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North American Weather (U.S.A & Canada)

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talk about wild swings in temperature..i went to a meeting in Jasper for 10 am today when i arrived it was very mild and rainy and the temp was +16c when i left at 2pm it was snowing and the temp had fallen to -1c

some change that-this place would collapse if the UK got those changes in such a short time

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hi Cheeky Monkey,

WOW that is certainly not a subtle change is it. What a great place to live to see and feel something like that, that is proper weather. I did not realise that things could change that quickly, if our temps dropped like that we would think the end of the world was coming. I could not imagine temps like that in the morning then lots of snow a little later on. Our temperature was about the same as yours here in Bristol UK yesterday so I can only imagine that what it would be like to be digging the car out right now. UNBELIEVABLE. What a lovely place to live! Good luck to you for the winter.

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Hey Cheeky, thats crazy...looks like the jet stream dipped there and had some cold weather passing through...luckily it stayed north from here

Looks like the cold is sinking south...forecast zero for you and us it seems going into Monday...keep me updated if u get any snow...looks like we might get some upsloping here so 10cm could be possible but ground is prob still quiet warm after the past few weeks so not much might settle

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talk about wild swings in temperature..i went to a meeting in Jasper for 10 am today when i arrived it was very mild and rainy and the temp was +16c when i left at 2pm it was snowing and the temp had fallen to -1c

I assume you've heard of chinook winds? I think they affect southern Alberta mostly (Calgary, Lethbridge, and whatnot) rather than your area, but they can be responsible for some *pretty* wild temperature swings in winter. Now, I think I like the idea of a reprieve from winter cold in theory... just not sure about feeling cheated when it plummets back down to -20 immediately after. :p

Edited by Eabie

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Oklahoma City will still take some beating. A drop from 83F to 14K in less than 24hrs.

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no such ups and down in Edmonton though another mild day today up to 10c..tomorrow will be the last mild day...looks to be below freezing all day from Wednesday onwards with some snow here.

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I assume you've heard of chinook winds? I think they affect southern Alberta mostly (Calgary, Lethbridge, and whatnot) rather than your area, but they can be responsible for some *pretty* wild temperature swings in winter. Now, I think I like the idea of a reprieve from winter cold in theory... just not sure about feeling cheated when it plummets back down to -20 immediately after. :p

We live for that here in southern alberta. I've seen it go from minus 10oC to plus 10oC in less an hour, its so nice. However I've seen it do the reverse in just as short a time.....not so nice lol

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...looks to be below freezing all day from Wednesday onwards with some snow here.

Seems i spoke too soon forecast to stay mild for another week at least

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It was 14 or 15 C in Winnipeg this afternoon -- absolutely beautiful so far this November. October was also mostly dry and lovely... so except for a somewhat wet and chilly September, and a wind/rain storm in late October, it's been an exceptionally lovely autumn here. I'm still waiting for the show to drop though... :p

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November 11 (and the day before and after) is the anniversary of several memorable weather events in North America. Here's a commemorative post about several of them:

1) 1911: The Great Cold Front and Tornado Outbreak

2) 1913: The White Hurricane

3) 1940: Armistice Day Blizzard

4) 1975: "Edmund Fitzgerald" storm

5) 1998: The super-cyclone

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/weatherhistorian/comment.html?entrynum=5

Interesting stuff, enjoy!

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Big changes in the weather here today..right now +3c dropping during the day..looking at a high of -9c tomorrow as artic cold sweeps across the priaires highs around -15c by the weekend and lows between -20 and -25c by night :cold:

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Big changes in the weather here today..right now +3c dropping during the day..looking at a high of -9c tomorrow as artic cold sweeps across the priaires highs around -15c by the weekend and lows between -20 and -25c by night :cold:

Crikey! I bet that will come as a bit of a shock?!!

I love cold but that that must be horrible to cope with, I sippose that we're lucky here in that we usually only get a couple of weeks at a time of what you would call 'mild weather'? :D

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Big changes in the weather here today..right now +3c dropping during the day..looking at a high of -9c tomorrow as artic cold sweeps across the priaires highs around -15c by the weekend and lows between -20 and -25c by night :cold:

I see what you mean. An arctic blast behind a somewhat complicated frontal arrangement. Had a quick look at the recent chart for west Canada at 1200 UTC. It can only get colder. Rather you than me but then again I suppose Canadians are used to this.

