Jo Farrow

Senior forecaster
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About Jo Farrow

  • Birthday October 27

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    East Lothian
  • Interests
    Forecasting, Girlguiding, cycling, tennis, nature, baking,
  • Weather Preferences
    Not too hot, excitement of snow, a hoolie

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  1. It was included on the WMO list of cloud classification today, this is list is only updated occasionally and Asperitas has found its place. The same could be said for Volutus (roll cloud), it is just an expansion of the official categories to be useful and more detailed. Are you asking why it wasn't done in 1986/7 or in 1803?
  2. It seems to have been given the official name with an 'i' which maybe some Latin thing. Front page of the CAB website says Asperitas, but yes all same cloud
  3. Blog about the new cloud names http://www.netweather.tv/index.cgi?action=news;storyid=8052;sess=
  4. The official list of cloud types has been updated and issued online today by the WMO. Volutus, asperitas, flucus and flammagenitus to name a few. Read more here
  5. Any photos folks of : Volutus (or roll cloud) cataractagenitus , flammagenitus, homogenitus, silvagenitus and homomutatus. asperitas, cavum, cauda (often known as tail cloud), fluctus (widely known as Kelvin-Helmholz wave) and murus (known as wall cloud). A new accessory cloud, flumen, has been included. Commonly known as “beaver’s tail,” it is associated with a supercell severe convective storm to go in a blog explaining new cloud classifications
  6. More wintry weather is expected tonight with snow in places. There will also be rain, ice, wind and frost. Apart from a cold wind, SE Britain won't be too bad Read more here
  7. NWS don't use names for Winter Storms. If the winter storm - (unofficial US Stella) did deepen enough to get an Amber warning here in the UK (or Eire) then it would become our #StormFleur ex-Hurricanes keep their name, as they are officially named . This Storm naming only relates to autumn/winter/spring low pressures and their associated rain/wind/snow so not summer thunderstorm torrential rain
  8. If you are disheartened by the UK's lack of snow this winter, think of NE USA tonight as a huge snow storm heads in. #SnowDay Read more here
  9. A look at conditions at the 5 Scottish ski resorts and the weather for the weekend. Read more here
  10. When is the first day of spring, when does autumn begin? Read more here
  11. Met Eireann and UK Met Office are doing this Name our storms thing as a joint project. the whole list of names was issued last year, I posted the photo. The 2 met offices, only name a storm which will affect Great Britain and/or Ireland. If an Amber warning is issued for rain/wind or snow by UK Met Office (and yes Gael_Force this does then activate processes with councils and emergency services and transport providers) the MO name a storm for communication purposes, as a media tool and tell Met Eireann. If Met Eireann think the weather is going to be bad enough for their Orange alert, they will then take the next name from the shared list and name a storm, notifying the Met Office who share the info too. The low which didn't affect the UK, the one which some tabloids took it upon themselves to name as Doris, was always being watched with a wide spread of paths, which is why it didn't get an amber warning, only a yellow with low confidence. #StormDoris as an ID worked wonderfully last week and will be remembered and identified much as #StormDesmond was. The tabloids do this all the time, and I hope they have learnt their lesson. We'll await extreme/killer Easter weather updates from them, hot or cold.
  12. The Met Office never did name Doris early in Feb, that was certain newspapers jumping the gun, in their own usual hype to sell copy. http://www.netweather.tv/index.cgi?action=news;storyid=7978;sess= . They were very quiet this week when real Doris appeared. The level of severe weather warning Yellow/amber or red, and so naming of storms relates to the impacts of the wind not just the strength of wind/amount of rain or snow. I think the name storm process with Doris worked amazingly well, it was an ideal event for it. The next name is Ewan with an 'a', the list was made last autumn. The Met office is using Ewan, the list and how the naming process works is here http://www.netweather.tv/index.cgi?action=news;storyid=7682;sess= A storm will only be named when an amber alert is issued (orange in Eire).