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Lettucing Gutted

Supercell "Arctic" Thunderstorms

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I know we can easily get thunderstorms during polar and arctic outbreaks including the best, Thundersnow!  I have also read in my old weather books that severe thunderstorms occurred during the east US Blizzard Of January 1996 as well as the east US Blizzard Of March 1993.  I have also read the reports on Mr Data's threads about the cold spells of October 1922 and October 1926 which both mentioned severe thunderstorms occurring over parts of the UK during those cold spells.  But would such severe thunderstorms in Arctic air be actual supercells or just severe non-supercell thunderstorms such as squall lines or Mesoscale Convective Complexes or even just severe isolated non-supercell storms?

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I would think low topped supercells would be possible in a polar incursion bumping up against warmer European air in winter ..

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I know supercells can form along frontal zones but I am specifically talking about a supercell forming solely in Arctic or very cold polar air that becomes very unstable without any warm and humid tropical/subtropical/mid latitude air being involved.

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I know supercells can form along frontal zones but I am specifically talking about a supercell forming solely in Arctic or very cold polar air that becomes very unstable without any warm and humid tropical/subtropical/mid latitude air being involved.

what would the driver be for the instability ??.

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what would the driver be for the instability ??.

The instability would be driven by the sharp vertical temperature contrast between the deep very cold airmass and the warmer ice-free water or snow free land.  The instability would be further enhanced by the steep lapse rate created by the very cold upper level air.

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The instability would be driven by the sharp vertical temperature contrast between the deep very cold airmass and the warmer ice-free water or snow free land.  The instability would be further enhanced by the steep lapse rate created by the very cold upper level air.

And you'll need relatively low SLP, too..Otherwise it'll be that boring, miserable, flat stratus crap, with a few annoying snow-grains!

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We would be talking low level supercells as the tropopause is lower generally in colder climates, but it's an interesting thought ,perhaps some of the senior forcast team could add their thoughts !!.

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