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knocker

Maps

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I love looking at maps. Is that weird? One of my favourite things to do in Geography was doing OS map work.

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I'm with you on that Lauren. I've got some old os maps ,and I love looking at just general road maps of the UK as well.....

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Love maps and scares me how few of the up and coming generation have no idea how to navigate without a digital device to hand.

 

Have a growing collection of OS maps of interesting areas, old ones but apart from roads the terrain pretty much remains the same, and brought for a £1 each.

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I love looking at maps. Is that weird? One of my favourite things to do in Geography was doing OS map work.

 

Nothing weird about it. For example if you are interested in the history of an area they are a mine (no pun intended) of information. The mining areas around here are a very good example.

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Love maps and scares me how few of the up and coming generation have no idea how to navigate without a digital device to hand.

Have a growing collection of OS maps of interesting areas, old ones but apart from roads the terrain pretty much remains the same, and brought for a £1 each.

I don't use gps at all even on american road trips , map reading adds to your spacial awereness to you location and is fun :)..

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Love looking at maps, especially OS type of walking areas, even if the areas are where I'm unlikely to ever set foot.

The interest in picking a map up is still there but Google Earth and similar brings a whole new dimension to any geography nut like me.

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Seems I am not alone! I also love looking at maps, particularly looking for amusing place names and wondering the historical reasoning behind them!

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Love looking at maps, especially OS type of walking areas, even if the areas are where I'm unlikely to ever set foot.

The interest in picking a map up is still there but Google Earth and similar brings a whole new dimension to any geography nut like me.

A local A-Z, UK road map and world atlas were my holy trinity of reading as a kid.

 

These days I spend an inordinate amount of time navigating through Google Earth & Street View.

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Love maps and scares me how few of the up and coming generation have no idea how to navigate without a digital device to hand.

 

Have a growing collection of OS maps of interesting areas, old ones but apart from roads the terrain pretty much remains the same, and brought for a £1 each.

Satellite navigation systems are brilliant, especially if you're driving by yourself in unfamiliar places, but I always like to verify my route with a physical map or atlas looking at names, directions, road types etc.. Out in the countryside I can use both a map and compass, and a GPS and I think that the skills for both way finding methods should be taught - a map and compass don't run out of battery power, but a GPS can see through fog!

 

I too love old maps, looking at how areas have developed and changed over time, but also how some features (even man made ones) remain constant...

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If you go to a place on wikipedia, under the map on the right is its coordinates.  When you click on that, you go to a whole load of different maps

eg for Cardiff: https://tools.wmflabs.org/geohack/geohack.php?pagename=Cardiff&params=51_29_N_3_11_W_type:city(324800)_region:GB-CRF

 

Where's the path is also good for having 2 maps side by side http://wtp2.appspot.com/wheresthepath.htm

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Satellite navigation systems are brilliant, especially if you're driving by yourself in unfamiliar places, but I always like to verify my route with a physical map or atlas looking at names, directions, road types etc.. Out in the countryside I can use both a map and compass, and a GPS and I think that the skills for both way finding methods should be taught - a map and compass don't run out of battery power, but a GPS can see through fog!

 

I too love old maps, looking at how areas have developed and changed over time, but also how some features (even man made ones) remain constant...

I agree, used as a back up to maps a GPS device is clever and helpful but far too many have total reliance on the things and like you say maps do not run out of power in the middle of no where.

 

Would hate to be out without a printed map when on a long walk in open terrain.

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I am an absolute map lover and have been since my earliest memories. I can spend hours pouring over maps and atlases and have a wide ranging library of maps of all types, from the UK, to Europe and the rest of the world. I have maps produced by the Red Army should they have invaded! Street maps, terrain maps, world war maps, new and old OS maps and nautical charts.

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I used to collect old atlases when I was growing up..mainly from 1850-1950 always fascinated how borders changed over time and how areas, towns and city names changed as the borders moved.

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When clearing out my grandparents place we found a big old times atlas, was printed 1962, and looking through it was amazed at how much the world has changed in terms of countries names, occupation of etc

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I really enjoy going through maps especially historical maps and observing and analysing development over time. Even going on street view you can now look at the old images and compare them with the newer updates. Will be particularly fascinating in the future supposing they keep updating it. One day the 2009 images will seem ancient!

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Classic example this evening when I was looking for a shorter route to somewhere here in Limousin where I have been many times before. I'd reviewed the route on Google Earth, visually, and already knew the terrain and towns, but would the damn satnav cooperate - turn left down some road to nowhere, perform a u-turn when possible? I shut it off (after various ****off expletives and followed the town names I'd memorised from my trusty map and it halved the time! Satnav got a good virtual spanking and now knows the route...

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I use google earth to pre visualise routes ,especially in strange cities .

I use google street view to look at areas to live especially when you see a house or flat...estate agents only ever show you the inside pics and maybe one of the outside...so look on street view to see if its next to an incinerator or the house next door has old wrecked cars in the garden etc.

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I've used a number of historic maps to research the local area mainly mining related. There is one map in particular, date 1737, which is in the CRO that is massive and crammed with detail. You need many visits and you can still find detail you have missed

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The old Chinese Maps of the world are interesting re detail and pre-date the understanding of sea exploration.

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