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Should we keep the #NameOurStorms scheme?  

197 members have voted

  1. 1. Should we keep the #NameOurStorms scheme?

    • Yes, I like it!
    • No, it's a waste of time.
    • Not bothered.


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I didn't like the idea initially but I'm warming to it now. Makes it easier to refer to past storms when they're named, rather than the [insert date here] storm.

Is there a chance of dust being whipped up like what Ophelia did? That was quite a sight t o behold here, especially observing my solar radiation sensor. These images weren't doctored, I just adj

and this year it's been extended from just WIND, to wind, rain/flooding and snow!

Posted Images

Posted
  • Location: Poole, Dorset 42m ASL
  • Location: Poole, Dorset 42m ASL
    1 hour ago, Summer Sun said:

    One death sadly reported now in Dorset from today's severe weather. 

     

    So may the Met Office might wake up now, with a reported death, as commented in the report "At the time of the incident, severe weather conditions swept across Dorset, with heavy rain showers and high winds."

    10622831
    WWW.BOURNEMOUTHECHO.CO.UK

    A WOMAN was killed in an East Dorset car crash after a tree fell on the vehicle she was driving.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    When is a storm named?

    The criteria we use for naming storms is based on our National Severe Weather Warnings service. This is based on a combination of both the impact the weather may have, and the likelihood of those impacts occurring. 

    A storm will be named when it has the potential to cause an amber or red warning.

    Other weather types will also be considered, specifically rain if its impact could lead to flooding as advised by the Environment Agency, SEPA and Natural Resources Wales flood warnings. Therefore 'storms systems' could be named on the basis of impacts from the wind but also include the impacts of rain and snow.

    https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/warnings-and-advice/uk-storm-centre/index

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Yet again an amber warning issue with significant flooding reported in parts of Sheffield with cars completely submerged and no name

    Makes you wonder what will be needed before the met will start naming these events. Whilst the area getting the worst weather was admittedly narrow it has caused major impacts

     

     

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
  • Location: Co Dublin, Ireland
    On 19/03/2019 at 12:17, Paul said:

    A good idea ruined by bad implementation I think. 

    I'm not sure I follow the argument.

    You have three agencies now naming the storms - UK, Ireland, Netherlands (new for this year).

    Storms affect each country differently or not at all.

    I would suggest your dispute is best aimed at the UK media. "90 MPH KILL STORM *NAME* ON THE WAY"

    I like the naming system personally. It makes a lot of sense and I think it works well even if warning systems are different. 

     

    Edited by The Eagle
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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: East Lothian
  • Weather Preferences: Not too hot, excitement of snow, a hoolie
  • Location: East Lothian

    Quick round up of #NameourStorms 19/20

    Met Eireann 1, UK Met Office 0 KNMI 0

    NHC 1 and IPMA 1 

    1912stormnames.png

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    • 4 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: East Lothian
  • Weather Preferences: Not too hot, excitement of snow, a hoolie
  • Location: East Lothian

    Storm Brendan named by Met Eireann for Winds. 

    Combination of strong winds, high gusts, heavy rain, line convection along with storm surge, large waves and high tides leading to risk of coastal flooding.

    A significant event for Ireland and Western Isles. Squall line of note crossed Ireland and UK. Snow overnight for Highlands.

    Parts of England and Wales are seeing stronger winds today from a different low, but as only Yellow warnings in place - no Named storm

    jan13brendanwarns.png

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    Posted
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.
  • Weather Preferences: Gales, T-storms, Heavy Rain, Heat, Cold - Love it all.
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.

    51mph recorded at my station. Much worse than yesterday for this location.

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    Posted
  • Location: Cleeve, North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Continental winters & summers.
  • Location: Cleeve, North Somerset

    Recent gust of 39mph, so on a par with yesterday, other than the few minutes the squall went through when I hit 48mph.

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    Posted
  • Location: Ashford, Kent
  • Weather Preferences: Over 18C please!
  • Location: Ashford, Kent

    Yup! Storm Brendan blew down my greenhouse doors yesterday, the wind is stronger today, doing more damage, yet it isn't a named storm....what's that all about? What does it need for a storm to be named? Either the Met are going to name them - or not. I don't care either way, but the present system makes little sense to me!

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    Posted
  • Location: Motherwell
  • Weather Preferences: windy
  • Location: Motherwell

    I think it has to bring an amber warning to become a named storm.Personally i've always thought the Irish met have a slightly lower threshold for each warning and a stormy spell in Ireland could have very limited effects on the UK mainland so i don't think storms should be named by the met unless it's got an amber warning for somewhere in the UK.

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    Posted
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.
  • Weather Preferences: Gales, T-storms, Heavy Rain, Heat, Cold - Love it all.
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.
    14 minutes ago, Ross90 said:

    I think it has to bring an amber warning to become a named storm.Personally i've always thought the Irish met have a slightly lower threshold for each warning and a stormy spell in Ireland could have very limited effects on the UK mainland so i don't think storms should be named by the met unless it's got an amber warning for somewhere in the UK.

    There have been numerous times when an amber warning was issued for a storm, but no name was given.

