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solarcycle

Ideas on how to fund the NHS

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So I've been thinking of  ways to increase funding to the NHS and was hoping to get discussion of ideas going. Firstly I would impose large fines £1000+ to those who waste A&E time and make idiotic calls to 999. This would include drunks and people are generally thick e.g. the story of the woman who called 999 to check how long to cook her Christmas turkey. Of course I'd exempt anyone who lacked mental capacity, like someone with learning difficulties.

 

For 'unnecessary' A&E visits which I'd class as going with a cough, cold, minor injury we should give people the benefit of the doubt as some serious conditions can manifest through relatively minor symptoms. For those who present with 'unnecessary' visits I'd suggest a figure of £20 as a charge. Not so punitive, but also makes it clear that wasting resources incurs a cost. Same caveat as above with those lacking capacity.

 

To improve organ donation rates and therefore the cost of those on transplant waiting lists for long periods  I suggest revoking the right of relatives to object to organ donation if you've chosen to donate. It is your body and your choice, why should anyone else have a say. Also people should have to opt out of organ donation, not opt in. This has been proven to increase organ donation rates in countries where it has been implemented. 

 

Also to create facilities that are purely to make profit. These would be totally separate facilities that do not take resources from existing NHS facilities and employ surgeons etc who would have been in private practice anyway. They would also be only for totally elective and unnecessary procedures. I envisage a place where all the super rich who frequent London could go to get their plastic surgery. With all profits back to the NHS!

 

Of course I'd want to see current government NHS funding remain at the same levels and not cut further if it starts to generate additional funds.

 

Just a start. Anyone else have any ideas?

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Phase out employee NI and progressively shift to Income Tax, as income tax doesn't have the NI ceiling. I suspect one on the principle reasons NI has survived given it's not and never has been a hypothecated tax nor an insurance fund is that it gives the illusion of much lower Income Tax rates!

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The best way of saving the NHS would be to eliminate the Conservative Party? Each and every time that shower gains power, the NHS descends into near-bankruptcy. I suspect deliberate ideologically-driven fiscal malfeasance.

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The best way of saving the NHS would be to eliminate the Conservative Party? Each and every time that shower gains power, the NHS descends into near-bankruptcy. I suspect deliberate ideologically-driven fiscal malfeasance.

 

I was tempted to say blowing away the internal market in England's NHS, but one of the reasons for spend per head being higher in England is because of the accumulated costs of so many top down reorganisations.

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So I've been thinking of  ways to increase funding to the NHS and was hoping to get discussion of ideas going. Firstly I would impose large fines £1000+ to those who waste A&E time and make idiotic calls to 999. This would include drunks and people are generally thick e.g. the story of the woman who called 999 to check how long to cook her Christmas turkey. Of course I'd exempt anyone who lacked mental capacity, like someone with learning difficulties.

 

For 'unnecessary' A&E visits which I'd class as going with a cough, cold, minor injury we should give people the benefit of the doubt as some serious conditions can manifest through relatively minor symptoms. For those who present with 'unnecessary' visits I'd suggest a figure of £20 as a charge. Not so punitive, but also makes it clear that wasting resources incurs a cost. Same caveat as above with those lacking capacity.

 

To improve organ donation rates and therefore the cost of those on transplant waiting lists for long periods  I suggest revoking the right of relatives to object to organ donation if you've chosen to donate. It is your body and your choice, why should anyone else have a say. Also people should have to opt out of organ donation, not opt in. This has been proven to increase organ donation rates in countries where it has been implemented. 

 

Also to create facilities that are purely to make profit. These would be totally separate facilities that do not take resources from existing NHS facilities and employ surgeons etc who would have been in private practice anyway. They would also be only for totally elective and unnecessary procedures. I envisage a place where all the super rich who frequent London could go to get their plastic surgery. With all profits back to the NHS!

 

Of course I'd want to see current government NHS funding remain at the same levels and not cut further if it starts to generate additional funds.

 

Just a start. Anyone else have any ideas?

Those all sound like good ideas I think. I know some hospitals do have the elective surgery thing you talk of. It's probably a must these days. Some hospitals have minor injury only units rather than full A and E departments, they deal with stitches and breaks, sprains. That does tend to work to leave A and E departments more room to deal with proper emergencies. But you do still get people turning up with these things at the A and E departments regardless but less so.

