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Carl46Wrexham

If you could travel back in time to relive a memorable weather event

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Which would you choose?

I would have to go for the severe thunderstorms event of July 1st/2nd 1968.

By all written accounts (was only 3 at the time so don't really remember anything of the event) an area of the UK stretching in a line from Devon up to Merseyside along the England/Wales border experienced almost continuous thunder and lightning for 24 hours!!! Hailstones measuring 7x6cm recorded at Cardiff Airport. Daytime darkness and widespread red rain from Saharan dust. Cloud tops recorded as being in excess of 42,000 feet. 

Would be quite an experience to relive this event.

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Night of 4th/5th January 2010 and lamp post watch this time!

Went to bed knowing there was a covering and snow showers coming through but didn't expect the amount that fell when I awoke next morning.

 

 

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1684 would be my option.

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Summer of 76 for me, week after week of sun and heat or the winter of 78/79, week after week of snow and cold.

I've clear memories of both and in both cases have seen nothing like it since.

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Winter of 47!! (Can just remember the snow over our 6 foot hedge and being cut off for 2 weeks ).

Main course

an option of the winter of 62/63...  or the summer of 76.

I would find it difficult to choose.

MIA

 

Edited by Midlands Ice Age
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one event when I was a bairn, remember a dumping of snow, either Dec '90 or Feb '91, could have been that, what got me into weather

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December 2010. That is one winter month and year I will never forget. 

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Has to be December 2010. Easily the deepest snow I've seen and probably the longest it's stayed on the ground before melting. A winter that you could actually call winter.

Edited by matt111

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Would love to travel back in time to a truly epic drizzle event ,it would be .........sooo boring .:closedeyes:

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9 minutes ago, Mokidugway said:

Would love to travel back in time to a truly epic drizzle event ,it would be .........sooo boring .:closedeyes:

I wouldn't have to go back far for that.. 2 whole days. :rofl:

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Most of my most memorable weather events I most certainly would not want to relive.  One would be struggling to fill a weather balloon in a F 11 at the after end of a ship with 40-60 foot sea running when the cold front suddenly passed through initiating a massive change in wind direction. A change of underwear became an immediate necessity.

Edited by knocker
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Were do I start on this? :laugh:
So many to choose from and that I'd like to re-experience :pardon:

I'll start with the epic thunderstorm on the 1st July 2015, after such a hot and humid day I'd just about thrown the towel in (storm wise) and then the 'beast broke out at about 22.10, and what a storm it was!! :yahoo:... We had several other storms that week as well :D
There are many other good storms that I'd like to revisit, but I can't remember the dates off the top of my head, but I'm going back to the 1980s, 90s, and early 2000s.

The next would be the fine sunny day of the 27th February 2013... After another long run of dull grey skies with nothingness, the sun finally appeared, but there was a beautiful, hazy, golden smokey appearance to the air that day... T'was just beautiful :D

There are also several big windstorms, from Storm Doris earlier this year, to the storm of October 27th 2002, and the infamous Hebridean Hurricane of January 2005... My mind goes a bit foggy after that. :pardon:

Talking of fog, I also enjoy a good misty, foggy autumnal morning/day... Sooooooo atmospheric, we used to get some really good fogs around here in the 70s, 80s and early 90s. :smile:

For cold and snow, I'd have to go back to the overnight snow event of the 19th-20th December 2009... Very cold, a reasonable covering of snow, and a beautifully clear and sunny day, with heavy snow shower... Perfect winters day for me :good:

No doubt I'll add more as the mists of time clear through my foggy mind. :laugh:

By the way, top marks to @Carl46Wrexham for this threat :good:

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By the way I meant to say thread, not threat... Sorry about that @Carl46Wrexham, only I suffer with dyslexic fingers, end the edit button has disappeared. :blink2:

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A lot to choose from but near the top of my list would be February 16th 1962 to re-live the tremendous gale which caused huge amounts of damage in Sheffield. I can remember it well enough but would love to be there with an anemometer.

 

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2 minutes ago, Terminal Moraine said:

A lot to choose from but near the top of my list would be February 16th 1962 to re-live the tremendous gale which caused huge amounts of damage in Sheffield. I can remember it well enough but would love to be there with an anemometer.

 

Katabatic windstorm i believe ,huge amounts of damage done to over a third of the cities housing stock ,:shok:

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I would go back to the winter of 1990-91 when heavy wet snow brought down power lines accross the East Midlands.Here just north of Derby we had no power for 2 weeks even though the lying snow only lasted for a week at best.I remember looking out of the window and seeing blue electrical flashes lighting up the night sky.I was only 9 at the time and it was a quite a scary night to remember.

