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  • Location: Dundee
  • Weather Preferences: Snow, thunderstorms, gales. All extremes except humidity.
  • Location: Dundee
    4 hours ago, Geordiesnow said:

    Couple I can think of. 

    Whilst living in the NE, the forecasts for the 12th February 2009 was for a warm front to head eastwards without much rain on it but the front waved so it left SE Scotland and NE England having around 4 hours of heavy snow before turning to rain on the back edge. There's a video of it on YouTube with Rob McElwee admitting there was quite a bit more snowfall than they thought it would be. 

     

    That was one I remember quite well. It was forecast to turn to light rain here but stayed as snow throughout and gave us locally a fall of 16 to 18cms.
    Almost made up for the failed red warning of 2/3rd Feb when that pesky warm sector screwed up our forecasted snowmageddon.

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    Definitely remember Feb 15th  1978 Cheeky monkey. Forecast to be sleet turning to heavy rain but became s real blizzard that brought Dorset to a standstill the next morning. The same thing happened on

    27th Feb 2018, lovely gloriously sunny day, nothing forecast other than Scottish snow. I left work in the Northants sun, as I approached Leicester on the M1, the matrix signs were flashing 50...FOG. .

    We have a thread for snow storms that never were..but what about unexpected snow events that were not forecast? i have three examples from my childhood..February 15, 1978, Mid March 1979 (can't rememb

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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
    5 hours ago, Geordiesnow said:

    Couple I can think of. 

    Whilst living in the NE, the forecasts for the 12th February 2009 was for a warm front to head eastwards without much rain on it but the front waved so it left SE Scotland and NE England having around 4 hours of heavy snow before turning to rain on the back edge. There's a video of it on YouTube with Rob McElwee admitting there was quite a bit more snowfall than they thought it would be. 

    Another was down here in Morecambe a few years back. I remember the forecast was newsworthy as a ridge of high pressure was forecast to come in after a cold shot and there was talk of potentially breaking records for the UK lowest minimum but instead it was cloudy with heavy snow coming down from the North. i assume there must of been a shallow area of low pressure within the ridge and because the ridge came in slowly, the PPN was persistent but unfortunately not alot accumulated as it must of been quite marginal so surprising and frustrating at the same time. I think it was January 2017 but might be wrong on that but if you look at the pressure chart, you woukd never thought it was a chart that produced snowfall. 

    Highly doubt it was January 2017,  if we are talking records for UK lowest minimum temps, there was nothing particularly cold that month. There was a shortlived spell of snow - the only snow of the winter, but it wasn't very heavy, an inch or two at best. Struggling to think of when it might have been, possibly Jan 2010.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    14 hours ago, Geordiesnow said:

    Couple I can think of. 

    Whilst living in the NE, the forecasts for the 12th February 2009 was for a warm front to head eastwards without much rain on it but the front waved so it left SE Scotland and NE England having around 4 hours of heavy snow before turning to rain on the back edge. There's a video of it on YouTube with Rob McElwee admitting there was quite a bit more snowfall than they thought it would be. 

     

     

    Edited by Weather-history
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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    15 hours ago, snowflake said:

    February 6 1996... Fylde Coast

    I'll never forget it. Started falling gently early afternoon and just became heavier and heavier.  By early evening my husband had to walk home because his mini was stuck in the snow outside work. We went for a walk and just took it all in, it was breathtaking. Never in my adult life had I seen such heavy snowfall and we are still waiting for a repeat episode! Once in a lifetime event I reckon, especially here. I think the Fylde Coast is the least likely place for snowfall in the whole of the UK! Keep hoping.... 🙂

    Wasn't  unexpected though, it was pretty well forecast. I remember Ian McCaskill warning on the Friday of more wintry weather on the Monday. The Countryfile forecast warned of a wintry, snowy week. It started snowing here Monday afternoon but really set during evening and lasted into most of the next day.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire

    Weather-history - I hear what you're saying but snowfall of that magnitude was unexpected at sea level on the West facing Fylde coast. I spent 8 years living in Blackpool and saw only a smattering of snow one Sunday morning other than 5th/6th Feb 1996. It was said to be the worst snowfall in Blackpool since 1940 and I very much doubt that there has been anything similar in the 25 years since Feb 1996. 