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Big change for sure here - yesterday coming back from footie at 7pm it was 5oC...then the snow started about 9pm and at 7am this morning it was minus 7oC with about 3-4 inches of snow where I live (more like 1-2 inches down in the town)

Another storm is due to hit Wednesday night with anything from 10cm to 25cm so watch this space

Here is a good palce to view the action - 4 different webcams of in town here

http://www.canmorealberta.com/webcams/

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Big change for sure here - yesterday coming back from footie at 7pm it was 5oC...then the snow started about 9pm and at 7am this morning it was minus 7oC with about 3-4 inches of snow where I live (more like 1-2 inches down in the town)

Another storm is due to hit Wednesday night with anything from 10cm to 25cm so watch this space

Here is a good palce to view the action - 4 different webcams of in town here

http://www.canmorealberta.com/webcams/

bah humbug cc

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bah humbug cc

lol John - I'll send some in the mail :-)

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Cold arrived on cue and temps still falling..right now its -14c with light snow temp has fallen constantly since yesterday afternnon was -7c when i got up this morning and -12c by 3 pm will touch -18c by end of night...did not have much snow but further south got a bit of a pasting though.

Edited by cheeky_monkey

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Purely as a matter of interest had a glance at the Edmonton sounding for 00 UTC, The only time I recollect a similar sounding was at Larkhill during the 62-63 winter. And I sincerely hope we don't get a repeat.

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We're getting our first significant snowfall tomorrow as an Alberta clipper tracks eastward across the southern prairies. Environment Canada is predicting about 10 cm here, though 10-15 cm is likely in most areas (and hopefully here too).

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Well, we have quite a scattering of NW members across western Canada now. The arctic outbreak has generally avoided the coast so far but cooler air has filtered in here, it's about 3-4 C now and any showers around here today are likely to turn readily to hail (snow level has come down the coastal mountains to about 400m asl).

This satellite image can be animated, have a look and you'll see low pressure in the Pacific that hit the north coast of B.C. yesterday, then looped around and headed due south where it's going towards an eventual weekend position off the coast of Oregon well south of here (around 45 N, I'm at 49.3 N). You'll see how the more active frontal waves break off these Pacific lows and move inland across the Rockies to reform as separate lows in the northern plains states.

http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/satellite/animateweb_e.html?imagetype=satellite&imagename=goes_wcan_1070_m_..................jpg&nbimages=1&clf=1

So, if you came over for a bit of real winter, you'll cash in this season I think, with an arctic outbreak this strong in mid-November, get ready for the -40 stuff later on. But I am seeing signs of a mid-winter reversal to milder as the pattern shifts further east and allows the Pacific air to flood in across the Rockies -- that may be the second half of January into February, so a frigid first half of the winter and maybe not so bad second half.

Okay, I just ran that loop on the maximum time allowed (105 frames) and it's quite dramatic, I strongly urge you to have a look. And because I often get questions about the geography out here (from JH among others), here's a basic tour of the region that may help you out. See on the image the grid is every 10 degrees and you'll see the 50 N latitude hitting the coast about mid-way up Vancouver Island (so that establishes where Vancouver Island is). On land you don't see that latitude but you see the US-Canada border which runs along 49 N. So that helps you find B.C. and to the east, it's Alberta (AB), Saskatchewan (SK) and Manitoba (MB) then a part of Ontario (ON) and the beginning of the Great Lakes. This is where the border stops following 49N and follows a system of rivers to Lake Superior. Also out on the coast here, the border loops around the south end of Vancouver Island and out through the Strait of Juan de Fuca. And where is Vancouver? It's on the mainland, not the island, and basically just north of the international border, you'll see the delta of the Fraser River and the city has grown up all around that spreading inland now about fifty miles into the Fraser valley. A big part of the local climate is that cold air can come blasting out of that valley at times, and to the east of where I live is an area that sometimes gets 40-50 mph northeast winds and blowing snow in open areas, that tends to modify to 20-30 mph and snow flurries in the city here. To get that condition, you need strong high pressure over central B.C. and a low to the southwest of here.

