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I've just had another short chat with my friend and I'm starting to get a bit worried. She is obviously very poorly with this bacterial infection and the doctor, who just been, is concerned that the massive doses of antibiotics do not appear to be working. So he has a arranged for scan on the leg which may take up to three days to be done. Seeing she is so ill and not apparently improving I can't help wondering why won't admit her to hospital where she can be monitored. No point in me popping down as she is not up to seeing people.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/05/chemotherapy-may-spread-cancer-trigger-aggressive-tumours-warn/

Chemotherapy found to SPREAD Cancer Throughout the Body, Warn Scientists.

Sources include:

Telegraph.co.uk

STM.ScienceMag.org

Cancer.org

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Collective-Evolution.com

About time it hit mainstream.

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22 minutes ago, Snowyowl9 said:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/05/chemotherapy-may-spread-cancer-trigger-aggressive-tumours-warn/

Chemotherapy found to SPREAD Cancer Throughout the Body, Warn Scientists.

Sources include:

Telegraph.co.uk

STM.ScienceMag.org

Cancer.org

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Collective-Evolution.com

About time it hit mainstream.

Rubbish!!! Are you against immunisation too, btw?:wallbash:

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Happy days my mum is now in remission she has Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) minute or no trace of it her blood I would infer, she's very lucky it was caught relatively early got to thank a blabbering son for that. It's been a long seven years at least it looks like she's out the woods without no hiccups please.

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2 hours ago, Ed Stone said:

Rubbish!!! Are you against immunisation too, btw?:wallbash:

Shows how you`ve been brainwashed over the years.

Radiation causes cancer that's chemo radiation,with hair falling out,always knew chemo was the biggest fraud ever going.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Snowyowl9 said:

Shows how you`ve been brainwashed over the years.

Radiation causes cancer that's chemo radiation,with hair falling out,always knew chemo was the biggest fraud ever going.

 

 

No, you pillock - it's either radiotherapy (cytotoxic radiation) or it's chemotherapy (cytotoxic chemicals)...There's no such thing as 'chemo radiation'!:oops:

Edited by Ed Stone
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3 hours ago, Daniel* said:

Happy days my mum is now in remission she has Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) minute or no trace of it her blood I would infer, she's very lucky it was caught relatively early got to thank a blabbering son for that. It's been a long seven years at least it looks like she's out the woods without no hiccups please.

:yahoo:

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4 hours ago, Snowyowl9 said:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/05/chemotherapy-may-spread-cancer-trigger-aggressive-tumours-warn/

Chemotherapy found to SPREAD Cancer Throughout the Body, Warn Scientists.

Sources include:

Telegraph.co.uk

STM.ScienceMag.org

Cancer.org

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com

Collective-Evolution.com

About time it hit mainstream.

For my sins I work for an Oncologist and yes that is certainly a very interesting scientific finding indeed, will be interesting to see how it develops in the future but I have to say chemotherapy is no fraud, as toxic and as nasty as it is, it does save lives in a huge number of cases although of course sadly not in all cases.  It can also extend the life expectancy and relieve symptoms for a while of some with terminal metastatic disease.

Edited by Snowycat
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1 hour ago, Ed Stone said:

No, you pillock - it's either radiotherapy (cytotoxic radiation) or it's chemotherapy (cytotoxic chemicals)...There's no such thing as 'chemo radiation'!:oops:

Ed, as said above I do work for an oncologist and chemoradiation is treatment, we sent a patient along for some recently.

http://www.macmillan.org.uk/information-and-support/bowel-cancer/rectal/treating/chemoradiation

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8 hours ago, Ed Stone said:

No, you pillock - it's either radiotherapy (cytotoxic radiation) or it's chemotherapy (cytotoxic chemicals)...There's no such thing as 'chemo radiation'!:oops:

For the avoidance of doubt, the term chemoradiation is used when the two forms of treatment are delivered concurrently as distinct from two separate courses.  There is nothing "radioactive" about chemotherapy drugs.

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2 hours ago, ciel said:

For the avoidance of doubt, the term chemoradiation is used when the two forms of treatment are delivered concurrently as distinct from two separate courses.  There is nothing "radioactive" about chemotherapy drugs.

Sorry Snowy. And I stand corrected.

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I had a very good experience today in regard to a cataract removal courtesy of NHS Scotland. 

Admitted 8am, theatre 8.30, discharged 10am.

The unit was busy, but well staffed, and the nurses were excellent.  To be "picky", my only adverse comment would be that the surgeon was rather remote and appeared generally disinterested.

