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Is litter getting worse?

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Just now, jethro said:

I agree trees can be a problem, but I'd wager far more saplings get eaten by wildlife than escape and grow to be a problem. The flip side is every stone wall belongs to someone, I doubt anyone sensible would let a self sown sapling grow unchecked against their house. so why let it grow against a wall? Hedging and ditching used to be standard farming practise during winter, as did an annual check of boundary walls. I know farmers are busy but time spent (just once a year) walking their boundaries, inspecting their walls and pulling out saplings as they went, would pay dividends in the long run.

I'd agree regarding management of saplings, but the point being the saplings grow in the verge, responsibility of Highways dept, walls are owned and responsibility of farmer or landowner... ūüôĄ¬†

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Just now, JeffC said:

I'd agree regarding management of saplings, but the point being the saplings grow in the verge, responsibility of Highways dept, walls are owned and responsibility of farmer or landowner... ūüôĄ¬†

I question that actually, if you're talking country lanes (which I presume you are) the farmers are usually contracted to cut the verges and hedges. Even if they're not, in my opinion, only a numpty would ignore a sapling growing against their wall. Leaving it to grow to the point it causes damage, then blaming the council for not cutting it down, is just another fine example of the modern malaise of everything being someone else's fault - what happened to personal responsibility?  Literally a once a year check is all it would take, how hard is that? Costs a lot of time and money to repair a stone wall, isn't it quicker and cheaper to do an annual check?

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9 hours ago, jethro said:

Urban verges are vital to wildlife, what you see as useless weeds are foodstuff for many species.

depends where they are... theres no one blanket solution, and it does depend upon what weeds are actually growing there. dock and mugworth for eg doesnt have the same wildlife value as ragworth or dandelions. a busy , polluted verge is no good to anything, whilst verges next to green areas/hedges etc will have far more value. i have a history in conservation, so i do understand the various values of weeds, but the context of these verges is what makes them valuable or not to wildlife .

as it happens, im trying to get a bank in our village set to wildflowers. it could be a great feature.

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6 minutes ago, mushymanrob said:

depends where they are... theres no one blanket solution, and it does depend upon what weeds are actually growing there. dock and mugworth for eg doesnt have the same wildlife value as ragworth or dandelions. a busy , polluted verge is no good to anything, whilst verges next to green areas/hedges etc will have far more value. i have a history in conservation, so i do understand the various values of weeds, but the context of these verges is what makes them valuable or not to wildlife .

as it happens, im trying to get a bank in our village set to wildflowers. it could be a great feature.

Ragwort is toxic as are the cinnabar  caterpillars  on them ,councils have a duty to remove it 

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54 minutes ago, jethro said:

I question that actually, if you're talking country lanes (which I presume you are) the farmers are usually contracted to cut the verges and hedges. Even if they're not, in my opinion, only a numpty would ignore a sapling growing against their wall. Leaving it to grow to the point it causes damage, then blaming the council for not cutting it down, is just another fine example of the modern malaise of everything being someone else's fault - what happened to personal responsibility?  Literally a once a year check is all it would take, how hard is that? Costs a lot of time and money to repair a stone wall, isn't it quicker and cheaper to do an annual check?

Believe me, as a parish Councillor with the highways portfolio, nobody takes any care of the verges hereabouts save what the PC can get done by paying contractors. Farmers are largely tenants of the National Trust (there's another loong story!) and struggling, highways have sod all cash and have now taken about two years to set up lengthsman agreements but so far have achieved erm nowt...those lengthsmen would be paid for by the Parish Council out of the precept. 

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5 minutes ago, Mokidugway said:

Ragwort is toxic as are the cinnabar  caterpillars  on them ,councils have a duty to remove it 

Council as in district or County... Both are shambolic hereabouts, District being the better of the two. National park could or should be a good thing but potless and ineffective. 

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1 minute ago, JeffC said:

Council as in district or County... Both are shambolic hereabouts, District being the better of the two. National park could or should be a good thing but potless and ineffective. 

I think it falls to local council to remove ,do they .. No 

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Just now, Mokidugway said:

I think it falls to local council to remove ,do they .. No 

It ain't parish, so either district/Borough or county

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Until the mentality of the dirty lazy people who chuck litter changes, things will never improve. It's horrendous around here and I suspect the majority don't really notice it anymore! Trees/bushes at the sides of even country roads contain litter and those busier roads are bordered by what are basically litter trees.