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How about scrapping that rich man's trainset they're insisting on building? That would be a good start.

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Getting rid of agency staff ,some agencies being paid a grand a day for staff so that would be a start ...

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How about scrapping that rich man's trainset they're insisting on building? That would be a good start.

What! And deprive the lords & ladies of a full-scale Hornby 00? :rofl:

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I'd ban all politicians (of whatever party) from meddling with it, and actually get the best people to run it based on their skills, qualifications etc, rather than just a random set of individuals who get tasked with it on the basis that their particular party won an election. 

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What! And deprive the lords & ladies of a full-scale Hornby 00? :rofl:

utter waste of money ,why would I want to get to London 1 hour quicker when I don't ever go there ...

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Putting all the NHS money on the dead cert running tomorrow  2.30 at Ascot. :good:

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I'd ban all politicians (of whatever party) from meddling with it, and actually get the best people to run it based on their skills, qualifications etc, rather than just a random set of individuals who get tasked with it on the basis that their particular party won an election. 

 

I'd make that the case for all areas! Rather than having politics and history graduates dictating policies regarding science for example.

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I'd ban all politicians (of whatever party) from meddling with it, and actually get the best people to run it based on their skills, qualifications etc, rather than just a random set of individuals who get tasked with it on the basis that their particular party won an election. 

 

Oddly enough the NHS execs who lead failing trusts often get paid more than the Prime Minister. I'm not defending politicians but they aren't the worst dead wood in the wage bill.

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Oddly enough the NHS execs who lead failing trusts often get paid more than the Prime Minister. I'm not defending politicians but they aren't the worst dead wood in the wage bill.

But, aren't health professionals worth (in the human sense) a fair bit more than accountants and party hacks?

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£100 for each BMI point above the ideal for your height. Collected every year.

Massive amounts of NHS money are spent each year on fatties whose knees and hips have given up.

Of course, you'd be exempt if it was 'because of your glands' or you are just 'big boned'.

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A dent in the growing obesity epidemic would be a great start.

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But, aren't health professionals worth (in the human sense) a fair bit more than accountants and party hacks?

Not the health professionals. The management consultant hacks and CEOs.

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1) A complete review of every service the NHS offers - there is no reason the taxpayer should be paying for transgender operations and hymen replacements.

 

2) Require all full time employees to purchase private outpatient insurance. 

 

The gains from these policies can be redirected back into the NHS.

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1) A complete review of every service the NHS offers - there is no reason the taxpayer should be paying for transgender operations and hymen replacements.

 

2) Require all full time employees to purchase private outpatient insurance. 

 

The gains from these policies can be redirected back into the NHS.

a proxy tax ,two tier Heath service ??.

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1) A complete review of every service the NHS offers - there is no reason the taxpayer should be paying for transgender operations and hymen replacements.

 

2) Require all full time employees to purchase private outpatient insurance. 

 

The gains from these policies can be redirected back into the NHS.

 

Hymen replacement! Blimey that's virgin on the ridiculous :whistling:

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a proxy tax ,two tier Heath service ??.

 

Only for outpatient services. It's cheap but stuff like foot specialists on the NHS cause large ques.

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Copy the French healthcare system. Best one in Europe.

 

Just asked Mrs SS.

 

She prefers the Scottish NHS to the (sort of part private) French healthcare system.

 

It wasn't standards of care, which are comparable, and the French system is a little quicker for minor ailments, but the fact you have to pay up front in France and there's lots of forms to fill in to get costs covered back from the government. Too much money wasted on associated bureaucracy that could be spent on service, making it less cost-efficient.

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In the first place the NHS is top heavy and riddled with bureaucracy and controlled by some people who are receiving salaries far above their levels of competence.

 

If we think this through, what do we need first and foremost and the answer will be the doctors and nurses who are looking after our sick everyday of their working lives- It as a hard responsible 24/7 profession and as such these people should be encouraged to stay within the service by investing more in training, pay and conditions - it was a kick in teeth to award nurses at the most a 1% rise or less if this increase coincided with an incremental pay rise whilst  MP's who ultimately make decisions relating to the NHS are in the process of awarding themselves far more. 

