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Hello,

Thought i would share my recent experiences with anxiety and panic attacks which has become a real issue affecting my life on a weekly basis now :(

This suddenly appeared in my life last november out of the blue while away for the weekend in edinburgh for a xmas shopping break away with my partner... i had a very sudden yet servere panic attack which resulted in the paramedics attending to me at the hotel. Ever since then i have suffered from panic attacks and feeling very anxious in many situations and avoiding many things that i enjoy and did without any thought what so ever prior to this. 

So after 33 years of my life free of these panic attacks and feelings of anxiety i have lived the past year of my life in constant battle with this horrible mental health issue.

I have recieved CBT therapy earlier in the year which helped me a great deal understand my thoughts and symptoms, therefor reducing my panic attacks.

Reason for mentioning this and talking openly is that i have discovered that many people i know also suffer some form of anxiety or panic to some degree and it is alot more common than i thought and as a sufferer know how difficult this can be and would like to share my thoughts, experience and knowledge to help others and recieve help from people who also suffer in silence sometimes.

All coments/help welcome if anyone has any experience with this

Kind regards 

 

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http://www.selfhelpguides.ntw.nhs.uk/somerset/ I work for the NHS in Somerset. I'm a counsellor here and work alongside some great CBT therapists who treat anxiety. I've added a link above to our

It's sad to read of so many suffering some form of panic/stress problems and i wish there was a magic wand that could wave it all away. From personal experience i can certainly recommend exercise

Hello, Thought i would share my recent experiences with anxiety and panic attacks which has become a real issue affecting my life on a weekly basis now This suddenly appeared in my life last

24 minutes ago, lassie23 said:

I always thought something bad triggered panic attacks off, either recent or from your childhood.

things from a past experience can trigger a panic attack your right or anxious feelings like a phobia or negative image/thing from years ago.

However mine was probably due to some big life changing things in the months prior to my first panic attack

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55 minutes ago, doctor32 said:

Hello,

Thought i would share my recent experiences with anxiety and panic attacks which has become a real issue affecting my life on a weekly basis now :(

This suddenly appeared in my life last november out of the blue while away for the weekend in edinburgh for a xmas shopping break away with my partner... i had a very sudden yet servere panic attack which resulted in the paramedics attending to me at the hotel. Ever since then i have suffered from panic attacks and feeling very anxious in many situations and avoiding many things that i enjoy and did without any thought what so ever prior to this. 

So after 33 years of my life free of these panic attacks and feelings of anxiety i have lived the past year of my life in constant battle with this horrible mental health issue.

I have recieved CBT therapy earlier in the year which helped me a great deal understand my thoughts and symptoms, therefor reducing my panic attacks.

Reason for mentioning this and talking openly is that i have discovered that many people i know also suffer some form of anxiety or panic to some degree and it is alot more common than i thought and as a sufferer know how difficult this can be and would like to share my thoughts, experience and knowledge to help others and recieve help from people who also suffer in silence sometimes.

All coments/help welcome if anyone has any experience with this

Kind regards 

 

I wish you all the best with this, it's horrible to experience. I'm lucky that my anxiety has subsided dramatically recently but I know it can come back quickly.

Talking about it helps immensely, as you say loads and loads of folk suffer from this type of thing. You're not alone, at least that's what the voices in my head keep telling me. It's not everyone's cup of tea but I find humour helps a lot :) 

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21 minutes ago, CatchMyDrift said:

I wish you all the best with this, it's horrible to experience. I'm lucky that my anxiety has subsided dramatically recently but I know it can come back quickly.

Talking about it helps immensely, as you say loads and loads of folk suffer from this type of thing. You're not alone, at least that's what the voices in my head keep telling me. It's not everyone's cup of tea but I find humour helps a lot :) 

Thanks for your response, can i ask what has helped your anxiety levels to drop apart from humour... not sure that will help me at the moment.

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3 hours ago, lassie23 said:

I always thought something bad triggered panic attacks off, either recent or from your childhood.

