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Mark wheeler

World War II

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I love the sound of WWII aeroplanes; always used to run outside and watch them, as they flew to and from Oxford...That was in 1964 BTW!:good:

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1 hour ago, Ed Stone said:

I love the sound of WWII aeroplanes; always used to run outside and watch them, as they flew to and from Oxford...That was in 1964 BTW!:good:

I must admit that those Rolls Royce Merlin engines have a beautiful sound - very reminiscent of my early childhood when the majority of aircraft were still piston engine powered. 

I did have a ride in a piston engine Provost when I was an air cadet at RAF Shawbury during our annual camp a very long time ago - that was fun - I had not long gained my 'B' cert in a Slingsby Cadet MkIII when I had to fly three solos circuits - the operation of the controls in those was very much akin to stirring the Christmas pudding. They (the gliders) had the characteristics of a flying brick but nevertheless they were an excellent initial training aircraft, though inverted flight unadvisable because the wings would drop off. The nearest we could get to aerobatics was stall turns - they were great and got them off to a 'T'.  

Back to the Provost - The pilot asked me if I had done any flying before and being a 16 year old full of myself (You know it all at that age and don't have any fear) said, 'Yes, I have just done my solo in a glider' - 'OK', he says, 'You have control, now make a turn to the left' - I executed the movement in the same manner as which I flew the glider and damn near ended up doing a barrel roll - 'Oops', I say, 'It's a bit sensitive on the controls isn't it' - He agreed and said, 'Now try again' - I did operating the controls very gingerly but did it right that time. 

1 hour ago, Mark wheeler said:

Hopefully they can be back in the air soon , I have a ticket for the Duxford air show in late September so fingers crossed . Good they found the fault before any crash etc .

https://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/17/raf-grounds-second-world-war-era-planes-over-safety-fears

Apparently it is the policy of the RAF that when a fault is found in an engine, the remainder of the aircraft with engines of a similar type are also grounded as a safety precaution, so no doubt they will be checking the whole fleet, just in case. They are getting scarce and we can't afford to lose any of them, or the pilots trained to fly them, who apparently have to be top notch.  

It is great however that they till keep these old ladies airworthy after more than 70 years - they are national treasures. 

Edited by mike Meehan

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I was reading somewhere that the Hurricane was the unsung hero of the Battle of Britain , with the Spit getting mostly remembered .  Germany had some really good fighters such as the ME109 with it;s fuel injection system and 20 mm cannon firing through the air screw. The FW 190 was a very good fighter bomber as well. 

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In many ways the Hurricane won the battle,wasn't till the later spitfires that they really over took it as the main RAF fighter. It was a more stable platform for firing,pilots loved that feature of the hurricane.. The ME 109 was good,and with the fuel injection could do a inverted roll that neither RAF  plane could due to having carbs.

Edited by markyo

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I thought I'd share a video that I often watch on YouTube , I was there on both days to watch this brilliant air show and was taken aback by all those at the show be it the venue planes or the brilliant people, the veterans especially candidly speaking about there experiences with the spectators and also the people who were in fancy dress , there was Churchill , Goering and even a Neville chamberlain to name but a few some planted for theme other not  . Also I counted countless men and women in tears as they watched the show especially as the spitfires and hurricanes graced the airwayes my dad being one of those that in turn made me emotional and the scramble for the 2 109s was brilliant , ( Hispano Bouchons I know ) 

 

Edited by Mark wheeler

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8 hours ago, Mark wheeler said:

I thought this may interest some and looking back there does not seem to be a thread on WWII.

Truly a marvellous find .

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/world-us-canada-40991326

The Indianapolis fate became better known to the general public with this famous scene from Jaws

 

Edited by Weather-history

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I don't think that there's much doubt that the delivery of those 2 bombs saved a lot of allied servicemen s lives,especially POW's .  an attack on the Japanese   mainland  would have cost between 400-800 000 casualties.

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3 minutes ago, Mokidugway said:

I've been to ground zero in Hiroshima, you wouldn't think that if you go..

I have to disagree...

I too have been  and it was on a day of remembrance with many Japanese people  (including kids), holding ceremonies..

The overriding theme was that Hiroshima had saved many lives by ending the war early..

