Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Spikecollie

The Zika virus

Recommended Posts

Here in continental Europe there are plenty of nasty insect borne diseases. They mainly affect immuno-compromised people but can still affect the well. In the UK there is Lyme disease from ticks, but this Zika virus is not nice.

Most people afflicted get a flu-like illness, maybe less, but the effect on foetuses is potentially horrible,

It is potentially expected to arrive here in France in May with the awakening of the Tigre moustique (mosquito) and with warming will spread, with human vectors, further north. Could this be one of our growth inhibiting factors? Not nice, but...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm certainly not qualified but an extract from the Economist

On January 15th America’s Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advised pregnant women not to travel to countries where Zika is circulating.

The virus was first isolated in 1947, from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda. Since then it has caused small and sporadic outbreaks in parts of Africa and South-East Asia. In Brazil, for reasons yet unclear, it quickly flared into an epidemic after its arrival—by official estimates infecting as many as 1.5m people.

Alarm bells started ringing in October, when doctors in Pernambuco, one of Brazil’s north-eastern states, saw a huge increase in babies born with microcephaly: an abnormally small head, often with consequent brain damage. In the next four months more than 3,500 cases of microcephaly were reported in Brazil. That compared with fewer than 200 a year in the five years before 2015. None of the known causes of the condition—which include genetic abnormalities, drugs, alcohol, rubella infection and exposure to some chemicals during pregnancy—seemed a plausible culprit.

Last week, CDC scientists announced the best evidence so far that Zika can pass from mother to fetus: they found the virus in four Brazilian babies with microcephaly who had died in the womb or shortly after birth. Previously, Brazilian researchers had found Zika in the amniotic fluid of women carrying fetuses with microcephaly.

There is another fear. After Zika arrived in Brazil, and also in El Salvador, both saw a sharp increase in severe neurological and autoimmune problems, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, which can lead to paralysis. These also surged in French Polynesia after Zika broke out there in 2013.

20160123_STC974_0.png

The spread of Zika makes attacking disease-carrying mosquitoes all the more important. Mostly, Zika is transmitted by Aedes aegypti, which is also the vector of dengue and yellow fever. This insect lives in tropical climes, but Aedes albopictus, found as far north as New York and Chicago, and in parts of southern Europe, can also do the job, though it is not clear how efficiently. A paper published last week in the Lancet shows where Zika could become endemic (see map). But places where air-conditioning, screened windows and mosquito control are the norm are unlikely to see outbreaks flare up.

http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21688849-newly-emerging-disease-threatening-americas-virus-chequers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

El Nino effect on this too (WHO Director General):

'...the situation could yet deteriorate as "this year's El Nino weather patterns are expected to increase mosquito populations greatly in many areas".'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-35427493

Presumably an increase in global temperatures will also have a significant impact on insect-borne infections outside the El Nino phenomenon. Worrying times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems that two threads were started concerning this topic. Not that I am interested in making any particular issue about it but why was mine dumped when it started first.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scary stuff, I hope it never reaches the mosquitoes in this country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Snipper said:

Seems that two threads were started concerning this topic. Not that I am interested in making any particular issue about it but why was mine dumped when it started first.?

I decided to keep this one open in the serious discussion area, as this tends to attract more viewers/posters and it's certainly worthy of a serious discussion. Sorry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Attempting to wipe out mosquitoes seems a pretty desperate option which can only ever work in limited areas.
Chemical methods must kill many other insects too.
It sounds like a classic case where Genetic modification is the best hope by far for a more realistic way to proceed - introducing a dominant resistant gene to the existing mosquito population.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 4wd said:

Attempting to wipe out mosquitoes seems a pretty desperate option which can only ever work in limited areas.
Chemical methods must kill many other insects too.
It sounds like a classic case where Genetic modification is the best hope by far for a more realistic way to proceed - introducing a dominant resistant gene to the existing mosquito population.
 

