Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
nick sussex

EU Referendum

Recommended Posts

12 hours ago, Snowycat said:

Without any doubt I'm definitely voting to come out.  Interestingly amongst family, friends and work colleagues I've yet to speak to anyone who is voting to stay in the EU- there is only one colleague sitting on the fence and quite openly she's that is because her husband is a farmer.   Our local newspaper undertook a poll and the result was a massive thumbs down to staying in the EU

This is down to the Birmingham area being one of the, if not the, strongest Eurosceptic areas in the country. If you went outside of Birmingham to other parts of the country you'd be surprised at the divergence of views in comparison. It does follow the 'rules' though, as in general Birmingham follows the working class model for those wanting to leave the EU. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too be honest Im not not aware of a single person who wants to stay in Europe. Everyone I know if they vote is voting out.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, The PIT said:

Too be honest Im not not aware of a single person who wants to stay in Europe. Everyone I know if they vote is voting out.

I would be very surprised if this was the case. No one knows for sure who is going to vote what. At this stage what people say they are going to do and what they actually and up doing are two different things. Besides I know the voting intentions of 5 people or so.. I don't go around asking every one what they will be voting . I can only assume the same for most others

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, davehsug said:

I meant the Channel 4 reporter lol almost thumped by the outie knuckle dragger! I couldn't care less what happens to Bozo, as long as he's never let anywhere near real power!

Oh for gods sake, almost thumped!? :rofl:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, The PIT said:

Too be honest Im not not aware of a single person who wants to stay in Europe. Everyone I know if they vote is voting out.

Likewise, everyone I know either doesn't care or wants out.

I expect the masses of 'in' votes in London and Scotland will sway the vote though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand where I work I don't think there is a single person who is planning to vote out, same again in my household. Swings and roundabouts and before anyone says anything I am in one of the most eurosceptic regions of the UK (East Anglia).

I think it really depends on background and the field you work in. Industries which benefit greatly from interaction within the EU are tending to strongly back the remain side and vice versa on the whole.

Edited by Captain Shortwave
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Captain Shortwave said:

On the other hand where I work I don't think there is a single person who is planning to vote out, same again in my household. Swings and roundabouts and before anyone says anything I am in one of the most eurosceptic regions of the UK (East Anglia).

I think it really depends on background and the field you work in. Industries which benefit greatly from interaction within the EU are tending to strongly back the remain side and vice versa on the whole.

As with any opportunity to change, those people with most to lose are most likely to resist. I always think that these things get tied in to individual's happiness (or lack of it) resulting from the outcome of their life choices. People who have buggered up their life tend to want to 'lash out' and disrupt the status quo - messing things up for those who they see as successful I guess.

It's why the relentless rise of house prices and low interest rates are so important. The (ludicrous) perception people have of personal success based on the value of their home is a trump card for the Remain campaign. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't suggest much passion over the sovereignty issue nor immigration if £1.92 a week can swing the result to this from 50/50.

More house prices and the like as you say @Dougal.

 

Edited by scottish skier
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, scottish skier said:

Doesn't suggest much passion over the sovereignty issue nor immigration if £1.92 a week can swing the result to this from 50/50.

More house prices and the like as you say @Dougal.

 

Not looking good for 'Leave' is it? I would've expected a close race up until the vote then a strong result for 'Remain' when the pub talk evaporates in the sober atmosphere of the polling station as happened in Scottish indyref 1.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dougal said:

As with any opportunity to change, those people with most to lose are most likely to resist. I always think that these things get tied in to individual's happiness (or lack of it) resulting from the outcome of their life choices. People who have buggered up their life tend to want to 'lash out' and disrupt the status quo - messing things up for those who they see as successful I guess.

It's why the relentless rise of house prices and low interest rates are so important. The (ludicrous) perception people have of personal success based on the value of their home is a trump card for the Remain campaign. 

So Mr successful you see 50% of the electorate as unhappy losers then.  That snobbish attitude fits in so perfectly with the remain camp.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, kent said:

So Mr successful you see 50% of the electorate as unhappy losers then.  That snobbish attitude fits in so perfectly with the remain camp.

Yes, that's exactly what I was saying. Thanks for summing it up for me.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry but you got burnt Kent. You have to see the funny side of that.. if only to lighten the mood a bit :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, The PIT said:

Too be honest Im not not aware of a single person who wants to stay in Europe. Everyone I know if they vote is voting out.

Just the same as in the last GE when UKIP supporters claimed that everyone they knew was voting UKIP. It didn't pan out that way. Similarly, everybody I know wanted the Tories out, but somebody voted for them!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, SP1986 said:

Sorry but you got burnt Kent. You have to see the funny side of that.. if only to lighten the mood a bit :-)

No funny side at all he condemned himself as a snob and as for your earlier post as knowing the voting intentions of 5 people you really should get out more and increase your circle of friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are two distinct types of 'loser' IMO: those of us that, due to a million and one circumstances, both within and outwith our control, will never be among the top echelons - 1% is 1% after all; and then there are those who are so driven by their sense of 'failure' that they devote their entire lives looking for someone-else to blame...ATM, the EU is the scapegoat of choice?