I was amazed by there fortitude. They were happy to talk and held no malice towards me or our party, despite  my expressing  my feelings of deep sorrow for them. They were extremely philosophical about it all.

I must say I left feeling very empty...

 

MIA

 

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11 minutes ago, Mokidugway said:

I've been to ground zero in Hiroshima, you wouldn't think that if you go..

At the time it  was a stark choice between  dropping the bombs and ending Japanese resistance,or  incurring horrendous casualties in an attack on the Japanese mainland.

The Japanese had already demonstrated during the fighting on Saipan,Okinawa, and Guadal Canal that they would die rather than surrender . There were around 32,000 allied p.ow's on the Japanese mainland  at the time , who would have certainly been executed. ,along with prisoners in Thailand, etc.

At the time, the saving of allied servicemens  lives  (my own grandfather being one) was quite rightly given priority.

 

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14 minutes ago, Midlands Ice Age said:

I have to disagree...

I too have been  and it was on a day of remembrance with many Japanese people  (including kids), holding ceremonies..

The overriding theme was that Hiroshima had saved many lives by ending the war early..

I was amazed by there fortitude. They were happy to talk and held no malice towards me or our party, despite  my expressing  my feelings of deep sorrow for them. They were extremely philosophical about it all.

I must say I left feeling very empty...

 

MIA

 

I too felt profoundly moved , hopefully it will never be repeated ,though I disagree with their use to to bring an end to the Pacific war .

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8 hours ago, 78/79 said:

I was reading somewhere that the Hurricane was the unsung hero of the Battle of Britain , with the Spit getting mostly remembered .  Germany had some really good fighters such as the ME109 with it;s fuel injection system and 20 mm cannon firing through the air screw. The FW 190 was a very good fighter bomber as well. 

 

 

8 hours ago, 78/79 said:

I was reading somewhere that the Hurricane was the unsung hero of the Battle of Britain , with the Spit getting mostly remembered .  Germany had some really good fighters such as the ME109 with it;s fuel injection system and 20 mm cannon firing through the air screw. The FW 190 was a very good fighter bomber as well. 

Indeed , I was always told by my grandparents that they feared the FW 190s more than any other German aircraft. I was told they could see the obvious enhancement they gave although rarely seen over London and only in counter raids to the bombing in Germany in late 1942 . It was also a brilliant night fighter by all accounts .

Ps, sorry for double quote I can't get rid .

 

Edited by Mark wheeler

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The ME 110 , although outclassed during the battle , really came into it's own as a Night Fighter  later on in the war, as did the Junkers 88 , especially when fitted with Schrage Musik  upwards firing 20 mm cannon and Lichenstein intercept radar.

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I'm so glad this thread exists.

It will prevent every other thread sporadically descending into a 'who knows more useless facts about the war' discussion!

Loved the 'Jaws' clip btw. Three of the best actors of that era on a small boat together with a great script. Superb stuff!

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On Sunday, August 20, 2017 at 22:46, 78/79 said:

At the time it  was a stark choice between  dropping the bombs and ending Japanese resistance,or  incurring horrendous casualties in an attack on the Japanese mainland.

The Japanese had already demonstrated during the fighting on Saipan,Okinawa, and Guadal Canal that they would die rather than surrender . There were around 32,000 allied p.ow's on the Japanese mainland  at the time , who would have certainly been executed. ,along with prisoners in Thailand, etc.

At the time, the saving of allied servicemens  lives  (my own grandfather being one) was quite rightly given priority.

 

You are spot on, the Japanese had vowed to fight until the last man standing, and they had shown that as they way in the battles for the Pacific Islands. A far more questionable tactic was that of bomber Harris, and his decision to carpet bomb, German cities to simply demoralise the civilian population. Raids which killed far more in one night then died in the entire blitz on London. 

I live just a few miles from Biggin Hill so get the airshows for free, and Biggles is up most days in his Spirit of Kent spit  if not the 2 seater trainer is giving passengers a go at 2k a time :) the camouflage is still on the brickwork of my cottage...

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8 hours ago, HighPressure said:

You are spot on, the Japanese had vowed to fight until the last man standing, and they had shown that as they way in the battles for the Pacific Islands. A far more questionable tactic was that of bomber Harris, and his decision to carpet bomb, German cities to simply demoralise the civilian population. Raids which killed far more in one night then died in the entire blitz on London. 