Panic attacks are caused by something being triggered, you just don't always know what.

That's why therapy is really useful because it helps you get to the why and then deal with the attacks.

 

Glad to hear you are doing better, OP.

 

It's super common and loads of people get it. The things to rememeber are:

 

- It's a natural reaction to a threat. Your body is made to do this. You're not dying, you will come out of it.

- It is only temporary, it doesn't last.

- Seek out support to combat it.

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9 minutes ago, Lauren said:

Panic attacks are caused by something being triggered, you just don't always know what.

That's why therapy is really useful because it helps you get to the why and then deal with the attacks.

 

Glad to hear you are doing better, OP.

What's the best therapy?

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I have only tried CBT Therapy, going back to see what else is available next week.

Exercise is suppose to be good to relieve symptoms, produceses happy chemicals in the brain.

CBT therapy good at making you think in a more positive and realistic way instead of catastrophic thinking.

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20 minutes ago, lassie23 said:

What's the best therapy?

CBT to deal with the attacks. General counselling or psychotherapy to understand why.

12 minutes ago, doctor32 said:

I have only tried CBT Therapy, going back to see what else is available next week.

Exercise is suppose to be good to relieve symptoms, produceses happy chemicals in the brain.

CBT therapy good at making you think in a more positive and realistic way instead of catastrophic thinking.

 

The NHS is really a postcode lottery as to what is available, but if you can afford private, I'd suggest some psychotherapy.

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I'm in debate with myself as to whether I'm suffering from some form of anxiety. On some occasions I have to really psych myself up just to go to the shop or even go to the shared kitchen if housemates are in there, and when I do so I am constantly on edge and sweating, as if I'm being watched/judged. It's not at all pleasant, but is it anxiety?

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15 minutes ago, Nick L said:

I'm in debate with myself as to whether I'm suffering from some form of anxiety. On some occasions I have to really psych myself up just to go to the shop or even go to the shared kitchen if housemates are in there, and when I do so I am constantly on edge and sweating, as if I'm being watched/judged. It's not at all pleasant, but is it anxiety?

Do your housemates intimidate you?

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13 minutes ago, Nick L said:

I'm in debate with myself as to whether I'm suffering from some form of anxiety. On some occasions I have to really psych myself up just to go to the shop or even go to the shared kitchen if housemates are in there, and when I do so I am constantly on edge and sweating, as if I'm being watched/judged. It's not at all pleasant, but is it anxiety?

Sounds like it is anxiety, it effects everyone different of course and some people are more sensitive to the feelings of anxiety which makes a big difference to the symptoms you get.

 

Sweaty hands, feet etc are common along with increased heart rate and change in breathing. You may feel like your being watched and in turn makes you more aware of your symptoms/feelings which makes you more panicky/anxious. 

Of course it could just be your a little nervous with certain situations which in turn makes you more anxious

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4 hours ago, doctor32 said:

Thanks for your response, can i ask what has helped your anxiety levels to drop apart from humour... not sure that will help me at the moment.

I was thinking about this when I was out walking the dog and realised that stopping smoking is the only major change I've had in the past few months. I know that's counter intuitive, although lowered blood pressure is no doubt a good thing. The blunt truth is that if you suffer from anxiety you must not use drugs or alcohol and probably shouldn't smoke either. 

Beyond that you have to find what works for you. Perhaps some form of medication would help (I found Propranolol were fabby for a time, but only for a time when I was very unwell). Perhaps a change in lifestyle would help; I find long walks with the dog help me a lot (I've been out for three hours this afternoon while MrsC is at work). Perhaps professional therapy would help, CBT is very effective for some people and full scale psychoanalysis works well for others. Talking about it is a massive help because it normalises what can be a scary and lonely experience.

Also, learn to believe in your mental illness as a good and proper real old fashioned illness like heart disease or diabetes. This seems like a daft thing to say but if you don't treat your illness as a proper illness then who else will? Having a full scale panic attack can be very serious if you start hyperventilating and get to the point you can't breathe, or get so worked up that you have a heart attack. 

