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Summer 2018 - Moans, Ramps, Chat etc

Paul

Please ensure you stick to the forum guidelines when using this thread, particularly when it comes to discussing weather preferences:

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Weather Guilt-Tripping - Please don't suggest people are selfish for enjoying or even looking forward to a certain weather type. Everyone has different weather preferences, but since none of us can control the weather, no-one should be made to feel guilty or foolish for liking it.

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disappointed those phantom southeasterlies that some had predicted arent coming to fuition.. :(

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1 hour ago, mushymanrob said:

indeed, we had hotter days in 2015 for eg.. or should that be 'day'?..

Same here in London. 

Personally I think it was the never ending monotonous tedium of it that will be memorable. 

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On 06/09/2018 at 07:50, mushymanrob said:

disappointed those phantom southeasterlies that some had predicted arent coming to fuition.. :(

Yes and me, my location Tuesday looks a washout, 13 degrees, not good for summer

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10 minutes ago, I remember Atlantic 252 said:

Yes and me, my location Tuesday looks a washout, 13 degrees, not good for summer

Good job its not summer then.

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From right to left; Helene, Isaac, Florence (18:00 UTC yesterday).  Could these storms increase the risk of an unsettled autumn back home?

2018_9_9_1800_MSG4_16_S4.jpeg

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On 07/09/2018 at 18:54, Weather-history said:

Good job its not summer then.

Officially it still is.  Statistically speaking no.

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6 hours ago, Evening Star said:

Officially it still is.  Statistically speaking no.

Officially for me, its over. 

 

Edited by Weather-history

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21 minutes ago, Weather-history said:

Officially for me, its over. 

 

 I think the astronomical definition is daft. It surely should be the period where the sun is at highest and strongest, the greatest period of daylight of the year and that is between Beltane (7th May) and Lughnasadh (7th August).  That to me, makes logically sense. After all we are talking astronomically not meteorologically here

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5 hours ago, Weather-history said:

 I think the astronomical definition is daft. It surely should be the period where the sun is at highest and strongest, the greatest period of daylight of the year and that is between Beltane (7th May) and Lughnasadh (7th August).  That to me, makes logically sense. After all we are talking astronomically not meteorologically here

Yeah that would make more sense.  It's just the meteorological definition uses two arbitrary dates (1st of June to 31st of August) which aren't special in any way.  At least the astronomical definition uses the solstice and equinox as it's start and end points.  For example, the meteorological definition states the 1st of March is the start of spring, however I'd hardly say the start of March is spring-like!  I think a definition based on solar intensity would be cool (however the dates would change every year, like the astronomical ones do).

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6 hours ago, Weather-history said:

 I think the astronomical definition is daft. It surely should be the period where the sun is at highest and strongest, the greatest period of daylight of the year and that is between Beltane (7th May) and Lughnasadh (7th August).  That to me, makes logically sense. After all we are talking astronomically not meteorologically here

completely agree, thats the timing the anglo saxons used and its their words we use for the seasons.... and it explains why 'midsummers day' is june 24th...

its clearly not summer like today, nor is it going to be, and for most of us its not been summer like for a while apart from a few odd days here and there (obvs the favoured southeast might disagree). my 'memories' on facebook reveal that my daily weather blogs over the last several years too also talk of autumnal weather. 

'nice' septembers with sunshine and heat are rarer then one would imagine.

ps... isnt beltane april 30th?..

Edited by mushymanrob
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10 hours ago, Weather-history said:

Officially for me, its over. 

 

Summer ended here a good 3 weeks ago...next five days there is snow in the forecast everyday and temps dont get above 3-5c and are below freezing at night..and its 11th Sept ..whats that all about...must be global warming...:ball-santa-emoji:

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6 hours ago, mushymanrob said:

completely agree, thats the timing the anglo saxons used and its their words we use for the seasons.... and it explains why 'midsummers day' is june 24th...

its clearly not summer like today, nor is it going to be, and for most of us its not been summer like for a while apart from a few odd days here and there (obvs the favoured southeast might disagree). my 'memories' on facebook reveal that my daily weather blogs over the last several years too also talk of autumnal weather. 

'nice' septembers with sunshine and heat are rarer then one would imagine.

ps... isnt beltane april 30th?..

