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Wildswimmer Pete

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Everything posted by Wildswimmer Pete

  1. Problem is, when you reach my age you mightn't live long enough to see the next summer, that's why this current run of lousy summers saddens me. If we are actually entering a Grand Minimum the next run of decent summers could be 20-30 years down the road.
  2. Looks like I'll be camping over the weekend not too far from you (St. Asaph) so hopefully that 23C forecast actually materialises. We've got planned swims in a lake (don't know which) and the sea (the latter I suspect at Abergele).
  3. Our summers are far more cloudier that previous, with the now semi-permanent infill between 8am-8pm. Check my reply to your post in the Model thread. Summers during the mid-1980s were showery and sometimes wet due to similar procession of lows, however the skies cleared after the low passed giving a day or so of fine weather before the arrival of the next one. Nowadays there's no clearance, the overcast persists.
  4. Here's the chart. That blob of green snot is the mortal remains of Hurricane Charley however it didn't crawl into its grave, instead it "bombed" just as it approached the British Isles. The result? Driving, very cold rain, gales and very dark all day. If I remember correctly, we just about made 48F (9C) - I was moaning at the time about experiencing such low daytime temps for summer. All of summer '86 was very showery however there were a few fine days during the continual procession of lows.
  5. Would that anomaly be linked with our "cold blob" in the nearby North Atlantic?
  6. Well, my take on today's conditions are as expressed in my post on the North West Regional thread: "What I thought was going to become another cloudfest turned out to be half-decent with long sunny intervals. However come lunchtime the wind got up and currently blowing an F7 gale - the trees themselves here are in motion with the trunks moving slightly. Despite the wind, I didn't notice any windchill when sunbathing topless. Liverpool ATIS reports 19C with a DP of 12C so the air isn't particularly humid." Notably stormy for August with that autumnal low crossing Scotland.
  7. What I thought was going to become another cloudfest turned out to be half-decent with long sunny intervals. However come lunchtime the wind got up and currently blowing an F7 gale - the trees themselves here are in motion with the trunks moving slightly. Despite the wind, I didn't notice any windchill when sunbathing topless. Liverpool ATIS reports 19C with a DP of 12C so the air isn't particularly humid.
  8. When discussing SAD while most studies come to the conclusion that the controlling factor is the intensity of light that falls on the retina during the waking hours. However some research maintains that skin exposure to bright light can moderate the effects of SAD. This isn't linked with the action of UV on the skin, it's a separate process - you don't need to use a sunlamp.
  9. That's even more insulting. Those of us (myself included) who are "moaning" are suffering from SAD which isn't normal depression. It's a condition caused by a neurochemical problem and it can't be "snapped out" of.
  10. Just posted this report under North West England regional weather reports: "After a dull start the rain started which kept on until around 1-2pm when it cleared. Presumably it was a warm front because although remained cloudy with a couple of bright intervals, the temp shot up to 23C. That was as measured using the accurate glass thermo I use for water temperatures. We went swimming in the Afon Dyfrdwy at Bangor-is-y-Coed followed by a pub lunch at the adjoining Royal Oak. Water temp 17C/63F which is about right for the time of year." OK it was in North Wales but not far from the Cheshire border (Afon Dyfrdwy = River Dee). Under usual circumstances today would have been regarded as overcast and pretty meh. Given what we've endured during the past two months today's offering was half-decent.
  11. After a dull start the rain started which kept on until around 1-2pm when it cleared. Presumably it was a warm front because although remained cloudy with a couple of bright intervals, the temp shot up to 23C. That was as measured using the accurate glass thermo I use for water temperatures. We went swimming in the Afon Dyfrdwy at Bangor-is-y-Coed followed by a pub lunch at the adjoining Royal Oak. Water temp 17C/63F which is about right for the time of year.
  12. Have recent summers become noticeably cloudier partially down to increased evaporation from the North Atlantic with generally higher SST's (ignoring the "cold blob" which seems to be affecting the position of the jet stream)?
  13. Jam next week? Like it's been since the beginning of June. In the meantime yet another trough will shove the warmth well away.
  14. However I suspect your office and living room at home are around at least 20C during the day. I'm living in that 15-16C throughout the day in my home and I can't really afford to switch on the CH during what's supposed to "summer". This summer has been the first one I can recollect with indoor temperatures so persistently low, and I've lived here for 37 years.
  15. Do you want to swap? I wish my bedroom would be warmer than 15-16C without my having to switch on the central heating (in what we laughingly describe as high summer!?). That's because of the severely depressed temperatures in my locality over the past few weeks, helped by the persistent overcast. I'm wearing shorts (as I do all year unless near freezing) however opportunities to sunbathe I can count on the fingers of two hands which is a sad reflection of our sunless "summer" - "sunless" during normal waking hours, not what sun recorders record while most of us sleep. Likewise it's been very seldom I can go out in a T-shirt, one of my fleecy hoodies has been the norm.
  16. Change of month, but no change by the lousy trough-dominated weather. Supposed to be "high summer", the reality, the old old, promising but chilly beginning, by 9am the infill has formed. As I type this the first drops of rain hit the window.
  17. .............and all the schoolkids in England and Wales are on holiday! A decent August was what we looked forward to when I was at school.
  18. Exactly as happened after the miserable summer of 1963, a gorgeous warm September that began on the Monday I went back to school - cloudless blue skies. That last weekend of the school holidays was absolutely vile, cold, heavy rain and windy. '63 was a "golden Autumn" mild enough for PT just wearing shorts outdoors on our playing fields.
  19. You didn't say anything to offend me! I can appear snappy but sadly that can happen through the typed word particularly as I don't usually use emoji. I like the fact that my recollection of weather past is is appreciated, although, yes, some (not all!) of it can be seen through a pair of rose-tinted glasses!
  20. I was a teenager through the 1960s, furthermore a stroke in 2011 trashed my short- and mid term memory however my long-term memory became even more keen. I've always observed the weather since my kidhood during the 1950s and I associate memorable "landmarks" during those two decades with the weather at the time. I have a very strong recollection of the 1950s, '60s and '70s. The '80s not so much, the '90s, Noughties and '10s, very little.
  21. I've mentioned in past posts that we may be entering a Grand Minimum which is contributing to our recent deteriorating summers. However the current chill and persistent overcast are borne on WNW or NW winds, replacing our usual SW prevailing wind. If I remember correctly past Grand Minima (Maunder, Dalton) ushered in prevailing Easterlies?
  22. Yet another very poor day from this sad excuse of a "summer" - chilly (currently 16C) and very dark, more like mid-winter, not surprising as Liverpool ATIS reports three layers of cloud - no doubt to ensure no sign of sunlight makes it to the surface. Meanwhile next week's expected warm spell has already been batted away. Why does the UK attract and retain troughs?
  23. The problem is down to the change of direction of the prevailing wind. Up to recently the prevailing direction of the wind was SW where orthographic lifting isn't so much of a feature, in fact my area was in the lee. However the prevailing direction is now NWN when the wind encounters the three escarpments at the end of the Mid-Cheshire Ridge (Runcorn Hill, Frodsham Hill, Helsby Hill) with very rapid lifting. Many times from a sunny New Brighton I've looked back down the Mersey to see the cloud forming over Frodsham, Helsby and Runcorn - just 12 miles as the crow flies.
  24. I find the appearance of green snot with a blue core near the UK on recent thickness charts unsettling. It really does look that August is yet another autumn month.
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