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    Posted
  • Location: Wildwood, Stafford 104m asl
  • Weather Preferences: obviously snow!
  • Location: Wildwood, Stafford 104m asl
    2 hours ago, Weather-history said:

    Wasn't  unexpected though, it was pretty well forecast. I remember Ian McCaskill warning on the Friday of more wintry weather on the Monday. The Countryfile forecast warned of a wintry, snowy week. It started snowing here Monday afternoon but really set during evening and lasted into most of the next day.

     

    90's were good here, remember most events, but not this? must have missed out

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire
    51 minutes ago, A Face like Thunder said:

    Weather-history - I hear what you're saying but snowfall of that magnitude was unexpected at sea level on the West facing Fylde coast. I spent 8 years living in Blackpool and saw only a smattering of snow one Sunday morning other than 5th/6th Feb 1996. It was said to be the worst snowfall in Blackpool since 1940 and I very much doubt that there has been anything similar in the 25 years since Feb 1996. 

    Blackpool Evening Gazette, 6th Feb 1996 

    blackpool snow 1.jpg

    blackpool snow 2.jpg

    blackpool snow 3.jpg

    blackpool snow 4.jpg

    blackpool snow 5.jpg

    blackpool snow 6.jpg

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    Posted
  • Location: Lancashire
  • Location: Lancashire
    4 hours ago, Weather-history said:

    Wasn't  unexpected though, it was pretty well forecast. I remember Ian McCaskill warning on the Friday of more wintry weather on the Monday. The Countryfile forecast warned of a wintry, snowy week. It started snowing here Monday afternoon but really set during evening and lasted into most of the next day.

     

    This is brilliant. It was certainly forecast then. Usually though, these kind of set ups bring snow further inland, on the Pennines etc and skip the coast where it rains. I wonder what was different this time? 

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Efford, Plymouth
  • Weather Preferences: Misty Autumn Mornings, Thunderstorms and snow
  • Location: Efford, Plymouth

    Heres a weird one I don't remember- 8th and 9th December 1981. This is the HTV local news from Bristol- the upper air charts are only into -5 bracket as well on the reanalysis 

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire
    1 hour ago, snowflake said:

    This is brilliant. It was certainly forecast then. Usually though, these kind of set ups bring snow further inland, on the Pennines etc and skip the coast where it rains. I wonder what was different this time? 

     

    A very cold January and the stalling of the occlusion on the West coast as it came up against high pressure from the East 

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire
    1 hour ago, philglossop said:

    Heres a weird one I don't remember- 8th and 9th December 1981. This is the HTV local news from Bristol- the upper air charts are only into -5 bracket as well on the reanalysis 

    This was the start of the snowiest December of the 20th century with the first major fall affecting central and southern regions on the 8th (Philip Eden). I remember it was a nightmare getting to and from work in Surrey on the 8th, with councils caught out by this early snowfall and roads ungritted as a result.

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
    4 hours ago, philglossop said:

    Heres a weird one I don't remember- 8th and 9th December 1981. This is the HTV local news from Bristol- the upper air charts are only into -5 bracket as well on the reanalysis 

    8 Dec 81 was one of the unexpected snow events i opened this thread with

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    Posted
  • Location: wigan
  • Location: wigan

    Hi ! Just joined while looking browsing some Ice sheet updates. I may be new here, but I have been studying weather and climate since 1963 so Im pretty old. But my experience living through the sixties and seventies is second to none, so Im reasonably up with current events. However I was bought up most of my life in Analogue and basic principles. I don't take much notice of all these computers, they are far away from how I forecast and look at general themes.  I have always used Nature itself to forecast and look at pointers to trends.

    In  January 1963 We had on the South east Sussex coast  3 months of the most brutal weather i had seen as a 15 year old. Since those days i have seen my world and UK become a Mediterranean  climate. It can no longer be called the United Kingdom old climate I knew it from the 60's and 70's.

    its quite funny watching lots of people discussing 1996 weather, when most have no idea what a sixties winter actually was like living through it.  Snow was regular along most of the Sussex and Kent coast. because most of  our winter weather came  mainly from the East or South East out of Holland and Germany.