I always assumed that the terms 'midsummer' and 'midwinter' come from the fact that Spring and Autumn, though defined as seasons in their own right were also regarded as the first halves of the main seasons of Summer and Winter (by astronomical terms) respectfully, if that makes sense. In other words a solar year was defined as beginning on the Spring equinox, which marked the beginning of the Summer half of the year, peaking at the Summer solstice, or 'midsummer', then winding down until the Autumnal equinox, which marked the beginning of the Winter half which again has its lowest point at the Winter solstice or 'midwinter' continuing all the way to Spring equinox again when another solar year would begin. At least that's what makes sense to me. 

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On 06/09/2018 at 10:01, Wimbledon88 said:

Same here in London. 

Personally I think it was the never ending monotonous tedium of it that will be memorable. 

2015 never matched the greatness of 2018 for heat or sunshine. The maximum in July 2015 is forgotten, because such a poor and dreary summer followed it.

A long spell of dry and sunny warm weather will always be remembered over a two to three day record breaking temp.

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18 minutes ago, DAVID SNOW said:

Shame its 6 weeks late!

It's never too late for a plume!

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4 minutes ago, Mapantz said:

It's never too late for a plume!

Agreed! Hotter the better! May even get the last of the summer rays before winter sets in 

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36 minutes ago, DAVID SNOW said:

A plume on the way I hear?

Shame its 6 weeks late!

all depends how the low behaves, but plumes do tend to arrive Tue to Wed

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7 hours ago, cheeky_monkey said:

Summer ended here a good 3 weeks ago...next five days there is snow in the forecast everyday and temps dont get above 3-5c and are below freezing at night..and its 11th Sept ..whats that all about...must be global warming...:ball-santa-emoji:

Yellowknife coldest isn't it, gets to -35 maximums Dec/Jan

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13 hours ago, Walsall Wood Snow said:

I always assumed that the terms 'midsummer' and 'midwinter' come from the fact that Spring and Autumn, though defined as seasons in their own right were also regarded as the first halves of the main seasons of Summer and Winter (by astronomical terms) respectfully, if that makes sense. In other words a solar year was defined as beginning on the Spring equinox, which marked the beginning of the Summer half of the year, peaking at the Summer solstice, or 'midsummer', then winding down until the Autumnal equinox, which marked the beginning of the Winter half which again has its lowest point at the Winter solstice or 'midwinter' continuing all the way to Spring equinox again when another solar year would begin. At least that's what makes sense to me. 

its much older then that though, and fits perfectly with the pagan definitions, midsummers day is the mid point between beltane and Lughnasadh  likewise mid winters day .

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1 hour ago, mushymanrob said:

its much older then that though, and fits perfectly with the pagan definitions, midsummers day is the mid point between beltane and Lughnasadh  likewise mid winters day .

Maybe, but the thing that confuses me about that is the fact that Beltane is supposed to be around 1st May. This would define Summer as beginning around the start of May and ending around 1st August. Likewise Winter would begin around 1st November (Samhain) and ending around 1st February (Imbolc).  These definitions would set the seasons as beginning and ending a month earlier than our modern meteorological ones. 

Actually thinking about it, I see where you're coming from if you think of the Summer solstice as occurring around mid June (actually 21st but give or take I suppose) which is roughly half way between 1st May and 1st August. They say every days a School day after all, thanks 👍.

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Summer like heat may return for a time next week all depends on how the ex-hurricane tracks

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1 hour ago, Walsall Wood Snow said:

Maybe, but the thing that confuses me about that is the fact that Beltane is supposed to be around 1st May. This would define Summer as beginning around the start of May and ending around 1st August. Likewise Winter would begin around 1st November (Samhain) and ending around 1st February (Imbolc).  These definitions would set the seasons as beginning and ending a month earlier than our modern meteorological ones. 

Actually thinking about it, I see where you're coming from if you think of the Summer solstice as occurring around mid June (actually 21st but give or take I suppose) which is roughly half way between 1st May and 1st August. They say every days a School day after all, thanks 👍.

i think another factor we need to take into account is the likelyhood that the climate might have been different, warmer in fact. we know it was in roman times. its possible that if it was warmer, plants/nature would be further in advance then what we are used to today.

 

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It does look as though today will be the day that somewhere ( for the sixth month running) touches 80f.

Incredible....

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