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The Battle of the Somme, 100 years ago.

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36th Ulster Division paid a heavy price. 2069 killed in the first two days, over 5000 casualties. 

It was the price they paid that stopped Lloyd George from creating a fully united Ireland after the war.

 

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54 minutes ago, mountain shadow said:

36th Ulster Division paid a heavy price. 2069 killed in the first two days, over 5000 casualties. 

It was the price they paid that stopped Lloyd George from creating a fully united Ireland after the war.

 

My direct paternal great grandfather was apparently in the trenches during the First World War and lost an arm for his trouble. He as is my father was from Northern Ireland though I'm not sure if he was in the 36th Ulster division or some other regiment, or whether he was at the Somme, as I haven't inquired much about it, though I'm sure my Dad knows. I'll have to ask him about it when I next see him. What I do know is that my paternal grandfather (his son) by coincidence was also shot in the arm during the evacuation from Dunkirk during the Second World War. He volunteered of course as Northern Ireland was the only part of the UK where conscription wasn't introduced. He didn't lose his arm as his father had done but it damaged the nerves and his hand was in an almost clasped position for the rest of his life. Though of course they we're the lucky ones.

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2 hours ago, Weather-history said:

In memory of those who fought and died in the Battle of the Somme, 100 years ago.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Somme

 

Somme-wreath-no2-002.jpg

 

Very sad. Makes you grateful you weren't born 100 years before you were as this would have been hell on earth. A good read about the First World War is a book called 'All quiet on the western front' written by a German soldier recalling his experience. It's very raw, though it brings it home much more clearly than how any historian could relate it, being as it was written by someone who was in the thick of it.

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I've just been looking on Wikipedia about the 36th Ulster Division, and it seems that divisions were made up of several regiments/brigades, which I didn't know before. I can only imagine then that my great grandfather was in it, being of the protestant/unionist community in what is now Northern Ireland. Though I know he lost his arm during this war I'm not sure whether this happened at the Somme (my grandfather told me about it years ago so maybe he said it happened at the Somme but I've forgotten as I would have been a teenager at the time and wasn't so interested in history back then), so would have to ask my dad about it, but I don't see him that often as we're not very close so it could be a couple of weeks or so, but it definitely gives me something to talk about with him when I do. Though most of the men and even my late grandmother on my father's side have served in the British army with my dad been in the Irish guards for example.  Anyway here's a link about the 36th Ulster division, it seems they played a massive role at the Somme:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/36th_(Ulster)_Division

Edited by Walsall Wood Snow

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On 29/06/2016 at 00:02, Walsall Wood Snow said:

Very sad. Makes you grateful you weren't born 100 years before you were as this would have been hell on earth. A good read about the First World War is a book called 'All quiet on the western front' written by a German soldier recalling his experience. It's very raw, though it brings it home much more clearly than how any historian could relate it, being as it was written by someone who was in the thick of it.

"All Quiet on the Western Front" is regarded as a classic, though I've yet to read it.  Might I recommend the Youtube channel "The Great War", which uses British Pathé footage to help document events of this week 100 years ago?  They even had a special video on "All Quiet...".

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Great granddad was gassed in the trenches. He was sent home due to injuries gained from this and died 10 years later because of the irreparable lung damage. Lucky guy I suppose. The war was never discussed in his home.

A truly horrific event where young men were literally forced to the front on pain of execution to needlessly 'die as cattle' . Some in their teens; bairns really, lying with their guts hanging out screaming for their mothers.

On both sides.

There is no glory in war.

Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfed Owen. Killed 7 days before the end of the war, aged 25.

And Flowers of the Forest.

...We hear nae mair liltin at oor yowe-milkin
Women and bairnies are heartless and wae
Sighin and moanin on ilka green loanin -
The Flooers of the Forest are a' wede awa

 

 

Edited by scottish skier
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My Great Granddad was one of the few survivors of the Battle at Mons, they really should teach proper history to kids at school.  

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Whilst commemorating the centenary of the Somme it's perhaps worth remembering that hundreds of thousands of Muslims died fighting with the Allies.

Edited by knocker
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On 4 July 2016 at 14:16, knocker said:

Whilst commemorating the centenary of the Somme it's perhaps worth remembering that hundreds of thousands of Muslims died fighting with the Allies.

..... and also for the enemy of course

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On 7/4/2016 at 14:16, knocker said:

Whilst commemorating the centenary of the Somme it's perhaps worth remembering that hundreds of thousands of Muslims died fighting with the Allies.

So did alot of religions, I hope you remember them aswell 

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Went to an exhibition at our local church yesterday commemorating the local boys who died on the Somme. Most of them were in the 1st Bn Somerset Light Infantry who attacked a German strong point called the Quadrilateral at Fricourt.at 0730 on 1st July 1916 The Somersets lost 463 men killed, wounded, and missing

Edited by 78/79

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