    I made my first home made instruments in 1963 to put in our garden on a wood box above 3 feet of snow in our Eastbourne garden. helped by school teachers who gave us some hints and drawings. It amazes me that actually the forecasting in the 60's through to 1980's was pretty well accurate without needing computers and all the rubbish that seems to accompany it now. Michael Fish's stick on pads were good enough for us, and in many scenarios, those forecasters were uncannily correct.  "If it said snow expected in  South east England by tomorrow morning"  ,That's what you got,:  NOT, maybe, chance of, dont know yet, to early to say, unsure of track.  Weather is nature its driven by nature not computers, no computer can forecast a natural complicated turmoil of jet Streams, low pressure and high pressure systems.

    Through my years of school and into work up to 1980 Eastbourne and Sussex had a lot of snow.  I know this cos I lived through the years, and we headed up to the south downs golf courses to ski, more times than I remember.  The railway station i worked in even in the seventies was always covered in snow almost part of every year, blocking out the sun making the station so cold had to use gloves to work.  cars were left at home or put on blocks till next spring, my vespa scooter i had to walk around with, instead of riding it, because of huge 6inch ruts of slush refroze by 6pm.

    Yes I have experienced Blizzards along the seafront so severe, you had to shelter because you just couldn't see anything.  The 1963 big freeze became my launch pad into meteorology, and past the 2004 film "The day after Tomorrow" Which got me interested in clocking ice sheet break away.  The last white Christmas i have had in the last 25 years, was in Richmond North Yorkshire, where we got snowed in with relations on boxing day in the nineties. But my times then were more interspersed with violent thunderstorms and water spouts in summer. Oh and yes in 1963 -1970 we had several snow storms with thunder snow.   

    The only concession to digital instruments is a GPS weather station and an outside hanging on the first floor kitchen wall the outside sensor. My days of living in a house had long gone  by 1989. I actually hate living in the North west, its truly has the worst climate in England, mild, soggy, foggy, no wind inland and dangerously low levels of sunlight in winter. We still get heatwaves though, courtesy of the expanding heat from North Africa that changes our normal south westerlies in Southerlies, and the cool east winds we enjoyed in summer in Sussex has long gone now.

    On closing my first post, I do worry, about an outbreak from Russia and watching a lot of Siberian air around high pressure of 1057mb. If the Vortex did collapse end of year and into 2021, Its frightning to think thousands will die, because unlike 1963, among the many power cuts we endured, we had several fuel sources. Electric, gas, parafin heaters, and what we all used coal fires, that in our guest house heated a back boiler, so we had hot water, and fire banked up at night, and parafin heaters on the landings.  It should be noted, that without thought, many dwellings now have just one source and thats all electric.  Thats one change i worry about in a severe winter when power lines are down, there is no secondary of third source of heat or cooking s. 1963 was an amazing winter, but we were never cold indoors, I just hate to think of the consequences of another one in this country with the lack of secondary fuel source in place to keep people not only alive but able to cook hot meals. thanks so much for reading Mike👍

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    Posted
  • Location: weston-super-mare, UK
  • Location: weston-super-mare, UK

    1st February 2009 - Birmingham, UK

    At the time, I remember snow was due to be forecast, but it wouldn't be until late in the evening / Monday morning. I wasn't convinced any of it was going to come off, and was due to meet an ex (we broke up the week before and were friends briefly until an argument) in the city centre of Birmingham to visit a museum.

    It was cold - I was in a warm coat and hat and the sun was shining. As soon as we got out of the museum, it started snowing. It was coming down thick but only sticking a little bit. This was an example of me getting totally effing wrong! We sheltered in a couple of shops (my Dad's birthday on the 3rd so I managed to get a present), and decided it was best to get back home before it got worse. Luckily, as the train route covered both of us (me - Lea Hall, ex - Coventry), we both got on the same train and I got off at my stop saying we'll arrange something in a couple of weeks. It was still snowing and coming down. It was then starting to get thicker on the ground. I think by 4-5PM, it stopped. I thought it would melt away by the morning.