Learn to feel the warning signs long before the panic starts. Don't force yourself to try and cope with something which you won't be able to cope with. If you had heart disease would you try to run a marathon? So why when you suffer from anxiety are you trying to do things which cause you extreme anxiety? Only do what you can manage that day, although that doesn't mean you should hide in your house all day. 

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27 minutes ago, Nick L said:

I'm in debate with myself as to whether I'm suffering from some form of anxiety. On some occasions I have to really psych myself up just to go to the shop or even go to the shared kitchen if housemates are in there, and when I do so I am constantly on edge and sweating, as if I'm being watched/judged. It's not at all pleasant, but is it anxiety?

Yes it is...sorry.

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20 minutes ago, lassie23 said:

Do your housemates intimidate you?

Not at all. They generally keep themselves to themselves and are friendly! That's what makes it so bizarre.

18 minutes ago, doctor32 said:

Sounds like it is anxiety, it effects everyone different of course and some people are more sensitive to the feelings of anxiety which makes a big difference to the symptoms you get.

 

Sweaty hands, feet etc are common along with increased heart rate and change in breathing. You may feel like your being watched and in turn makes you more aware of your symptoms/feelings which makes you more panicky/anxious. 

Of course it could just be your a little nervous with certain situations which in turn makes you more anxious

I think you're probably right. It's not something that impacts my life too much so I've never given it a great deal of thought, but it's certainly something that has only really popped up in recent years. Initially I put it down to low confidence/shyness, but seems to be more than that.

It's very selective, however. Going on social outings I'm generally fine, even around new people.

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3 minutes ago, CatchMyDrift said:

I was thinking about this when I was out walking the dog and realised that stopping smoking is the only major change I've had in the past few months. I know that's counter intuitive, although lowered blood pressure is no doubt a good thing. The blunt truth is that if you suffer from anxiety you must not use drugs or alcohol and probably shouldn't smoke either. 

Beyond that you have to find what works for you. Perhaps some form of medication would help (I found Propranolol were fabby for a time, but only for a time when I was very unwell). Perhaps a change in lifestyle would help; I find long walks with the dog help me a lot (I've been out for three hours this afternoon while MrsC is at work). Perhaps professional therapy would help, CBT is very effective for some people and full scale psychoanalysis works well for others. Talking about it is a massive help because it normalises what can be a scary and lonely experience.

Also, learn to believe in your mental illness as a good and proper real old fashioned illness like heart disease or diabetes. This seems like a daft thing to say but if you don't treat your illness as a proper illness then who else will? Having a full scale panic attack can be very serious if you start hyperventilating and get to the point you can't breathe, or get so worked up that you have a heart attack. 

Learn to feel the warning signs long before the panic starts. Don't force yourself to try and cope with something which you won't be able to cope with. If you had heart disease would you try to run a marathon? So why when you suffer from anxiety are you trying to do things which cause you extreme anxiety? Only do what you can manage that day, although that doesn't mean you should hide in your house all day. 

Hi, thanks for your comment. 

Well i dont drink or do drugs or smoke and cut my caffine intake right down to one cup a day. I'm currently trying to gain weight as i lost alot in the aftermath of my severe panic attacks. So currently eating a wide range of food/deit and with me being slightly underweight i have slightly low blood pressure which makes me feel quite dizzy/light headed sometimes so that in turn makes me anxious and panic when im out and about.

I have been intouch with GP regular and seeing a dietitian. Seeing a private therapist next week. Also tried hypnosis once.

Dont think medication is for me, never take tablets for anything... bit of a phobia which aint a good thing

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Oh crikey, I have missed a lot over the last while!

I'm an anxiety/panic attack person too. Anyone who wants to can talk by personal message.

My "cure" has been exercise! Feeling good about myself, using up all that excess adrenaline and eating healthily.