As a cyclist it amazes me how the hedgerows along quiet country lanes are full of tin drink cans! Literally dozens and dozens over short stretches.

Bin collection days.....gale force winds the night before and many stupid people putting out recycling bin the night before even though bin won't be collected until after noon the next day! Result is streets full of paper/plastic. Basic common sense is missing.

Too many people who don't care then educate their kids to do exactly the same.

It's a shame as we live in a beautiful part of the world.

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7 hours ago, Mokidugway said:

Ragwort is toxic as are the cinnabar  caterpillars  on them ,councils have a duty to remove it 

ragworth is only toxic to horses if they eat enough of it. theres no recorded human casualties in think..

it is a composite flower, and as such is rich in nectar, meaning its very useful to wildlife.

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9 hours ago, Mokidugway said:

Ragwort is toxic as are the cinnabar  caterpillars  on them ,councils have a duty to remove it 

I'm torn on the Ragwort, yes it's very toxic and as a farmer's daughter there is a part of me that cringes when I see it. It used to be a notifiable weed and you were legally required to remove it but that changed long ago. I wouldn't let it grow in a field where there is livestock as it's just asking for trouble, but as a verge side plant, there's no doubt it's a valuable food source, especially to bees. We can't totally get rid of things just because they're toxic, there's so many things that we'd lose; every part of a foxglove is deadly poisonous, daffodil bulbs will kill you if you eat them, ditto rhubarb leaves, so many things.

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9 hours ago, JeffC said:

Believe me, as a parish Councillor with the highways portfolio, nobody takes any care of the verges hereabouts save what the PC can get done by paying contractors. Farmers are largely tenants of the National Trust (there's another loong story!) and struggling, highways have sod all cash and have now taken about two years to set up lengthsman agreements but so far have achieved erm nowt...those lengthsmen would be paid for by the Parish Council out of the precept. 

Tenant farmers (even National Trust ones) are liable to maintain stock proof boundaries, they really should be inspecting their walls and removing saplings before they become a problem, at least annually.

We've got a lengthsman here too, not entirely sure what he does but I think it's up to residents to make a request to the parish council (could be wrong). We are however blessed with farmers who cut the hedges and repair the walls, and we have a community litter pick twice a year. I suppose despite having a population equally divided between young and old here, we function on a more old fashioned basis of 'it's our community, we'll all look after it', everyone is happy to do their bit.

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3 hours ago, jethro said:

Tenant farmers (even National Trust ones) are liable to maintain stock proof boundaries, they really should be inspecting their walls and removing saplings before they become a problem, at least annually.

We've got a lengthsman here too, not entirely sure what he does but I think it's up to residents to make a request to the parish council (could be wrong). We are however blessed with farmers who cut the hedges and repair the walls, and we have a community litter pick twice a year. I suppose despite having a population equally divided between young and old here, we function on a more old fashioned basis of 'it's our community, we'll all look after it', everyone is happy to do their bit.

It's sort of like that here but it gets expensive to repair dry stone walls so they tend to pop a fence up on any wall gaps. 

Very much an ageing population here too as many of the houses are now holiday lets and jobs are mainly tourism based and pay very basic.... 

Criminal really... 

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Need to get away from plastic packaging... thats the answer - use biodegradable products! Nothing else will stop it until that happens. Yes there will still be litter but stuff that degrades... 

Also depends which area you are from as to the local authorities clean-up efforts - the posher areas are often cleaner!  

Edited by Matty88

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Well after I tweeted the council they promised they'd get it sorted. Lets see if they do. Not holding my breath.

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We used to get a sweet old man do the garden beds in the village and keep the bushes in check and he was replaced with a couple of loudmouthed youths sitting on mowers who only do stuff if you speak to the council. Our village also does litter pickups and does the planting the old man would of done.

Amazing that they get rid of 1 man who happily planted and weeded and cut lawns for 2 who just cut lawns.

 

 

Edited by Dami

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Fly tipping is a huge problem with over 1'000'000 incidents are reported annually. Farmers can be worst hit if the tipping happens on their own land. Criminal gangs operate a cunning scheme whereby they appear legit, have all the right documents but instead of taking the waste to the tip or the recycling plant, they just dump it. So you think you are paying a legit company and are paying more for the prevelige. The only way to avoid this is to have certification of correct disposal and dont pay them till you get proof they took it to the right place.

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