North of these Canadian provinces, and north of 60 deg latitude, are the territories starting with the Yukon, then the N.W.T. and Nunavut. West of all that, Alaska, part of which is on this map grid, note the panhandle which runs down the coast as far south as 54 40' and then south of that, the Queen Charlotte Islands where that low was spinning around earlier. We now call that "Haida Gwaii" as it's the homeland of the Haida Indian nation. But anyway, that brings us back towards Vancouver Island which as you'll note is only separated from the mainland by a very narrow set of straits that in some places are only a couple of miles across. There are many smaller islands in these waters too and the ferry route north goes through many narrow passages to avoid the rougher open Pacific.

Now if you go south into the U.S., the states are Washington (WA), Oregon (OR) and California (CA) along the coast. Somewhat confusing to internet users, CA is also Canada. Inland, if you follow along the border, east of WA is Idaho (ID) and quite soon after that, Montana (MT) and North Dakota (ND) then Minnesota (MN).

You can also see parts of Wyoming, South Dakota and a few other states on this map. Wyoming is the rectangular one south of Montana.

Final note on the terrain, which shows up to some extent on the satellite imagery, moving inland from the Pacific (and this applies to both sides of the U.S.-Canada border) there are three mountain complexes, the Coast Ranges (becomes the Cascades in the U.S.), the Selkirks (become the Bitterroots that form the border of MT and ID) and finally the Rockies (the border of BC and AB then these run through western MT and west-central Wyoming into central Colorado). That last mountain range is where Rich is located. By the time weather systems cross all three of these ranges, they tend to lose a lot of their moisture, but then they regenerate in the plains states and suck up moisture from the south to replace some of what they lose. Systems that come in further north have less of a barrier and so they tend to come in with a bit more moisture. For one thing, they only have two mountain ranges to cross as the Selkirks and the Rockies tend to merge into one, and also there is a stretch where the Rockies are a lot less impressive to the north of about 55 N, although the Coast Ranges stay fairly massive all the way into Alaska.

Edited by Roger J Smith

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Well, we have quite a scattering of NW members across western Canada now. The arctic outbreak has generally avoided the coast so far but cooler air has filtered in here, it's about 3-4 C now and any showers around here today are likely to turn readily to hail (snow level has come down the coastal mountains to about 400m asl).

This satellite image can be animated, have a look and you'll see low pressure in the Pacific that hit the north coast of B.C. yesterday, then looped around and headed due south where it's going towards an eventual weekend position off the coast of Oregon well south of here (around 45 N, I'm at 49.3 N). You'll see how the more active frontal waves break off these Pacific lows and move inland across the Rockies to reform as separate lows in the northern plains states.

http://www.weatherof...bimages=1&clf=1

I strongly urge you to have a look. And because I often get questions about the geography out here (from JH among others), here's a basic tour of the region that may help you out.

thanks for that link Roger-should help my Canadian geography

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Nice linkage!!! ive just been on The Weather Network some pretty cold wind chill out there to -10 to - 25C Wind chill!! whoa! i want to experience something like that!!

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Maybe I could start some cold-chasing tours, it would cheer up the locals to find the economy getting a boost from people flying in to share in their misery. How does Jan 15-21 sound?

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Nice linkage!!! ive just been on The Weather Network some pretty cold wind chill out there to -10 to - 25C Wind chill!! whoa! i want to experience something like that!!

Want to see a really cold day? Look at the records for 1 February 1996 taken at Winnipeg airport: http://www.climate.w...r=1996&cmdB1=Go

Trust me, wind chills that extreme are not fun. lol. It rarely gets that bad, but I know a few years ago (can't remember the year) it was hovering near -50 wind chill, and if I took my mitt off, just a gentle breeze would cause my hand to go completely numb within seconds. It's awful.

Edited by Eabie

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lol, Roger thats a good idea, however I right now would love to do a sight seeing tour of the warm. 2 days of continual light and sometimes moderate snow with 6-8 inches in places and temps now, at 3pm, a chilly minus 15oC...welcome to winter eh

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