Start by banning the stimulants like caffeine. I allow myself one normal coffee in the morning and then have decaf or herbal tea. Ahem. alcohol in excess is an issue as it reduces your anxiety in the moment, but the biochemistry makes for anxiety with a hangover! So a glass or two of wine/your favourite tipple and then as much  water as the alcohol you have consumed before bed. Caffeine, flavour enhancers like MSG etc. make you more prone to panic attacks because of how they affect your heart rhythm - and we know all that stuff!

If I have a crisis, my doctor here in France gives me a mild benzodiazapine but only very short term.

Need to go - gardening to do :) work starts next week!

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2 minutes ago, Spikecollie said:

Oh crikey, I have missed a lot over the last while!

I'm an anxiety/panic attack person too. Anyone who wants to can talk by personal message.

My "cure" has been exercise! Feeling good about myself, using up all that excess adrenaline and eating healthily.

Start by banning the stimulants like caffeine. I allow myself one normal coffee in the morning and then have decaf or herbal tea. Ahem. alcohol in excess is an issue as it reduces your anxiety in the moment, but the biochemistry makes for anxiety with a hangover! So a glass or two of wine/your favourite tipple and then as much  water as the alcohol you have consumed before bed. Caffeine, flavour enhancers like MSG etc. make you more prone to panic attacks because of how they affect your heart rhythm - and we know all that stuff!

If I have a crisis, my doctor here in France gives me a mild benzodiazapine but only very short term.

Need to go - gardening to do :) work starts next week!

Only just found this thread  i myself suffer with anxiety and panic attacks( theirs alot of us)  ive suffered for 17 years after a close family death. medication for me as certainly helped, fluoxatine i take this daily but is certainly doesnt alleviate the systems  it just helps.  I agree alcohol helps in the short term but the day after i can be shaking like a leaf.  Exercise is certainly the way to go  also having a close family member or friend you can talk to also helps alot.  

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It's a modern disorder because of our lifestyles. We are trying to do too much. I'm off to sow my herb seeds and chill in the garden after a stressful day of seeing OH off at the airport (ouch ouch ouch)

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I just thought I would pop-out of lurk mode to mention that anyone who has anxiety issues, really should read up on the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system and heart rate variability (HRV - how regularly your heart beats not how fast). In a nutshell, these are the autonomous systems that control our nervous system - the parasympathetic system calms us and the sympathetic system mobilises us into "fight or flight" mode. Controlling breathing and heart rate  can help to swing your nervous system back to parasympathetic mode. This is probably one of the reasons why exercise (strengthening our hearts) and deep breathing are so helpful in calming us. There are heart rate monitors (I use a Polar H7) and apps that can detect and track HRV, which can be useful to help "re-train" your autonomous nervous system to stop over-reacting so much. I found this out by accident when I was messing with a heart monitor for exercise purposes and found it really helpful  - along with healthy eating, exercise and positive thinking/CBT of course.

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I experienced a really bad bout of anxiety around this time last year, brought on by worrying there was something wrong with my daughter (and googling symtoms on the internet - I've learned my lesson there!)

Initially, I was able to have some form of perspective on the situation, but then it got to the point where I couldn't get it out of my head and was affecting my every thought.  If I actually made it out the front door to go to work, I would be crying on the train to work, crying at work and just felt shaky and panicky all the time.  Nothing anyone could say would convince me that everything would turn out right in the end.  It even brought my OCD out in spectacular style!

I went to the doctors to explain the situation about my daughter and even there, the nurse practitioner was convinced nothing was wrong with her and actually seemed more concerned about my state of mind.  She prescribed me Sertraline and put me in touch with MIND and I must say, the combination of both Sertraline and the therapy MIND had to offer made me strong enough to have my daughter referred for a scan at our hospital.  I'm pleased to say the scan showed everything was normal.

I now look back and cannot believe how I blew things totally out of proportion the way I did, but it just goes to show just how complex the mind and brain is and it is sad that funding in the NHS for mental health services is so poor. 