 

It is a false economy - far better to treat the staff fairly and with more respect and a positive career structure where they can feel happy, respected and fulfilled rather than be being disgruntled and going on the 'bank' for better money and conditions as these opportunities present themselves meaning that they can return to their former hospitals at a much inflated cost by the time you take their wages and the costs/profits to the agency.

 

There is a lot of high tech machinery used to treat people these days and these machines need technicians to look after them - I'm not sure whether it would be cheaper to retain in house staff to look after this or a specialist company, probably the latter in this case but when it comes down to the nitty gritty of keeping hospitals clean and up to the level of hygiene we all expect then the NHS should have continued to use in house staff. For one thing not only are they paying for the cleaners but they are also paying for the operators of the company employing them - not only that there is also the question of having them under the direct control and discipline of the hospital authorities where if necessary they can take direct action rather than leaving it to the third party.

 

Then we have the problem of administrators, some of whom have ben shown to be surprisingly incompetent. They are paid far in excess of their worth, those higher up the scale tend to build themselves little empires which is likely to ameliorate their pay grade even more and for what? Ten people doing a job which could possibly be done by two or three, The layers of management need to be pruned and more efficient methods devised.

 

It has to be said that no matter what budget is allocated to a hospital or other NHS establishment there are going to be times when this is overrun - we cannot predict what disasters or pandemics may come along and bite us in the butt, so there has to be contingency funds available to cater for these.  

 

I agree that there is also a lot of unnecessary waste of resources by certain members of the public in going for treatment when perhaps it is not needed but many are not to know this and sometimes relatively minor symptoms can be caused by some more serious conditions so I do not think we can complain too strongly about that but what we can complain about is the number of times people make appointments for medical care and just do not turn up without making any effort to cancel should the appointment be no longer needed. The time of health staff is important and it does have a cost so therefore there could be a system of fines imposed which could be administered relatively easily. Where people fail to pay the details could be handed over to the magistrates courts who have a system for recovering unpaid fines. 

 

As for drunks, usually the authors of their own predicaments the emergency departments of hospitals are not the place where they should be going - they usually disrupt the service provided for those more genuinely in need and would be better placed in the drunk cell at their local police station or placed in the care of somebody still in a state to look after them. Staff at police stations are usually well trained and with sufficient savvy to tell the difference between what is normally drunk and what is illness and are trained that if there is ant doubt qualified medical advice should be sought.

 

The other bug bear and drain on the NHS are the civil claims, some of which can be quite frivolous, made and here litigation can build up into immense sums. We have to accept two things here, the first is that there is an element of risk in all treatments - some people have an adverse reaction to prescribed drugs and no operation is never without risk. The other is that with the best will in the world medical staff are still human and like the rest of us can still make mistakes.

 

Whilst it is accepted that medical staff have a duty of care for their patients it can happen that that a genuine mistake can have very serious effects.

 

We need this to be recognised and a system developed whereby when these do happen they can be investigated internally and fairly without the need of the patients going to Messrs 'Wefleecem & Wefleecem Solicitors who would add enormously to the costs of any compensation.

 

Then we have the costs of drugs which I believe are bought from the drug companies by each of the individual health authorities yet if these were to combine and a procurement service devised for the whole of the NHS en bloc a much stronger bargaining position could be evolved with reduced costs for the whole service.

 

So the end result is that the NHS needs to be looked at bearing all the above in mind and perhaps some others I haven't thought of in order to develop a common sense system which is considered understandable and fair which should recuperate a lot of the money we as taxpayers perceive to be wasted.

 

The law could be amended in order to decrease the number of claims to the NHS by adding parameters necessary to pursue such a claim, whilst the NHS would be obliged to investigate fairly and where appropriate compensate those who suffered injury as a result of their contact with the NHS without the need to go to expensive civil litigation with an ombudsman to adjudicate in matters of disagreement.

 

Having said all this I have been an NHS patient myself on a number of occasions some of which literally saved my life, so that overall I have respect and admiration for the undervalued people at the sharp end.      

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