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Cancer survivor’s film tribute to devotion of dying dog

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When a photographer from Oregon was diagnosed with cancer, his dog, Denali, lay for long days on his hospital bed, amid the tubes and cords. “He never took his eyes off me,†Ben Moon said yesterday. He recovered from cancer and man and dog continued their travels up and down the western states of America, climbing, surfing and shooting spreads for magazines.

 

Then Denali was diagnosed with cancer. “He was there for me while I went through my struggle with that,†said Mr Moon. “Being there for him seemed like the only thing to do.â€

 

This is one man's deeply touching tribute to his four-legged best friend.

 

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/oregon-man-films-emotional-tribute-late-dog-article-1.2254424

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Dogs are truer friends that humans but sadly they do not have our lifespan, so if we keep dogs we have to be prepared to have our hearts broken from time to time.

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And Cats for that matter, My Boarder Terrier goes everywhere with me to i dread the thought...

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My boy's 14 and a half now and has dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer (the latter seems off the radar right now and hasn't progressed). He's still enjoying life and we're happy together. He knows no different from when he was much younger and he still wants to play very vigorously - then has to sit down and not know why he can't.

 

I'm OK about letting go, although it hurts horribly. I just wish humans had the same easy option when they get to the "no fun" stage in illness...

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My boy's 14 and a half now and has dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer (the latter seems off the radar right now and hasn't progressed). He's still enjoying life and we're happy together. He knows no different from when he was much younger and he still wants to play very vigorously - then has to sit down and not know why he can't.

 

I'm OK about letting go, although it hurts horribly. I just wish humans had the same easy option when they get to the "no fun" stage in illness...

I've have basal-cell carcinoma; my daughter's hand malignant melanoma and my ex-wife has had clear-cell stuff. So I know how you feel, believe me. But a fourteen-year-old? That cannae be right! :cc_confused:  :cc_confused:

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My girl Meg is a 13 1/2yr old German Shepherd, she has arthritis in her legs mainly her back ones

Yesterday she was diagnosed with vestibular disease, it's quite frightening to watch her staggering and falling

over, at first before diagnosis I thought that was it, I was going to have to make that awful decision.

Her loyalty is second to none, she even tried to struggle up the stairs last night, I had to run down to catch her, she  wanted to be with me. I am providing supportive care, i.e hand feeding taking out to toilet etc she's always been by my side if I was ill, I can only return the loyalty. I am hoping she makes a recovery

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My girl Meg is a 13 1/2yr old German Shepherd, she has arthritis in her legs mainly her back ones

Yesterday she was diagnosed with vestibular disease, it's quite frightening to watch her staggering and falling

over, at first before diagnosis I thought that was it, I was going to have to make that awful decision.

Her loyalty is second to none, she even tried to struggle up the stairs last night, I had to run down to catch her, she  wanted to be with me. I am providing supportive care, i.e hand feeding taking out to toilet etc she's always been by my side if I was ill, I can only return the loyalty. I am hoping she makes a recovery

I hate to say this, but while you might well (hopefully) be dealing with "old dog" vestibular disease, as it's called - you may not. My previous dog was only 7 and she started with these symptoms. She was given a steroid injection and was back to her old self the next day (now I know that this was very odd). Anyway she had a really bad bout with nystagmus (eye flicking) and was completely unable to move. The vet suggested we might be dealing with a brain tumour, but the fact that it resolved again with steroids puzzled us all. During her final attack, she was paralysed and her brain stem was affected, so we had her euthanised at home, We found out that it wasn't a tumour, but a condition called granulomatous meningio encephalomyelitis (GME) a nasty autoimmune disease which results in the brain being attacked by the body's own immune system. That's why the steroids helped for a while, but every time we weaned them down the nystagmus would come back first and then other symptoms. 7 is the typical age for GME, so your pup is unlikely to have that - but do keep an eye out for other symptoms - caught early, even a tumour can be stalled to give you a lot more time together. I hope Meg is all good soon...

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I hate to say this, but while you might well (hopefully) be dealing with "old dog" vestibular disease, as it's called - you may not. My previous dog was only 7 and she started with these symptoms. She was given a steroid injection and was back to her old self the next day (now I know that this was very odd). Anyway she had a really bad bout with nystagmus (eye flicking) and was completely unable to move. The vet suggested we might be dealing with a brain tumour, but the fact that it resolved again with steroids puzzled us all. During her final attack, she was paralysed and her brain stem was affected, so we had her euthanised at home, We found out that it wasn't a tumour, but a condition called granulomatous meningio encephalomyeltitis (GME) a nasty autoimmune disease which results in the brain being attacked by the body's own immune system. That's why the steroids helped for a while, but every time we weaned them down the nystagmus would come back first and then other symptoms. 7 is the typical age for GME, so your pup is unlikely to have that - but do keep an eye out for other symptoms - caught early, even a tumour can be stalled to give you a lot more time together. I hope Meg is all good soon...

Thanks for the warning. I am watching her like a hawk, she seems a bit brighter and is taking a bit of food now but still stumbling all over the place like a drunken sailor. Lots of supportive care and TLC at the moment, fingers crossed

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Thanks for the warning. I am watching her like a hawk, she seems a bit brighter and is taking a bit of food now but still stumbling all over the place like a drunken sailor. Lots of supportive care and TLC at the moment, fingers crossed

One of my best friends has Ménière's disease - which is a vestibular disease. If she is in the dark trying to move around upright, she gets very disoriented and has vertigo. The dizziness can bring on a panic attack in some people, which makes things even worse. The same may apply to dogs - keep the lights on. Meg might also feel happier when all four paws are on the ground - it helps proprioception, so cuddles on the floor, and keep her off the stairs.

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One of my best friends has Ménière's disease - which is a vestibular disease. If she is in the dark trying to move around upright, she gets very disoriented and has vertigo. The dizziness can bring on a panic attack in some people, which makes things even worse. The same may apply to dogs - keep the lights on. Meg might also feel happier when all four paws are on the ground - it helps proprioception, so cuddles on the floor, and keep her off the stairs.

Yep I am doing all of the above, lamp on of a night, I am sleeping on the sofa near her too

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