I live just a few miles from Biggin Hill so get the airshows for free, and Biggles is up most days in his Spirit of Kent spit  if not the 2 seater trainer is giving passengers a go at 2k a time :) the camouflage is still on the brickwork of my cottage...

Tend to agree with you re the German cities,  especially Dresden in Feb 45, I honestly don't think that  it's objective to break German morale  actually worked. It had some success in disrupting war production , but very often the factories would be back in production within weeks or even days.

 

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43 minutes ago, 78/79 said:

Tend to agree with you re the German cities,  especially Dresden in Feb 45, I honestly don't think that  it's objective to break German morale  actually worked. It had some success in disrupting war production , but very often the factories would be back in production within weeks or even days.

 

I've read a few books on the bombing of German cities as I'm sure you have too . I found this one to be one of the best . If you or anybody else have any recommendations etc on any aspect of WW2 It would be great to hear from you . 

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/218932629

Also I have for years had a desire to travel to France etc to go on tours  of the Normandy beaches and more but they seem quite expensive any suggestions?.

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Who's heard of Hans-Ulrich Rudel? Flew Stukas in ww2. Take a look at his record, 519 tanks,one battleship,one cruiser,one destroyer and 70 landing craft and that doesn't include toe 800 other vehicles,4 armoured trains and 150 big artillery guns.!! As much as we all hated the Nazis and he was one it can't be denied he was the most effective airman in history.

Edited by markyo

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4 hours ago, markyo said:

Who's heard of Hans-Ulrich Rudel? Flew Stukas in ww2. Take a look at his record, 519 tanks,one battleship,one cruiser,one destroyer and 70 landing craft and that doesn't include toe 800 other vehicles,4 armoured trains and 150 big artillery guns.!! As much as we all hated the Nazis and he was one it can't be denied he was the most effective airman in history.

I have, he won the Knights Cross with Oak leaves , swards , and Diamonds  , he was an unrepentant Nazi , but a very brave man nonetheless. . Erich Hartmann  was the most successful pilot  in the history of aerial warfare , shooting down  352 allied aircraft ,347 soviet , and 7 american.He was nicknamed Bubi (the kid) by his comrades , and the Black devil by the Soviets. He too was awarded Germanys highest award .  along with Rudel. After  release  in 1955  from POW camp by the Soviets following trumped  up charges of war crimes , he went on to serve in the Bundeswehr  retiring in 1970

A black and white photograph of a smiling young man wearing a military uniform, peaked cap, various military decorations including a neck order in shape of an Iron Cross.

Edited by 78/79

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29 minutes ago, 78/79 said:

I have, he won the Knights Cross with Oak leaves , swards , and Diamonds  , he was an unrepentant Nazi , but a very brave man nonetheless. . Erich Hartmann  was the most successful pilot  in the history of aerial warfare , shooting down  352 allied aircraft ,347 soviet , and 7 american.He was nicknamed Bubi (the kid) by his comrades , and the Black devil by the Soviets. He too was awarded Germanys highest award .  along with Rudel. After  release  in 1955  from POW camp by the Soviets following trumped  up charges of war crimes , he went on to serve in the Bundeswehr  retiring in 1970

A black and white photograph of a smiling young man wearing a military uniform, peaked cap, various military decorations including a neck order in shape of an Iron Cross.

Yep by far was the best fighter pilot of all time,some say his figures are distorted by lack of quality of the Russian pilots and aircraft,i disagree,many marks of Soviet fighters were a match for the 109E and the 190,their pilots made up for lack of training with sheer courage. He was i understand not to be a committed Nazi,when ordered to fly with his wing man to the British lines to surrender to avoid the Russians he disobeyed and stayed with his men to fall into Soviet capture.. One other thing about Rudel,6 weeks after loosing a lower leg he was back on active service. Nazi he may have been,no respect for that all but for his sheer will and commitment you have to acknowledge his place in the war,if only down to the sheer volume of both men and material he destroyed.

Edited by markyo

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15 hours ago, Mark wheeler said:

I came across this sight that I found intresting , with its accounts and information.

 

http://bombsight.org/explore/greater-london/

What a fascinating site,behind every red dot there would have been many stories without doubt,brings war in to scale.

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