Jump to content
Holidays
Local
Radar
Snow?
Lauren

Aviation Thread

Recommended Posts

I read this on the BBC news page and although a serious story, I ended up with the best laugh for ages when they quoted a witness called Reggie Bugmuncher.

Apologies to any Bugmunchers out there but I hope it was a stage name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got a little problem with the BA plane - no kidding!

 

People do stupid things in an emergency, they don't always think rationally. They could have costs lives. Idiots. Honestly, I would have majorly fined everyone who came off that bag with any sort of hefty overhead baggage. I can forgive purses as you tend to have these on your person, but getting those chunky cases out is dangerous.

 

Professionals handled the situation beautifully and it's when stuff like this happens that all that training comes in handy. It's often easy to forget how well trained aviation personnel are.

 

It reminds me of how people reacted on 9/11 when their building was hit, they took files and paperwork with them or finished their coffees before evacuating even though there was fire around them.

 

Sorry to be a pain, but could we stick this in the aviation thread in The Lounge?

Interesting article from the Guardian on this:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/sep/09/aeroplane-evacuations-why-people-grab-luggage-before-escaping

James Thompson from the BPS offers a useful explanation of the luggage phenomenon, but he doesn't mention the other ideas around this about the orderliness, familiarity and comfort of having our possessions with us. The Guardian reporter, Jacob Steinberg, describes how he was asleep before take off  and how you get complacent about anything like this ever happening when you fly a lot. He also asks that we don't criticise people who did take their luggage, as none of us knows how we would react in a situation like this as it is not necessarily rational thought at work.

 

I took part as a volunteer in emergency evacuation trials several years ago set up to try and improve evacuation techniques after the fatal aircraft fire at Manchester airport. Our "incentive" to get out as fast as possible was the chance to win £5. On one run, I received a lovely black eye courtesy of a deliberate elbowing from one of my fellow "passengers"! Makes you think...

Edited by Spikecollie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting article from the Guardian on this:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/sep/09/aeroplane-evacuations-why-people-grab-luggage-before-escaping

James Thompson from the BPS offers a useful explanation of the luggage phenomenon, but he doesn't mention the other ideas around this about the orderliness, familiarity and comfort of having our possessions with us. The Guardian reporter, Jacob Steinberg, describes how he was asleep before take off  and how you get complacent about anything like this ever happening when you fly a lot. He also asks that we don't criticise people who did take their luggage, as none of us knows how we would react in a situation like this as it is not necessarily rational thought at work.

 

I took part as a volunteer in emergency evacuation trials several years ago set up to try and improve evacuation techniques after the fatal aircraft fire at Manchester airport. Our "incentive" to get out as fast as possible was the chance to win £5. On one run, I received a lovely black eye courtesy of a deliberate elbowing from one of my fellow "passengers"! Makes you think...

 

They did that on the A380 testing. An aircraft should be fully evacuated in 90 seconds, but they were having trouble doing it. They threw in the incentive of the first 300 people off getting £10. Not only did they evacuate the entire aircraft in under 90 seconds, people ended up with black eyes and broken bones because people got so aggressive trying to get out.

 

People are strange, they'll get out for a tenner, but not for their lives.

 

It's like in some places they've started offering money incentives to lose weight and keep it off (about £500 I think). That has had far more success than people doing it for their own health and lives.

 

Humans are strange creatures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure whether this is the best place but an interesting piece for phobic flyers:

 

 
I'm not anxious about flying, I love it, but I do suffer from anxiety in other situations. This might help some folks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rescuers have discovered the black box all passengers on board are believed to be Russians

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy flying and have done quite a few long haul journeys across the Atlantic including as recently as last weekend but for some reason, I'm always happier when over land.

Obviously a stupid thought to carry because unless a controlled landing is possible, the chances of surviving varies little whatever surface lies below.

However tragedies such as this morning's certainly bring home the fact that an amount of risk is always there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@SkyNewsBreak

 

Update - Egyptian officials say there are no survivors from the crash of Russian airliner in Sinai - 224 people were on board

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy flying and have done quite a few long haul journeys across the Atlantic including as recently as last weekend but for some reason, I'm always happier when over land.

Obviously a stupid thought to carry because unless a controlled landing is possible, the chances of surviving varies little whatever surface lies below.

However tragedies such as this morning's certainly bring home the fact that an amount of risk is always there.

We have to keep perspective when things like this happen. It's a small airline company from a country with a very poor aviation safety record. Even Airbus can't help if you don't train your people properly and maintain your machines correctly...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a stall ,sounds odd cockpit struggle perhaps ???