    The weather forecast for the snow WHEN it was due (I actually watched the Countryfile weekly forecast to see what was in store) did come off. I went to bed about 11PM and it was coming down thick. I woke up the following morning to go to work, luckily I was covering for a morning at a local premises and it was like a Christmas card. I was woken up by excited kids playing out in their front gardens chucking snowballs. I posted my Dad's present after I finished from work. He's the lucky one being born in February (he was born 1963!!). 

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire

    7th - 8th December 1990 in the Midlands. I don't know whether it was unexpected but I got stuck in South London and couldn't get back to work in the North West for three days due to gridlock on the Midlands motorway network which resulted in many drivers being stuck for up to 48 hours. 42 cm of snow at Acocks Green. I recall my boss was not amused, South London and the North West being completely devoid of snow, and I ended up offering to take annual leave, an offer which was not needed once the effects of the snow were plastered all over the media!   

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    Posted
  • Location: Cheshire
  • Location: Cheshire
    23 hours ago, AmatuerMet1963 said:

    Its quite funny watching lots of people discussing 1996 weather, when most have no idea what a sixties winter actually was like living through it.  Snow was regular along most of the Sussex and Kent coast. because most of  our winter weather came  mainly from the East or South East out of Holland and Germany.

    Welcome to the site. I suspect there are plenty of people around this site who do have personal knowledge of the 1960s winters, when we were said to be entering a mini ice age, and yes, I am among them, being at grammar school on top of a Surrey hill during the brutal winter of 1962/3. The reason we were discussing 1996 was because the snow of 5th / 6th Feb  was heavy, prolonged and 'unexpected' in such quantities in a West facing sea level location such as Blackpool where I lived, hence the title of this thread. The same could be said of the snow of 8th and 11th December 1981 in the south of England which started the snowiest December of the 20th century. I am sure you are right in suggesting that we will not see the likes of 1960s winters again if trends continue, but let's not forget that Mother Nature can still play tricks on us, for example the winter of 2009/10, Nov / Dec 2010 and of course the more recent 'Beast from the East' in Feb/March 2018.   

    Edited by A Face like Thunder
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    Posted
  • Location: wigan
  • Location: wigan

    Hi Guys, thanks for chipping in with comments.  Interestingly 2010 was a La Nina year. Although didn't really see more than an inch or two in Blackpool at the time. "Most models indicate that the 2020/2021 La Niña is likely to be a moderate to strong event. ". However I'm not convinced on its own it will bring harsh winter to UK. Previous La Nina years going back many years, were not embroiled in anomaly busting global warming.

    However, on my studies of the Polar Vortex of late, its been suggested that so much warming is and has occurred, that the theory is, that it could increase the chances of The Polar Vortex collapsing due to wavy jet stream However Over the last 10 years, I have seen very little easterly Airflow either in Summer or Winter over most of Northern Europe. We are in a la Nino event now, but any effects probably wont really materialise until another 8 -10 weeks or so.  My readers on my weather page, were fascinated that actually late 1962, it was still mild, wild , rain, and nothing to suggest at that time, what was to hit us in late December 62 into January 1963

    So indeed nature can play tricks on us, but the tricks in my days were sort of expected or accepted.  These days since 2010 has changed vastly again, and I'm almost tempted to say the days of "Beasts from the Easts" may become a memory. There is cold back in Russia this year. Moscow last year had to import snow for christmas. This year the whole siberian area is back to pretty normal with lows of -32%.    Belarus has been bitter lately due to 1057mb giant High pressure system.  I get a really good feel of movements from Windy.com which I am a premier member of. Its TOS licence also allows people to use or capture their maps to use on their pages for presentation purposes, and love its 10 days projected global movements , currents and other pertinent data. catch up again soon👌

    Edited by AmatuerMet1963
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    Posted
  • Location: halifax 125m
  • Weather Preferences: extremes the unusual and interesting facts
  • Location: halifax 125m
    On 26/11/2020 at 16:48, AmatuerMet1963 said:

    Hi ! Just joined while looking browsing some Ice sheet updates. I may be new here, but I have been studying weather and climate since 1963 so Im pretty old. But my experience living through the sixties and seventies is second to none, so Im reasonably up with current events. However I was bought up most of my life in Analogue and basic principles. I don't take much notice of all these computers, they are far away from how I forecast and look at general themes.  I have always used Nature itself to forecast and look at pointers to trends.

