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Ridge and inversion - what is the difference?


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I understand that a ridge is an upper high (occuring below the tropopause) that is associated with warm air advection. However I was trying to figure out the difference between a ridge and an inversion. I'm guessing a ridge is assiciated with the horizontal axis, and an inversion to do with warmer air rising vertically from the surface? Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks

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Inversions are where a layer of colder air lies close to the surface below warmer air above, without signifcant mixing of the airmasses.  It sometimes occurs in the vicinity of a weak warm front as warmer air moves in over the colder air lower in the atmosphere, and, thanks to the cooler temperatures being close to the dewpoint, the lower air mass is sometimes misty or foggy.

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On 22/12/2016 at 11:45, November2005Fan said:

I understand that a ridge is an upper high (occuring below the tropopause) that is associated with warm air advection. However I was trying to figure out the difference between a ridge and an inversion. I'm guessing a ridge is assiciated with the horizontal axis, and an inversion to do with warmer air rising vertically from the surface? Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks

The inversion is simply the temperature profile that you often find in anticyclonic conditions. Air subsiding from higher levels in the atmosphere will compress due to greater air pressure, and this in turn will warm the descending air. It's this subsidence and warming with height that can produce anticyclonic gloom by "trapping" cloud at lower levels.

Edited by Nick L
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For some reason this reminds me of a promotion board many years ago. The Chief Forecaster, Ewen McCallum, asked me to name all the different types of inversions that occur and the reasons behind them . Could have been worse.:)

Edited by knocker
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On 25/12/2016 at 07:40, knocker said:

For some reason this reminds me of a promotion board many years ago. The Chief Forecaster, Ewen McCallum, asked me to name all the different types of inversions that occur and the reasons behind them . Could have been worse.:)

How many types are there, Malcolm?

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17 minutes ago, chrisbell-nottheweatherman said:

How many types are there, Malcolm?

Now don't start Chris. :) Oh here you go  :shok:

 Temperature Inversion – Types – Effects on Weather

https://www.pmfias.com/temperature-inversion-types-economic-implications-temperature-inversion/

 

Edited by knocker
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