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Most days with lying snow during a mild winter?

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One quirk about this winter is that despite the predominance of mild spells, I actually have seen 6 days of lying snow this winter including 5 on the trot. 

Its the most I have seen during a meterological winter that has been so mild overall. 

That is 1 more than I saw during winter 2008-09 which was colder by a margin to this winter.

 

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Taking a mild winter to mean one which is at least 1.0c above the 30 year mean my own stats reveal that the winter of 2004/05 had the most mornings with lying snow at 15, followed by 1989/90 with 14 and thirdly 2018/19 with 13. 

There were 7 other winters meeting the criteria since 1977/78 but none of them managed 10 mornings with lying snow.

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I`ve only got half records of 1989-90 so that's knocked out about 6 or 7 in 1990.

10 days this winter all happened this side Christmas.

2004/05 got around 15 as I can make out.

2017/18 a clear winner at 30 days ending February 28th of course.

 

Edited by Snowyowl9

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From memory, winter 2006/07 stands out for me. I live in South London, so lying snow is rare, but we managed at least two mornings of lying snow in January and February, despite the winter being one of the mildest ever. This is about as good as it gets most years. We managed a couple of mornings in 04/05 despite a high number of days with snow falling. We didn't have any lying snow in 05/06 and only one morning in 07/08 and that was in April. No mornings of lying snow this winter. 

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Other mild winters I would say they were mild going by TM if these count.

2002.03 with 15.

2003/04 with 18.

Second which was a good year from the atlantic 2014/15 with 19 so that comes 2nd.

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In South Tyneside (where I spent most of my life, but I've moved around a bit) it was 2003/04, which had 10 days of lying snow, including 4cm on 22 December, about 7cm on 28-29 January and about 11cm on 28 February, which may have been the deepest snow in the area at that time since February 1991 (although of course exceeded by a large margin in 2010).

1998/99 was the second snowiest mild winter with 8 days, but on that occasion only 9 February (5cm) had a depth greater than 2cm.  As in 2003/04, northerly outbreaks during an otherwise westerly-dominated winter were the culprit.

I don't think 2018/19 would have challenged those two in the Tyneside area as to my knowledge snow was only lying there during the first three days of February.

I imagine it's probably unusual for Exeter to get any lying snow in a winter this mild (yes, there was some here on 31 January, giving about 80% cover at 0900 on 1 February) but I recall reading posts from someone at Exeter University who reported lying snow there in late February 2004.

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For a winter that was mild overall, with the cold spells being mostly very dry, it would have to be 2001/2 which produced 7 days with lying snow from only 5 with snow falling. It was fortunate in that the one significant snowfall (2cm on 30 Dec) was followed immediately by the coldest spell of the winter, with ice days and -10C minima that enabled it to stay on the ground despite only being a fairly small amount. 

I would agree with 2003/4 in Tyneside, I was up there then and that winter seemed very snowy considering it had mild wet rubbish for 90℅ of January, then that really mild spell at the start of February. The other days, however, were memorable- especially that late Feb spell which at the time was the most snow I'd seen since December 1995 down here.

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 2017/18 has been disqualified not mild.

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