I don't have to hand exact dates, but time from initial referral by the optometrist to surgery was less than three months.

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34 minutes ago, ciel said:

I had a very good experience today in regard to a cataract removal courtesy of NHS Scotland. 

Admitted 8am, theatre 8.30, discharged 10am.

The unit was busy, but well staffed, and the nurses were excellent.  To be "picky", my only adverse comment would be that the surgeon was rather remote and appeared generally disinterested.

I don't have to hand exact dates, but time from initial referral by the optometrist to surgery was less than three months.

Excellent news ciel, The only problem I have had with the day surgery clinics in the past is that if you are near the end of the queue you may not have surgery until the afternoon and that may entail you being kept overnight. Which is what happened to me on the last occasion.

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17 hours ago, ciel said:

I had a very good experience today in regard to a cataract removal courtesy of NHS Scotland. 

Admitted 8am, theatre 8.30, discharged 10am.

The unit was busy, but well staffed, and the nurses were excellent.  To be "picky", my only adverse comment would be that the surgeon was rather remote and appeared generally disinterested.

I don't have to hand exact dates, but time from initial referral by the optometrist to surgery was less than three months.

Hi,

Where was this? My Dad has stopped driving at night as he can barely see with the headlights, his Doctor says he has cataracts yet his doctor wont refer him to have them removed. So frustrating

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14 minutes ago, Daryl Dixon said:

Hi,

Where was this? My Dad has stopped driving at night as he can barely see with the headlights, his Doctor says he has cataracts yet his doctor wont refer him to have them removed. So frustrating

In fact it was my optician who made the referral to Ninewells Hospital, Dundee. As I live in Aberdeenshire but my GP is in Angus, I had the choice of being referred to Aberdeen or Dundee.

I'm surprised at the attitude of your Dad's doc.  Is he one of the old guard? The optician referred me simply on the basis that my vision was interfering to some fairly minor extent with leisure/work activities e.g. reading and also my vision was on the cusp of not meeting the driving standard. The eye consultant had no difficulty in arranging treatment ASAP and the result is amazing, even one day post op. Follow ups will be provided by the referring optician.

It is a rather outdated opinion that cataracts need to "mature" before treatment is recommended.  Hope your Dad manages to this get sorted soon - try his optician.

 

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43 minutes ago, ciel said:

In fact it was my optician who made the referral to Ninewells Hospital, Dundee. As I live in Aberdeenshire but my GP is in Angus, I had the choice of being referred to Aberdeen or Dundee.

I'm surprised at the attitude of your Dad's doc.  Is he one of the old guard? The optician referred me simply on the basis that my vision was interfering to some fairly minor extent with leisure/work activities e.g. reading and also my vision was on the cusp of not meeting the driving standard. The eye consultant had no difficulty in arranging treatment ASAP and the result is amazing, even one day post op. Follow ups will be provided by the referring optician.

It is a rather outdated opinion that cataracts need to "mature" before treatment is recommended.  Hope your Dad manages to this get sorted soon - try his optician.

 

I'm surprised too. He's def one of the old guard.  I'll get him to go to the optician. That's great for you. Pleased it was so quick. That's exactly the response he got that he had to wait til it was worse. Thanks for the reply

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19 minutes ago, Daryl Dixon said:

I'm surprised too. He's def one of the old guard.  I'll get him to go to the optician. That's great for you. Pleased it was so quick. That's exactly the response he got that he had to wait til it was worse. Thanks for the reply

Just one more point - the optician advised me not to minimise any visual difficulties when attending the first eye-clinic appt.  Cataract removal will not actually be recommended as the op does carry some (rare) risks. More that docs are willing to carry out the operation if normal daily activities are affected and the risks are accepted. Maybe your Dad should have a list of inconveniences in mind and emphasise these when visiting the optician.

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3 hours ago, Daryl Dixon said:

Hi,

Where was this? My Dad has stopped driving at night as he can barely see with the headlights, his Doctor says he has cataracts yet his doctor wont refer him to have them removed. So frustrating

Glad it went well for you @ciel, both my mum and father in law have had their Cataract removed and they were equally impressed on how quick the processes was, especially compared to what it was like in the past.

@Daryl Dixon my mum not being able to drive in the dark was the main factor that got my mums op pushed up the list, she lives in a remote area with little public transport, so needed to drive to get about so needed the operation sooner as it was effecting her mobility and lifestyle.  So defiantly a route to take in saying that his life is being effected by not being able to drive. apparently there is a on optimum time of the Cataract development  that they like to remove them, too soon and the risk of infection or other side effects outweighs the reduced vision, and this could be what his doctor is basing his decision on.  

