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Just now, Fiona Robertson said:

Dublin cam just died.

Earthcam one? Fine here still.

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18 minutes ago, benb said:

39ft swell on one of the bouys S of Eire!!

Think that's the biggest I've ever seen it.

My tired Monday brain initially interpreted this as 'one of the bouys is on fire!!' and I immediately thought blimey, s*** just got real.

 

Considerably quieter in my part of the country but we also have the eerie yellow and the trees are having a bit of a wave.

 

I'm enjoying the photos and reports, keep them coming!

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Just said on sky news of a death after a tree fell on a lady's car.

Also some Muppets going swimming in the sea too. smh

 

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Reports of a 13 year old girl missing in Co Cork. Was dropped off on Cobh ferry and hasn't been seen since. Hopefully she is found safe and well. 

Still relatively calm here in the North. Due to pick up in the coming hours.

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3 minutes ago, Mokidugway said:

Suns out now very hazy,distinct smell of burnt toast in the air ..

Haha sorry my bad im making lunch :rofl:

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7 minutes ago, crimsone said:

This is what a post-nuclear-war climate might look like. I mean, after the soot's cleared. Positively surreal.

Is it orange enough to render Donald Trump invisible?

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My mate in Kinsale says power out all over. Trees down all over. At least 3 days to get power back according to local electricity company.

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Breeze is really picking up in Coventry now. I just saw a weed in the patio move a little. Ruined my calm, that did.

Seriously though - There are people in Ireland who'd kill for this level of calm right now. The contrast is amazing.

 

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Strongest gust so far in Dublin just now. Getting goin now!

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6 minutes ago, Snowstalker said:

Just said on sky news of a death after a tree fell on a lady's car.

Also some Muppets going swimming in the sea too. smh

 

 

Swimming Muppet.png

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2 minutes ago, The Eagle said:

Strongest gust so far in Dublin just now. Getting goin now!

Can see it getting noticably stronger on the Dublin cam.

Have to admit, i'd be uneasy walking down one of those old streets with all of those tiles above.

Edited by Darandio

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picking up a fair bit here now too.

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Posted elsewhere

 

https://twitter.com/rtenews?lang=en

Met Éireann @MetEireann 45m45 minutes ago

Images from our Roches Point weather webcam.
Trees are coming down.
Roches Point has a mean wind speed of 111km/h
Gusts of 156km/h
DMQXQNNW4AETPH0.jpg

DMQXRbIWkAEPBb_.jpg

Edited by The Eagle
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Aperge still going for 75mph gusts here overnight and much of southern Scotland Cumbria and Northumberland

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2 minutes ago, Summer Sun said:

 

Give her a break, that's 5 times she's died...

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Sky in Brum just after midday.

opheliasky1.jpg

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Crazy here , it's lovely out :cc_confused:

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getting very gusty here now, and with a constant roar where the mean wind is obviously high. 

Can't get out to take wind speeds at the moment... work work work 

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Just had a friend post a photo from Eastbourne. Lovely blue skies over there. Quite summery, in fact.

There's a certain amount of cognitive dissonance in trying to picture the weather as a whole across the British Isles at the moment.

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Gusts starting to increase in strength here. Still sunny, blue skies, puffy white clouds (sorry I don't know my clouds) and warm, but looking very hazy toward Bangor and the west. Sea has lots of very small white horses. Potted bay tree starting to wobble, but hasn't blown over just yet.

 

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