    In  January 1963 We had on the South east Sussex coast  3 months of the most brutal weather i had seen as a 15 year old. Since those days i have seen my world and UK become a Mediterranean  climate. It can no longer be called the United Kingdom old climate I knew it from the 60's and 70's.

    its quite funny watching lots of people discussing 1996 weather, when most have no idea what a sixties winter actually was like living through it.  Snow was regular along most of the Sussex and Kent coast. because most of  our winter weather came  mainly from the East or South East out of Holland and Germany.

    I made my first home made instruments in 1963 to put in our garden on a wood box above 3 feet of snow in our Eastbourne garden. helped by school teachers who gave us some hints and drawings. It amazes me that actually the forecasting in the 60's through to 1980's was pretty well accurate without needing computers and all the rubbish that seems to accompany it now. Michael Fish's stick on pads were good enough for us, and in many scenarios, those forecasters were uncannily correct.  "If it said snow expected in  South east England by tomorrow morning"  ,That's what you got,:  NOT, maybe, chance of, dont know yet, to early to say, unsure of track.  Weather is nature its driven by nature not computers, no computer can forecast a natural complicated turmoil of jet Streams, low pressure and high pressure systems.

    Through my years of school and into work up to 1980 Eastbourne and Sussex had a lot of snow.  I know this cos I lived through the years, and we headed up to the south downs golf courses to ski, more times than I remember.  The railway station i worked in even in the seventies was always covered in snow almost part of every year, blocking out the sun making the station so cold had to use gloves to work.  cars were left at home or put on blocks till next spring, my vespa scooter i had to walk around with, instead of riding it, because of huge 6inch ruts of slush refroze by 6pm.

    Yes I have experienced Blizzards along the seafront so severe, you had to shelter because you just couldn't see anything.  The 1963 big freeze became my launch pad into meteorology, and past the 2004 film "The day after Tomorrow" Which got me interested in clocking ice sheet break away.  The last white Christmas i have had in the last 25 years, was in Richmond North Yorkshire, where we got snowed in with relations on boxing day in the nineties. But my times then were more interspersed with violent thunderstorms and water spouts in summer. Oh and yes in 1963 -1970 we had several snow storms with thunder snow.   

    The only concession to digital instruments is a GPS weather station and an outside hanging on the first floor kitchen wall the outside sensor. My days of living in a house had long gone  by 1989. I actually hate living in the North west, its truly has the worst climate in England, mild, soggy, foggy, no wind inland and dangerously low levels of sunlight in winter. We still get heatwaves though, courtesy of the expanding heat from North Africa that changes our normal south westerlies in Southerlies, and the cool east winds we enjoyed in summer in Sussex has long gone now.

    On closing my first post, I do worry, about an outbreak from Russia and watching a lot of Siberian air around high pressure of 1057mb. If the Vortex did collapse end of year and into 2021, Its frightning to think thousands will die, because unlike 1963, among the many power cuts we endured, we had several fuel sources. Electric, gas, parafin heaters, and what we all used coal fires, that in our guest house heated a back boiler, so we had hot water, and fire banked up at night, and parafin heaters on the landings.  It should be noted, that without thought, many dwellings now have just one source and thats all electric.  Thats one change i worry about in a severe winter when power lines are down, there is no secondary of third source of heat or cooking s. 1963 was an amazing winter, but we were never cold indoors, I just hate to think of the consequences of another one in this country with the lack of secondary fuel source in place to keep people not only alive but able to cook hot meals. thanks so much for reading Mike👍