 

Wiping out mosquitoes would be very bad i mean species that relies on them... and so on... its a stupid idea 

 

Now the Zika virus could spread far and wide with the Olympics being in Brazil.. In some cases it can spread via saliva and seaman to what extent is unknown 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Snipper said:

Seems that two threads were started concerning this topic. Not that I am interested in making any particular issue about it but why was mine dumped when it started first.?

Sorry Snipper it was my fault! Can we just keep on talking happily?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, lfcdude said:

 

Wiping out mosquitoes would be very bad i mean species that relies on them... and so on... its a stupid idea 

Perhaps you would care to expand on that because the idea of fighting mosquitoes has a long history. Aedes aegypti, the species that carries not only Zika but dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever, was almost eliminated from much of South America by the early 1960s, after a long anti-dengue campaign. The insects were killed with frequent fumigation. Health workers visited households to urge people to mop up standing water, where mosquitoes breed. But some countries slackened their efforts too soon. After the number of cases fell, politicians’ attention waned. And the mosquitoes returned in their buzzing billions.

That campaign was led by the American regional branch of the World Health Organisation. It now needs to rally governments for a new push. Brazil is mobilising its armed forces for a nationwide door-to-door information campaign; other affected countries should do likewise. In poorer countries, donors could pay for ad campaigns, new health workers, insect repellents, insecticides and bed nets. If reservoirs of the virus are not to remain, ready to re-emerge, action is needed across the territory where Zika is at large and also in places, such as the subtropical parts of the United States on the Gulf of Mexico, where it is sure soon to arrive.

Research into novel ways to kill mosquitoes also deserves more funding. Genetic modification, which produces mosquitoes that are sterile but still attractive to other mosquitoes, shows promise. A trial in Brazil suggests that releasing swarms of modified insects can reduce the unmodified population in months.

So if all of this is stupid perhaps you would be good enough to enlighten us as to the clever approach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U.S. Case of Zika Infection Transmitted by Sex Reported in Texas

Quote

A case of Zika virus infection transmitted by sex, rather than mosquito bite, was reported in Texas on Monday.

The Dallas County Health and Human Services Department reported that a patient with Zika virus was infected after having sex with an ill individual who had returned from Venezuela, where Zika is circulating.

No other identifying information was given.

“This increases our awareness campaign in educating the public about protecting themselves and others,” said Zachary Thompson, the health department director, in a prepared statement. “Next to abstinence, condoms are the best prevention method against sexually transmitted infections.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/03/health/zika-sex-transmission-texas.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still to be confirmed.. The one you've really got to watch out for is one that transmits as easily as a common cold. This one has a possible side effect of producing a generation gap. As to how serious it really is time will tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, weirpig said:

The pope says contraception maybe used in certain areas to avoid infection.  Thats nice of him  what a joke religion really is .http://news.sky.com/story/1644402/pope-may-accept-contraception-in-zika-areas

Aye the pill and a condom r going to stop you getting bitten 

http://news.sky.com/story/1643778/scientists-close-in-on-zika-link-with-paralysis

Scientists say they are on the verge of confirming that Zika is the cause of the paralysing condition Guillain-Barre.

 

"It is terrible. It’s a mosquito. Only one bite and 15, 20 days later you are going to be in intensive care. These patients have families."

We tracked down the family of Alix Mulato.

A month ago the 45-year-old was a stout sugar cane worker.

But he contracted Zika and then developed Guillain-Barre.

Now he is paralysed, brain damaged and beyond medical help.

His wife, Elizabeth Ramos, showed us video of him lying under a net in intensive care.

"My husband was a very healthy man," she said.

"For our family it is a complete tragedy. We have been together a long time, with our sons.

"We don't understand. Why him? Why him?"

In Cali’s University Hospital we found Sandra Tamayo, another patient who developed Guillain-Barre shortly after contracting Zika.

Her face is paralysed.

She can't blink, and struggles to move her mouth.

She wept as she told me that she hasn't allowed her daughter to visit since being admitted two weeks ago for fear of frightening her.

"The situation is terrible, really terrible," she said.

"I can't express anything. If I am smiling inside I can't express it.

"It's like wearing a mask."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...