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I've found a great doctor here in France, who is able to give me half an hour + as opposed to ten minutes! I went to see him in a crisis first and got benzodiazapines to cope for a a short while and when I need them. I get time to talk. His focus on exercise has worked for me - my resting heart rate is now 60! My blood pressure is 110/60 and I am feeling great. The main thing is that he has let me make regular appointments to keep up.

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On 4 September 2016 at 17:46, doctor32 said:

Hello,

Thought i would share my recent experiences with anxiety and panic attacks which has become a real issue affecting my life on a weekly basis now :(

This suddenly appeared in my life last november out of the blue while away for the weekend in edinburgh for a xmas shopping break away with my partner... i had a very sudden yet servere panic attack which resulted in the paramedics attending to me at the hotel. Ever since then i have suffered from panic attacks and feeling very anxious in many situations and avoiding many things that i enjoy and did without any thought what so ever prior to this. 

So after 33 years of my life free of these panic attacks and feelings of anxiety i have lived the past year of my life in constant battle with this horrible mental health issue.

I have recieved CBT therapy earlier in the year which helped me a great deal understand my thoughts and symptoms, therefor reducing my panic attacks.

Reason for mentioning this and talking openly is that i have discovered that many people i know also suffer some form of anxiety or panic to some degree and it is alot more common than i thought and as a sufferer know how difficult this can be and would like to share my thoughts, experience and knowledge to help others and recieve help from people who also suffer in silence sometimes.

All coments/help welcome if anyone has any experience with this

Kind regards 

 

You're certainly not alone in this. It is baffling why things like anxiety and panic attacks can suddenly appear from nowhere as you know well. There must be some sort of trigger. I've suffered many panic attacks and general anxiety over the years, they appeared suddenly when I was in my mid 20's and carried on for about 15 years but for a few years now they have become very rare. Nothing seemed to be the trigger though, they'd just come on after a sudden feeling of extreme fear, really odd. Almost like my mind or imagination would start racing? What helped me out massively was developing deep breathing techniques. When an attack was coming on I'd start to breathe very deeply and very slowly and the attack would subside very quickly. It completely changed things for me! I hope you can work this out soon as it really isn't nice - if you'd like to chat more am very happy to.

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I also suffer with these, although much later in life. The first one I really had was during a power cut one night and I was panicked I wouldn't be able to see again and I couldn't sleep in really dark room for a bit - but it didn't stop there.

I have health issues with my tummy and to cut a long story short, I often panic about not finding a loo in time if i need one, to the point I have had to stay at home, some mornings it is a challenge to walk the five minutes to school. I have a 3 hour long car trip coming up and that really worries me. At times the panics really control my life - i get a tummy ache, i panic makes the pain worst and well you get the point.

I lived with the tummy issue since I was 15, and it didn't bother me until the last few years, which I have put down to losing my dad, and beloved cat in the space of a week while I was pregnant, and having a bad birth where I had to have an op to save my life. The fact I 'lost' the first hour of my babies life while I was being sorted still upsets me to this day.

It's a horrible thing to suffer from and unless you do hard to understand - my hubs tries his best, but i think he thinks i just don't want to go anywhere. I know I need to see someone but going to the Doctors also brings it on too, I'm a bit of a night mare!

;(

 

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Really suprising how many people anxiety/panic effects, and it is a shame many suffer in silence. Alot of comments mention exercise and i have also read this is a good way to reduce anxiety and use up the adrenaline it produces... not to mention the benefits for your health, heart and general wellbeing. So i must start exercising A.S.A.P.

I start CBT therapy again next week through the NHS. It helped me to some degree earlier in year to understand my thought processes and actions that made my panic attacks worse. 

Some useful tips and insight from all who have responded to this thread... thanks and hope it has opened people's eyes to how it can have a massive impact on someone... there life and people around them.

I find it hardest when i'm off from work or have alot of time to ponder and think it over and over which makes it worse and really gets my anxiety levels up... so best to find things to do or distract yourself.

Face your fears to make your brain realise that there is no threat from a certain situation, the more you put yourself in that dreaded situation the easier it gets with time.

 

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