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Lauren

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Having been on site at Lockerbie, that was my immediate thought when seeing the aerial footage. The terrorist message made no mention of a missile; just that they had brought down the plane. 'Brought down' is a common enough euphemism in our language and has been used previously for bomb on board incidents but I wonder if the translation from the original lost some context.

The Lockerbie analysis is too close for comfort...dispersion of wreckage ad bodies. Oh please no!

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Having been on site at Lockerbie, that was my immediate thought when seeing the aerial footage. The terrorist message made no mention of a missile; just that they had brought down the plane. 'Brought down' is a common enough euphemism in our language and has been used previously for bomb on board incidents but I wonder if the translation from the original lost some context.

Were you on site that night? I took a delayed ferry to Ireland. It was a terrible night.

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Mainly Ryanair and Jet2 with no points, but have a nice rack up with Air France. Flying with their kid "HOP" for he first time in December...kind of like Lufthansa's Germanwings

If you're making that many flights, you could practically fly for free with BA if you had gained Avios with them. I know somebody who flies twice a month to Italy with BA and they have so much loyalty, they pay something like £20 return for flights in Club Europe.

Edited by Lauren

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Were you on site that night? I took a delayed ferry to Ireland. It was a terrible night.

Not that night but as soon as the press teams were allowed on site.

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The bit of the flight that looks odd is the end bit where it increases altitude just before dropping down, is that normal? I don't know the first thing about flying a plane, I have just been on them for holidays.

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It depends if it was still in the climb or not.

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A bomb is suspected of causing the Russian plane to crash after leaving the Egyptian tourist resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Russian aviation investigators confirmed the Airbus definitely broke up in mid-air before plummeting to the ground, killing 224 people – including 17 children.

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/russian-plane-crash-bomb-placed-6746924?ICID=FB_mirror_main

Edited by *Sub*Zero*

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Around 45 flights equivalent to 10% of departures have been cancelled from Heathrow due to the thick fog

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Bomb on board or missile strike. Airbus aircraft do not break up mid flight with no pilot advisory of a problem...

Unfortuntately it can happen,been cases of rapid decompression

Due to aircrft doors been blown out mid flight,on this occasion

i suspect an explosion downed the aircraft.

i started my career in the airline industry 22 years ago,and

unfortunately it is another sad day for the industry

my thoughts go out to all the victims and there families

C.S

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Just watching the BBC News, sounds like Russia have ruled out mechanical fault/failure and have said that it was an external influence that caused the Airbus to break up mid air.  

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Plenty of holdings into Manchester today due to the fog, in contrast it was 18'c and blue skies here all day. Even had the camera out watching the inbounds from the garden as they were circling around the Goyt.

 

post-8763-0-68857600-1446516912_thumb.jp

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Looking at pictures of the debris, it does look like there are puncture marks in the fuselage.

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I'd be very surprised if the A321 just broke up mid air due to some catastrophic failure in the airframe, it has been stated that the Airbus was in good health, passing all air worthiness tests etc... Doe anybody know how old the aircraft was? 

 

"Sudden and unexpected situation" recorded in cockpit in final moments of disaster in Sinai which killed 224 people

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/russia/11971577/Russian-plane-crash-cockpit-recordings-show-pilots-could-not-send-distress-signal-after-sudden-situation-latest-news.html

 

 

 

US satellite pic shows ‘heat flash’ indicating BOMB brought down Russian plane over Egypt

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/616032/ISIS-Russian-jet-Egypt-Terror-Monitor-jihadis-claim-responsibility

Edited by *Sub*Zero*

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Started off when I was 14 years of age when I joined the Air Training Corps, 195 Squadron at Grimsby. At the age of 16 years did my basic glider training over a period of about 6 weeks in a Slingsby Cadet Mark III and obtained my 'B' Cert after three solo flights.

 

I applied to join the RAF as aircrew attending the 3 day extended interview at RAF Hornchurch at 17 and a half years but was not selected, so joined the Met Office instead.

 

Time moved on, got married had children bought a house and for a long time the month was always too long for my pay cheque.

 

Later on had the odd flight, mainly in Pipers, gaining about 3 hours, then about 3 years ago decided to go back to flying in earnest. I started off with an hour in a flex wing micro light but that triangular bar was strange to me, not only that it bloody cold being exposed at 60 knots at 2,000 feet even in summer.

