Jump to content
Cold?
Local
Radar
Snow?

Recommended Posts

Posted
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl

    RAS currently giving a presentation on the discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus - this, like molecular oxygen is a key biomarker gas (an indicator of life).

    https://astronomynow.com/2020/09/14/watch-todays-major-announcement-from-the-royal-astronomical-society/

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 2
    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Spotted a post you think may be an issue? Please help the team by reporting it.
    Posted
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
    • 4 months later...
    On 14/09/2020 at 18:06, swebby said:

    RAS currently giving a presentation on the discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus - this, like molecular oxygen is a key biomarker gas (an indicator of life).

    https://astronomynow.com/2020/09/14/watch-todays-major-announcement-from-the-royal-astronomical-society/

    I don`t think that the theory about the life on Venus is possible. This planet has extremely high pressure and more important high temperature that makes possibility of life on this planet impossible.

    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Posted
  • Location: Hinckley, Leicestershire 123m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Snow (Mostly)
  • Location: Hinckley, Leicestershire 123m ASL
    12 minutes ago, bearnard18 said:

    I don`t think that the theory about the life on Venus is possible. This planet has extremely high pressure and more important high temperature that makes possibility of life on this planet impossible.

    Basic bacterial life could potentially survive harsher environments such as Venus - pressure and temperature. Still theoretical!

     

    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    15 minutes ago, B-C said:

    Basic bacterial life could potentially survive harsher environments such as Venus - pressure and temperature. Still theoretical!

     

    I assume that bacterial life could potentially survive deep in the ground of Venus. Such point might be possible. I don`t think that Venus - pressure and temperature are still theoretical. It`s easy to explain. The atmosphere of Venus is the layer of gases surrounding Venus. It is composed primarily of carbon dioxide and is much denser and hotter than that of Earth. The temperature at the surface is 740 K (467 °C, 872 °F), and the pressure is 93 bar (1,350 psi), roughly the pressure found 900 m (3,000 ft) underwater on Earth.

    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Posted
  • Location: Hinckley, Leicestershire 123m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Snow (Mostly)
  • Location: Hinckley, Leicestershire 123m ASL
    19 minutes ago, bearnard18 said:

    I assume that bacterial life could potentially survive deep in the ground of Venus. Such point might be possible. I don`t think that Venus - pressure and temperature are still theoretical. It`s easy to explain. The atmosphere of Venus is the layer of gases surrounding Venus. It is composed primarily of carbon dioxide and is much denser and hotter than that of Earth. The temperature at the surface is 740 K (467 °C, 872 °F), and the pressure is 93 bar (1,350 psi), roughly the pressure found 900 m (3,000 ft) underwater on Earth.

    Possibility of life in clouds, and at layers in atmosphere. Quite a few articles out there. All yet to be proven or disproven. 

    manoa-ifa-nasa-venus-wide.jpg
    WWW.SMITHSONIANMAG.COM

    Astronomers have detected a chemical in Venus’ atmosphere that signifies life on Earth. Could it mean the same on Venus?

     

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1
    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    • 5 weeks later...
    On 16/01/2021 at 14:30, B-C said:

    Possibility of life in clouds, and at layers in atmosphere. Quite a few articles out there. All yet to be proven or disproven. 

    manoa-ifa-nasa-venus-wide.jpg
    WWW.SMITHSONIANMAG.COM

    Astronomers have detected a chemical in Venus’ atmosphere that signifies life on Earth. Could it mean the same on Venus?

     

    The comparing Mars and Venus  tells that Mars is much more better place for humans to live. Even if that was possible (switching orbit and the removal of H2SO4) , the atmosphere of Venus is around 91× denser than Earth's atmosphere, with other words, the air pressure is around 92 bar. Besides that Venus lacks a planetary magnetic field, has a very thin ozon-layer and worst of all: it rotates the wrong direction!
    So from all the planets in our solarsystem, Mars is still the most survivable. Mars lacks a magnetosphere, so solarwinds can cause a problem. But with a normal Moon-spacesuite, humans should be able to survive on Mars.

    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Posted
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
    7 hours ago, bearnard18 said:

    The comparing Mars and Venus  tells that Mars is much more better place for humans to live. Even if that was possible (switching orbit and the removal of H2SO4) , the atmosphere of Venus is around 91× denser than Earth's atmosphere, with other words, the air pressure is around 92 bar. Besides that Venus lacks a planetary magnetic field, has a very thin ozon-layer and worst of all: it rotates the wrong direction!
    So from all the planets in our solarsystem, Mars is still the most survivable. Mars lacks a magnetosphere, so solarwinds can cause a problem. But with a normal Moon-spacesuite, humans should be able to survive on Mars.

    Of all the rocky/solid bodies in the solar system, the surface of Venus is undoubtedly the most hostile to a human landing.  Even the robust unmanned probes that have landed there succumb to conditions within hours. The Jovian moon Io is probably second in terms of hostile environment, but that's more to do with the strong radiation field of Jupiter.

    The mid/upper layers of Venus however might be tolerable for simple extromophile organisms.

    • Like 1
    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    12 hours ago, swebby said:

    Of all the rocky/solid bodies in the solar system, the surface of Venus is undoubtedly the most hostile to a human landing.  Even the robust unmanned probes that have landed there succumb to conditions within hours. The Jovian moon Io is probably second in terms of hostile environment, but that's more to do with the strong radiation field of Jupiter.

    The mid/upper layers of Venus however might be tolerable for simple extromophile organisms.

    The surface of Venus might be more tolerable for simple extremophile organisms or even for humans but the pressure and high temperature makes it impossible even to send crewed mission there. There are a lot of similarities between Earth and Venus but if we wanna talk about crewed mission on another planet, Mars is a better place to survive, notwithstanding the harsh environment and high level of radiation. 

    • Like 1
    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    According to some sources the Earth-like planet was found. "Earth Like Planet Found orbiting Proxima Centauri" by Al Paslow, published Sept.1, 2016; updated June 12, 2017, Mystic Sciences. Amazing detailed online article with artist illustration

    eso1629a-European-Southern-Observatory.j
    MYSTICSCIENCES.COM

    This artist’s impression shows a view of the surface of the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the...

     

    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now
    • Cold waves hitting Europe continue to threaten growers, is there a link to climate change?

      Much of Europe, not just the UK, has experienced unseasonably cold weather since the Easter Weekend. A plunge of cold arctic air brought by northerly winds early last week brought several nights of frost and even snow across large swathes of Europe, followed by another wave of cold arctic air spreads across much of Europe this week. The frosts causing damage to new growth in vineyards and orchardsa0spurred on by a late March heatwave, the vineyards of France werea0particularly badly affected.

      Nick F
      Nick F
      Latest weather updates from Netweather 3

      High pressure rules, but still chilly out the sun & watch out for a few showers

      High pressure in charge for the rest of the week but the airmass will be chilly, so feeling nippy out of the sun. Not entirely dry either, with scattered showers around the next few days, especially in the west. Read the full update here

      Netweather forecasts
      Netweather forecasts
      Latest weather updates from Netweather

      You'll need your coat because it's still cold out of the sun

      More April snow for Monday morning with a widespread frost. If you have outdoor plans this week, the chill in the air remains especially once the sun goes down. Read the full update here

      Netweather forecasts
      Netweather forecasts
      Latest weather updates from Netweather
    • Recently Browsing   0 members

      No registered users viewing this page.

    ×
    ×
    • Create New...