    I can understand why you might disrespect a winter like 1996 when you are comparing it to 1963 but to say 'when most have no idea what a sixties winter actually was like living through it.' is a little disrespectful to a lot of winters since.Yes we have all heard about 1963 and i guess the likes of 1968 and 1969 would be next cold in line but there were other 60s winters that were nothing spectacular,notably 1960,61,64 and 1967.As for the 1970s as far as i am aware the 70s were almost devoid of any real snow and cold until 1976 and am sure the winters of 1981,1987,1990,2010,2013 and 2018 taking away 1963 would not be a world away from other 60s winters

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    Posted
  • Location: North Yate, South Glos
  • Weather Preferences: Extremes
  • Location: North Yate, South Glos

    One of the best ones I remember was here in South Glos during one of the cold winters of 2009 to 2011, I can't remember the exact date. I was living just north of Bristol and a cold dry evening and night was forecast. Around 8pm the radar picked up precipitation starting to form in the Bristol channel which steadily grew. Around 9pm heavy snow started falling in much of the North Somerset, Bristol, South Glos area. This continued for about four hours and ended up depositing around five inches where I was living. A classic streamer set up.

    This was just one of many snowfalls that winter in which we snow lovers were totally spoilt with lying snow for many days.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    I'm not sure the snow that fell during the early hours of 5th January 2010 was well predicted here. There was a possibilty of snow but I think the forecast underestimated the amount of snow, there was no warning given by Laura Tobin during the lunchtime forecast and the graphics suggested a wintry mix. 

     

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
    On 26/11/2020 at 08:45, A Face like Thunder said:

    Weather-history - I hear what you're saying but snowfall of that magnitude was unexpected at sea level on the West facing Fylde coast. I spent 8 years living in Blackpool and saw only a smattering of snow one Sunday morning other than 5th/6th Feb 1996. It was said to be the worst snowfall in Blackpool since 1940 and I very much doubt that there has been anything similar in the 25 years since Feb 1996. 

    Always bang on about this event, not bettered it since here. We had 18 inches. Started Monday late morning, stopped mid afternoon on the Tuesday. Remember waking up on the 6th and being impressed by how much more had fallen overnight.

    The high pressure to the NE held firm, and stopped the front from progressing eastwards, it ended up almost fizzling in situ, the airflow behind was from the NW, but pressure was rising hence there was no where for it to go, no forcing. Unusual set up.

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Leeds Bradford Airport
  • Weather Preferences: Warm & Sunny in Summer, Cold & Frosty in Winter, Thunderstorms
  • Location: Near Leeds Bradford Airport

    New Years Eve 2003, the day was cold but around 1700 it started raining heavily but it turned to snow a couple of hours later. By midnight we had a right dumping, we were only supposed to get sleet I think. The day after was really mild though and it had all gone by evening.

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  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
  • Location: Windermere 120m asl
    2 minutes ago, Summer18 said:

    New Years Eve 2003, the day was cold but around 1700 it started raining heavily but it turned to snow a couple of hours later. By midnight we had a right dumping, we were only supposed to get sleet I think. The day after was really mild though and it had all gone by evening.

    Yes, have some recollections of a bit of wet snow that evening, I was in Newcastle upon Tyne. We had a run of wintry New Years Eves in the 00-03 period:

    New year eve 2000 - band of snow moved into the cold air, a thaw took place in the early hours

    New year eve 2001 - very cold, sharp frost with snow on the ground

    New year eve 2002 - as described

    New year eve 2003 - wintry showers, there was general snow on the 2nd, very icy

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    personally im going to throw in Dec 8 1990 ..i was living in Chelmsford at the time no snow was forecast but we got a good 4-6 inches out of it..i actually played football that day being a Saturday.. 5-0 home win against Witham for the footie fans out there

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    Posted
  • Location: Cambridge
  • Weather Preferences: Each season has its own merits but, since you press me, heavy snow
  • Location: Cambridge

    I can vouch for that CM. I too played on that day in Cambridge. Began the match with the oddest very large but scattered raindrops falling, and finished the game with 2” of snow on the ground. Surprised we were able to finish. I found the snow inspired me and I bagged a brace in a 4-2 win! 

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