 

Had an hour in a 3 axis micro light, a Euro Star, that was a bit better but despite losing about 15 kilo in weight I was still 10  kilo overweight, so went to the London Gliding Club at Dunstable where I was just within the weight limit, wearing the parachute n' all.

 

Have now got back up to a reasonable standard of flying but after 4 or so hours in a powered aircraft forgot what the rudder is for! Not really needed so much once airborne they turn quite nicely just using the stick, so it was back to getting the stick and rudder co-ordination.

 

Also the glider, a K21 is a little bit more complicated than the Slingsby Cadet Mark III inasmuch as it has a trim and air brakes, which was another learning curve especially for landing where the stick and air brake have to used in a co-ordinated manner.

 

The other factor with Dunstable is that it is a series of ups and downs so you have to pick the spot where you land carefully, usually on an upslope when landing to the west.

 

Got to the stage now where I get complimented at times on the winch launches but aero tows, forget it - it calls for really precision flying and get too much out of the way it can be dangerous especially if you climb too quickly on the launch because that will lift the tail of the tug forcing it to point downwards to the ground... ooops.

 

Had a rest for the past 6 or 7 weeks 'cos we have been in France but whilst down here we took a week out on the Costa Brava at a smallish seaside resort, L'Estartit. There found a little flying club and asked for a flight.

 

The aircraft was an Aeroprakt 22, otherwise known as a Foxbat. It is a little 3 axis micro light with superb visibility out of the cockpit - very well behaved and easy to fly. 

 

Rotation at 65 kph and you are away. They are fitted with flaperons - being an old codger I had to look that up - in fact it is a combination of ailerons and flaps which explains why I could only see what I thought were the ailerons on the trailing edge of the wing.

 

Approach quite civilised, the flap has two positions and on the first reduce speed to 100 kph  and as you get closer to the ground select the second dropping speed to 80 kph.

 

The take off and landing runs are really short - need to be as the strip is only about 200 metres long. The instructor directed me to make a couple of passes along the runway at about 20 to 30 feet - had to be careful, the trees at the end and on my left were about 40 feet high and about 40 metres to the right of these was the club house.

 

On the third we brought it into land - I did wonder if we were going to run out of runway but it was no problem, we slowed nicely at the end so we were able to taxi to its parking spot.

 

What a lovely little aeroplane, I would love to have one but first I would have to learn to fly it properly, hangar it, maintain it and insure it - unfortunately my spare pennies don't run to that but I will be looking forward to further flights down there next year. In mean time plod on with the K21. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroprakt_A-22_Foxbat

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schleicher_ASK_21

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slingsby_Kirby_Cadet

Edited by mike Meehan

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^^^^

Excellent post Mike,thanks for sharing

C.S

Thanks for that CS - I must have missed this thread for a long time but now I have found it I will make use of it from time to time.

 

I should add that working on the principle that any landing you are able to walkaway from is a good landing, though once I did get three for the price of one! :)

 

Safe landings,

 

Mike

Edited by mike Meehan

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Unfortunately aviation in that part of the world is a complete liability. Central African based aircraft crash on a far to regular basis. Same for Indonesia. All Sudanese airlines are banned from flying in or to the EU because their safety is considered highly dangerous.

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A Russian-made aircraft has crashed in South Sudan shortly after take-off from Juba International Airport

 

http://news.sky.com/story/1581438/plane-crashes-near-south-sudan-airport

40 killed apparently,1 member of crew survives s,quite ironic

That these disasters normal come in three,s

C.S

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Flights from Egypt's Sharm el-Sheikh to the UK have been delayed amid concerns that the Russian jet was brought down by an "explosive device", Downing Street says.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34724604

 

Prime Minister David Cameron will chair a meeting of the Government's COBRA emergency committee on Wednesday evening to review the situation.

Edited by Summer Sun

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Either the government are being very presumptuous or they have intelligence the public do not. Technically, it's probably the safest time to fly to and from Sharm.

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Yeah just heard the news, all British flights to and from Sharm have been suspended amid fears it was a bomb which downed the Russian Airbus, but they said they cannot categorically say it was definitely a bomb at this stage. 

 

 

 

All flights between the UK and Sharm el-Sheikh have been suspended on Wednesday evening as UK experts assess security at the Egyptian airport

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34724604

Edited by *Sub*Zero*

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