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    Posted
  • Location: Kent,Ashford
  • Weather Preferences: Love heat & thunderstorms, but despise Winter
  • Location: Kent,Ashford

    Funny, when we get a storm that has been named it normally isn't as bad as what they say it will be. But when we get a storm that doesn't have a name, it's a storm that SHOULD have a name as most of the time the unamed storm is worse then the named one.

    Edited by Atmogenic
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    Posted
  • Location: Carlisle, Cumbria
  • Weather Preferences: Atlantic storms, severe gales, blowing snow and frost :)
  • Location: Carlisle, Cumbria

    I think today’s deepening wave should’ve been named, 50-60mph gusts recorded at some inland locations, 70mph+ around some coasts. 
     

    The UKMET seem reluctant to name any storms, usually Met Éireann and it’s only because this system went over England and Wales they didn’t name it. 

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    Posted
  • Location: Benson, Oxfordshire
  • Location: Benson, Oxfordshire

    Is this still considered to be part of storm Brendan? Spawn of Brendan? Separate entity? Where I am, think a yellow warning for wind was fair today.  Only significant winds yesterday were in the evening squall.  Today has been persistently windier than yesterday, but not sure it's worthy of a name. Really, they're damned if they do and damned if they don't ?‍♀️

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    Posted
  • Location: on a canal , probably near Northampton...
  • Weather Preferences: extremes n snow
  • Location: on a canal , probably near Northampton...

    Completely different low pressure system.....and luckily no loss of life in Berkshire..

    Headline said Brendan when I posted it, let's see how long it takes to get changed.

    _110511899_saud2.jpg
    WWW.BBC.CO.UK

    Emergency services are at the scene, but no-one is believed to be injured.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Poole, Dorset 42m ASL
  • Location: Poole, Dorset 42m ASL
    17 hours ago, Frosty hollows said:

    Is this still considered to be part of storm Brendan? Spawn of Brendan? Separate entity? Where I am, think a yellow warning for wind was fair today.  Only significant winds yesterday were in the evening squall.  Today has been persistently windier than yesterday, but not sure it's worthy of a name. Really, they're damned if they do and damned if they don't ?‍♀️

    Here's something I posted in the SW thread:

    Interesting comment from the MetO, even though we know their perspective on these weather events, from the local rag:

    [email protected]

     · 3h

    @Petagna @metoffice why didn't we have Storm Ciara yesterday? Surely the disruption and damaged caused by the secondary low (public don't care the technicalities I think) was enough to warrant the UK Met Office naming it?

    Met Office✔@metoffice

    Hi there, our warnings are based on likelihood and impacts. Brendan was named by the Irish Met Service and it was decided the last system didn't warrant naming.

    Call it what you flippin like, it still resulted in localised flooding, trees downed, roads blocked, rail services stopped, ferry services suspended. OH YES, and the Environment Agency issued FLOOD warnings urging immediate action have been issued in coastal areas of Dorset as tidal surges

    So much for your likelihood and impacts analysis..

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    • 5 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: East Lothian
  • Weather Preferences: Not too hot, excitement of snow, a hoolie
  • Location: East Lothian

    Has worked very well for the major events in February 2020, #StormCiara  - wind storm with heavy rain and flooding and raising awareness for current #StormDennis

    which brings a significant risk of flooding the weekend after. Heavy rain, snow melt, already sodden ground, half-term so some different  travel  plans. 

     

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: East Lothian
  • Weather Preferences: Not too hot, excitement of snow, a hoolie
  • Location: East Lothian

    All gone a bit awry on the naming list as AEMET (Spanish Met service) nipped in before Met Eireann to name the weekend low. So #StormJorge  (Hor-hay   first H as in loch) is this weekend's low 29th Feb not Storm Ellen. Red wind warning for western counties of Ireland. Wind/Rain and snow warnings for UK. Thread https://www.netweather.tv/forum/topic/93312-storm-jorge-named-by-aemet-spain/page/2/?tab=comments#comment-4143523 Spain has had yellow and orange wind warnings with large waves for the NW and ongoing wind and rain/snow warnings into the new week. 

     

    StormNAmesfeb20.png

    feb29jorgewarnpressure.png

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    Posted
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.
  • Weather Preferences: Gales, T-storms, Heavy Rain, Heat, Cold - Love it all.
  • Location: The Purbeck Microclimate, Dorset.

    The wind warning down here is a joke. 50mph gusts last night, no warning. 35 - 40mph gusts today, yellow warning. It simply cannot be defended.

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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam
    On 28 December 2015 at 15:59, Weather-history said:

    Derrick Ryall, Head of the Public Weather Service at the Met Office, said: "The aim of this pilot is to provide a single authoritative naming system for the storms that affect UK and Ireland. 

     

     

    And there is the problem, there isn't a single authoritative naming system for storms that affect UK and Ireland. 

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    Posted
  • Location: Brongest,Wales
  • Weather Preferences: Stormy autumn, hot and sunny summer and thunderstorms all year round.
  • Location: Brongest,Wales
    18 minutes ago, Mapantz said:

    The wind warning down here is a joke. 50mph gusts last night, no warning. 35 - 40mph gusts today, yellow warning. It simply cannot be defended.

    I agree although 40mph gusts to me are still the beginning threshold of a yellow warning.

    If the max gusts were only 30mph then I agree that a yellow warning wouldn't be warranted as the only thing that would come down in that are dead or rotten branches or trees.

    Edited by wimblettben
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