the differential between observed and adjusted is getting smaller as the earth's elliptical orbit bring it closer to the sun.

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    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
    4 minutes ago, JeffC said:

    Sorry, read that as plague, I thought hell's bells the Sun's got Covid-19!

    Predictive text put it as plague when I was writing it this morning,  had to go back and edit it🤣

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet

    33 days but we are about to generate at least one sunspot. Have we had a group yet opposed to singular.

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    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset

    33 days blank, 189 for 2020, 715

    Solar Flux 72

    Thermosphere: 3.51

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Observed Flux Density 73.4

    Adjusted Flux Density 73.7 = low

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashbourne,County Meath,about 6 miles northwest of dublin airport. 74m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Cold weather - frost or snow
  • Location: Ashbourne,County Meath,about 6 miles northwest of dublin airport. 74m ASL

    Well that long stretch has come to an end today with a sunspot.  I wonder would that be the last such long stretch of this minimum.

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    Posted
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hoar Frost, Snow, Misty Autumn mornings
  • Location: Near King's Lynn 13.68m ASL

    There was actually a brief spot that lasted a few hours on the 14th September that was counted by SIDC - but not Boulder - so breaking the streak in terms of their count. You can view it here:

    https://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/aiahmi/

     

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    Posted
  • Location: South Ockendon, Thurrock, SW Essex
  • Weather Preferences: Severe frosts, Heavy snowfall, Thunder and lightning, Stormy weather
  • Location: South Ockendon, Thurrock, SW Essex

    SOLAR WIND SPARKS EQUINOX AURORAS: A minor stream of solar wind is buffeting Earth's magnetic field, and this is sparking auroras around the Arctic Circle. "I just witnessed a nice outburst," reports Bernt Olsen, who sends this picture from Birtavarre, Troms, Norway:

    nitrogenfringe_strip solar wind sparks equinox auroas.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: South Ockendon, Thurrock, SW Essex
  • Weather Preferences: Severe frosts, Heavy snowfall, Thunder and lightning, Stormy weather
  • Location: South Ockendon, Thurrock, SW Essex

    Aurora from Eshaness Lighthouse

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Observed Flux Density 73.6

    Adjusted Flux Density 74.1= low

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Just thought I should remind the thresholds I'm using as suggested in April

    Below 70 = very low

    70-100 = low

    100-200 medium

    2-300 = high

    3-500= V high

    and the record 55,000 if it ever gets to that again in our lifetime we'll just call it extreme?

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    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset

    1 day blank, 190 for 2020, 71%

    Solar flux 74

    Thermosphere: 3.42

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    3 consecutive years with at least 200 spotless days looks a cert and 4 consecutive years of 100+ spotless days.

    Not sure if 1911-14 solar minimum achieved this but it did have a deeper trough, I think 1913 had over 300 spotless days.   

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    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet

    Yes, 1913 is the winning year at 311 and indeed it is the only other cycle in the last 170 years to produce 3 years above 200. It also had a sluggish start with 150 sunspots in 1914 in year 4 of its minima. It's worth saying that timing is a factor in making that cycle look deeper, our years 1 and 2 (2018 and 2019) were deeper so at 200 sunspots this year we'll only end up ~80 behind. 

    Technically the previous two solar cycles also had 4 years at 100+ but i tend to exclude them as year 1 in both cycles barely made it so in the satellite age they'd have been discounted. 

    The other odd strong cycle was the 1875-1879 minima which was notable for having 5 years at 100+. It also either has missing data for 1877 or had a strange double minima. 

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: wintry
  • Location: Coniston, Cumbria 90m ASL

    Observed Flux Density 72.8

    Adjusted Flux Density 73.1 = low

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