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20 minutes ago, Sardonixs said:

Glad it went well for you @ciel, both my mum and father in law have had their Cataract removed and they were equally impressed on how quick the processes was, especially compared to what it was like in the past.

@Daryl Dixon my mum not being able to drive in the dark was the main factor that got my mums op pushed up the list, she lives in a remote area with little public transport, so needed to drive to get about so needed the operation sooner as it was effecting her mobility and lifestyle.  So defiantly a route to take in saying that his life is being effected by not being able to drive. apparently there is a on optimum time of the Cataract development  that they like to remove them, too soon and the risk of infection or other side effects outweighs the reduced vision, and this could be what his doctor is basing his decision on.  

There is not, as used to be thought, an "optimal" time of cataract development, per se, for surgery.  Modern surgical techniques reduce the operative and post operative risks. In fact, the younger the patient is when the procedure is carried out, the less is the risk of complications. The main criteria for intervention is when an individual perceives the cataract to affect lifestyle and activities of daily living - which can be subjective, I suppose.

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22 minutes ago, ciel said:

There is not, as used to be thought, an "optimal" time of cataract development, per se, for surgery.  Modern surgical techniques reduce the operative and post operative risks. In fact, the younger the patient is when the procedure is carried out, the less is the risk of complications. The main criteria for intervention is when an individual perceives the cataract to affect lifestyle and activities of daily living - which can be subjective, I suppose.

yea thats what was trying to say, if the cataract is not effecting lifestyle then no real need to risk removing them (however small the risk).  Maybe optimal is the wrong word more a crossover when the negative effects outweigh the risks / time etc of removing them.  

 

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I had both cataracts removed nearly 10 years ago on the NHS.and the difference it made was fantastic.I can now see the golf ball 200 yards up the fairway-no problem.Unfortunately it hasn't helped to improve my handicap over the years!:laugh:

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Waited a month for a doctor's appointment, then went to my appointment and it didn't exist on the system so I wasn't seen. I told them to stick their mongoosing surgery where the sun doesn't shine.

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I'm a weird one (I know, shocking!).

When I'm healthy, I'm always borderline anaemic. It's caused lots of issues with blood donation, but they normally let me donate. However every 3 years like clockwork I get immune system problems, I am constantly ill. It starts with a cold, turns into a chest infection, then I get various other bacterial and fungal infections and my glands swell up to the size of snooker balls. I get extremely fatigued, gain weight and feel nauseus and feel generally awful for about 2 months that this process lasts. Then I recover completely within a couple of days.

Now here's the weird thing, when this happens the doctors can find no reason for it, my bloods come back not even close to anemic and they show healthy for all levels, which clearly shouldn't be the case because of how ill I get. Essentially my bloods look better when I'm ill! This occurred again this year after occurring roughly the same time in 2014, 2011 and 2008. In fact when I went in to the doctors to try and find a solution, she commented that 'it's that time again!'.

They have no concerns and they can find no reason why it happens, but it's a mystery. All my doctor could say was that my body appeared to completely malfunctions and not to worry about it. So it's all a bit weird. Waiting for body malfunction 2020!

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39 minutes ago, Lauren said:

I'm a weird one (I know, shocking!).

When I'm healthy, I'm always borderline anaemic. It's caused lots of issues with blood donation, but they normally let me donate. However every 3 years like clockwork I get immune system problems, I am constantly ill. It starts with a cold, turns into a chest infection, then I get various other bacterial and fungal infections and my glands swell up to the size of snooker balls. I get extremely fatigued, gain weight and feel nauseus and feel generally awful for about 2 months that this process lasts. Then I recover completely within a couple of days.

Now here's the weird thing, when this happens the doctors can find no reason for it, my bloods come back not even close to anemic and they show healthy for all levels, which clearly shouldn't be the case because of how ill I get. Essentially my bloods look better when I'm ill! This occurred again this year after occurring roughly the same time in 2014, 2011 and 2008. In fact when I went in to the doctors to try and find a solution, she commented that 'it's that time again!'.

They have no concerns and they can find no reason why it happens, but it's a mystery. All my doctor could say was that my body appeared to completely malfunctions and not to worry about it. So it's all a bit weird. Waiting for body malfunction 2020!

Lauren, have you ever been tested for Lupus?....It's an autoimmune condition..The reason I ask, is that for years I had unexplained & seemingly unrelated symptoms....periodic fatigue, skin rashes, colds, infections, and joint pains which normally last for a few days up to a few weeks then completely disappear......Eventually I was diagnosed with lupus last year.

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