 

Not neccessarily, mid-ir stalls are more common than you'd think. Air France over the Atlantic was a stall as is the Air Asia expected to be as well as several other crashes.

I enjoy flying and have done quite a few long haul journeys across the Atlantic including as recently as last weekend but for some reason, I'm always happier when over land.

Obviously a stupid thought to carry because unless a controlled landing is possible, the chances of surviving varies little whatever surface lies below.

However tragedies such as this morning's certainly bring home the fact that an amount of risk is always there.

 

I know, what you mean. I love flying, but I always breathe a sigh of relief when we've made it over a large stretch of water, because at least I know if we have to get down fast, there's a good chance of a runway somewhere on land.

 

We have to keep perspective when things like this happen. It's a small airline company from a country with a very poor aviation safety record. Even Airbus can't help if you don't train your people properly and maintain your machines correctly...

 

This is true. Indonesia is a good example of a country with many high profile crashes. All but a couple of airlines are banned from flying to the EU due to poor safety records. Same for many Russian airlines too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely tragic, 2014/2015 have been awful years for these air disasters. :(

A Russian airliner has crashed in central Sinai killing all 224 people on board, Egyptian officials have said.

The Airbus A-321 had just left the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, bound for the Russian city of St Petersburg.

Wreckage was found in the Hasana area and bodies removed, along with the plane's "black box". An official described a "tragic scene" with bodies of victims still strapped to seats.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-34687139?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_breaking&ns_source=twitter&ns_linkname=news_central

No wonder I suffer from anxiety from flying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely tragic, 2014/2015 have been awful years for these air disasters. :(

A Russian airliner has crashed in central Sinai killing all 224 people on board, Egyptian officials have said.

The Airbus A-321 had just left the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, bound for the Russian city of St Petersburg.

Wreckage was found in the Hasana area and bodies removed, along with the plane's "black box". An official described a "tragic scene" with bodies of victims still strapped to seats.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-34687139?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_breaking&ns_source=twitter&ns_linkname=news_central

No wonder I suffer from anxiety from flying.

As Simon Calder said this morning, anxiety is understandable when something like this happens, but as he also said, flying is getting safer all the time. But like the Germanwings crash in March, this is one of those accidents where you cannot help your mind wandering to the thought of what it must be like if you are still conscious in your seat and the aircraft is essentially just falling for however many seconds. It is an awful thought...but remember what I said earlier, this company and its country are aviation's third class citizens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. That's what happened with AirFrance447.

 

According to the flight data the aircraft was at about 40,000ft, which is at the very max of it's operating height fully loaded, so it's quite possible if they weren't careful.

 

Mixed stories coming through the news of the pilot declaring a technical issue and asking for an emergency landing, but these things usually come out early on even if they aren't true. Such claims were made about the Germanwings and Malaysian crashes.

 

A sudden rise in height and stall is also quite a common sight when an aircraft has had a sudden, catastrophic decompression which could be caused by a missile strike.

 

If it turns out IS downed this aircraft, the implications are very grave. Russia do not mess about, they will likely obliterate that part of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... I dread to think of the implications if the aircraft is proven to have been downed by a missile! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, Simon Calder is talking about terrorism now. He's concerned that all parties involved are being too hasty in blaming mechanical failure and that this haste may be an effort to cover up a terrorist scenario. I really do hope it's just an accident and not murder like MH17 in Ukraine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... I dread to think of the implications if the aircraft is proven to have been downed by a missile! 

 

One things for certain it won't be good for that area Russia do not mess about at all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One things for certain it won't be good for that area Russia do not mess about at all

What could they do, though, against IS if it was IS. They're a ragamuffin band of thinly dispersed loonies, not an army. Russia (surely) wouldn't use nuclear weapons in the area and obliterate everyone just to get rid of IS fighters - or would they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The IS statement does not say how militants downed the plane. Sinai Province has shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles (Manpads). However, security experts say that as the plane was flying at 31,000ft (9,450m), it would have been beyond the range of any Manpad missiles.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-34687309

 

â€@SkyNewsBreak

 

Update - Group linked to I.S. says it is responsible for #SinaiCrash - Russia's transport minister says claim "can't be considered accurate"

Edited by Summer Sun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be very surprised if there was a external influence which put the plane down, however it cannot be ruled out? I'm reading very distressing things on Reddit - not sure of its origin, of passengers bodies being found clutching onto surrounding grasses & that is the awful thing death was not instant many perished not instantly. The rescuers never got there in enough time & injuries were such catastrophic they had no chance. So sad.

Edited by Daniel*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...