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Going back to my original post....just think about it a moment....near continuous thunder and lightning for 24 hours, Crazy. It amazes me how difficult information on this particular event is to find online given the severity and long lasting nature of the said event.

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On ‎01‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 09:46, Eye to the sky said:

I would go back to the winter of 1990-91 when heavy wet snow brought down power lines accross the East Midlands.Here just north of Derby we had no power for 2 weeks even though the lying snow only lasted for a week at best.I remember looking out of the window and seeing blue electrical flashes lighting up the night sky.I was only 9 at the time and it was a quite a scary night to remember.

ETTS

Yep, a good choice for here too.

We had 18 hours of snow depositing 16 inches of snow, also with the blue lightening effects of power lines crashing down, with the very heavy wet snow..

Locally we had the M6 blocked for 36 hours at Canley and complete traffic chaos.

A night to remember.

MIA

Edited by Midlands Ice Age

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1 hour ago, Midlands Ice Age said:

ETTS

Yep, a good choice for here too.

We had 18 hours of snow depositing 16 inches of snow, also with the blue lightening effects of power lines crashing down, with the very heavy wet snow..

Locally we had the M6 blocked for 36 hours at Canley and complete traffic chaos.

A night to remember.

MIA

Think the M1 was shut for a few hours too.Just north of Nottingham.

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The storms of July 3rd/4th 2001 would have to be a serious contender as well. Thundery trough drifted eastwards into hot and humid air resulting in spectacular lightning in the west of the UK with strike rates recorded in excess of 80 per minute. There is a satellite photo of the UK from John Mason's site showing the big cells in the west of the UK with associated clearly visible anvil shadows.

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Outside my (relatively short) lifetime, I'd go for January 1795 (the coldest monthly CET ever, a ludicrous -3.1C), February 1947 because of the exceptionally deep snows, and of course the absurdly cold October 1740 (CET of 5.3C!). Then, even though I'm much more of a cold fan, I couldn't say no to May 1833 and June 1846, for their totally unmatched heat (CET values of 15.1C and 18.2C).

For wind, then we have the Great Storm of 1987, and the Great Storm of 1703, which it's thought may have been category 2 if it was a hurricane!

When it comes to thunderstorms I'm not really sure, I'm not too aware of historic thunderstorms.

If I was to go back to a particular decade, it would be a toss-up between the 1790s and the 1940s. The former saw some incredible swings in winter extremes from year to year, and unusually that decade saw four Aprils with CETs of 10C or above (another at 9.6C), and a lot of chilly Marches too. The latter (mostly from 1945 onwards) saw an unusual number of heat records broken (mostly in Spring and Summer). These include the warmest July day ever for central England (CET of 25.2C in late July 1948), and the warmest June day ever (CET of 23.0C on the 3rd, made even more remarkable by the fact that June is a warming month). And then of course there is 1947, with the coldest February ever, followed by, what was at the time the hottest August ever.

In my lifetime, I'd revisit December 2010 for obvious reasons, February 2012 for the extremely dry, cold Siberian air that we experienced in the first half of the month, March 2013 for the extremely cold, snow-covered days after the equinox (icicles galore), and July 2014 for night after night of thunderstorms.

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12 hours ago, Carl46Wrexham said:

Going back to my original post....just think about it a moment....near continuous thunder and lightning for 24 hours, Crazy. It amazes me how difficult information on this particular event is to find online given the severity and long lasting nature of the said event.

I think my teacher mentioned this event once at school. It was the morning after a massive overnight storm in September 1995 which left flooding everywhere, and he was telling everyone it wasn't as bad as 1967 (he may have got the year wrong).

As an aside he was probably my favourite ever teacher. A real larger than life character. All the kids without exception loved him. One former pupil even wrote a eulogy on his local history website after his passing in 2013 (http://historic-liverpool.co.uk/mr-john-dewsnap-and-the-teaching-of-history/).

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It's an easy pick for me... July 25 1986: The last time measurable snow lay on the ground in Hobart city at the waterfront ( 6-8cm ). The closest we have got since then was a patchy dusting on susceptible surfaces in August 2015...not comparable in the slightest. The previous settled fall before 1986 was in 1951 and 1921 - so it's an incredibly rare event ( seems to have happened numerous times in the 19th century though ).

595dca5ee4f6a_snowhobart.thumb.jpg.80b0cc8406c426af438837ac1403ca59.jpg

hobartsnow.jpg

Edited by Styx
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