As far as I'm concerned, blaming immigrants, Muslims, pinkos, lefties, bankers et. al., will not make my Asperger's disappear. And neither will a Brexit!:D

Edited by Ed Stone
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the topic of 'everyone I know thinks like this'...

I'll just chuck this in again.

Quote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False-consensus_effect

In psychology, the false-consensus effect or false-consensus bias is an attributional type of cognitive bias whereby a person tends to overestimate the extent to which his opinions, beliefs, preferences, values, and habits are normal and typical of those of others (i.e., that others also think the same way that they do).[1] This cognitive bias tends to lead to the perception of a consensus that does not exist, a "false consensus".

This false consensus is significant because it increases self-esteem (Overconfidence effect). It is derived from a desire to conform and be liked by others in a social environment. This bias is especially prevalent in group settings where one thinks the collective opinion of their own group matches that of the larger population. Since the members of a group reach a consensus and rarely encounter those who dispute it, they tend to believe that everybody thinks the same way. The false-consensus effect is not restricted to cases where people believe that their values are shared by the majority, but it still manifests as an overestimate of the extent of their belief...

The vast majority of people I know voted Yes in the Scottish iref. However, I was quite aware that their views were not those of the population as a whole and as a result, I didn't expect Yes to win, just hoped it might cross the line.

It's dangerous to fall prey to the false consensus effect; makes losing much harder to accept. 

Edited by scottish skier
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, scottish skier said:

On the topic of 'everyone I know thinks like this'...

I'll just chuck this in again.

The vast majority of people I know voted Yes in the Scottish iref. However, I was quite aware that their views were not those of the population as a whole and as a result, I didn't expect Yes to win, just hoped it might cross the line.

It's dangerous to fall prey to the false consensus effect; makes losing much harder to accept. 

Spot on. Everybody I know is voting to remain because it will help imports of foie gras and truffles. But that's just the circles I move in. Apparently.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, davehsug said:

Just the same as in the last GE when UKIP supporters claimed that everyone they knew was voting UKIP. It didn't pan out that way. Similarly, everybody I know wanted the Tories out, but somebody voted for them!

UKIP have nothing to do my group of friends. I wish you and ED would drop your obsession with them.

There was an interesting discussion on BBC news. I was interested to hear they reckoned a low turn out would favor the out brigade. I would have thought it favor the in campaign as people couldn't be bothered to change the status qou

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, kent said:

No funny side at all he condemned himself as a snob and as for your earlier post as knowing the voting intentions of 5 people you really should get out more and increase your circle of friends.

Kent you seem to be in here quite a lot .. I would suggest perhaps you follow your own point and "get out more" as you put it.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for voting.. the way I see it is that those voting leave have nothing in their life that they are worried about risking. If they have something that relies on EU membership then in general you wouldn't vote leave unless extremely fool hardy. Those who feel they have something directly to lose from leaving EU will vote to remain. 

 

Edited by SP1986

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, scottish skier said:

On the topic of 'everyone I know thinks like this'...

I'll just chuck this in again.

The vast majority of people I know voted Yes in the Scottish iref. However, I was quite aware that their views were not those of the population as a whole and as a result, I didn't expect Yes to win, just hoped it might cross the line.

It's dangerous to fall prey to the false consensus effect; makes losing much harder to accept. 

Yes, it was such a shame the yes vote for an independent Scotland lost out.  Nothing personal as I have Scottish relatives but a great deal of us did hope the yes vote would prevail.....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SP1986 said:

As for voting.. the way I see it is that those voting leave have nothing in their life that they are worried about risking. If they have something that relies on EU membership then in general you wouldn't vote leave unless extremely fool hardy. Those who feel they have something directly to lose from leaving EU will vote to remain. 

 

On the other hand those voting to leave see it as an opportunity  to expand the uk and control over its own destiny. While those who wish to stay are afraid of change

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Snowycat said:

Yes, it was such a shame the yes vote for an independent Scotland lost out.  Nothing personal as I have Scottish relatives but a great deal of us did hope the yes vote would prevail.....

Sure, about 30% of English people living in Scotland voted Yes, which was really nice too. Shows how it wasn't personal as you say.

This is why I'm not on either side in the EUref in terms of how England votes, although I back Scotland remaining in.

Edited by scottish skier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, The PIT said:

On the other hand those voting to leave see it as an opportunity  to expand the uk and control over its own destiny. While those who wish to stay are afraid of change

Just a quickie, PIT - how exactly do you plan to 'expand the UK'? Get Boris to blow hot air into it!:D

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Lockdown Gardening - Top Tips for New Gardeners

    Lockdown Gardening - Top Tips for New Gardeners - Blog by Jenny Bell WWW.NETWEATHER.TV In the first in a regular series of gardening articles, Jenny Bell gives her top tips for new gardeners who are maybe taking their first gardening steps during the lockdown.  

    Netweather forecasts
    Netweather forecasts
    Latest weather updates from Netweather

    Warm Sunny Days Before A More Unsettled & Cooler Easter Weekend

    High pressure in charge next few days will bring warm sunshine for many, but from Good Friday and through the Easter Weekend it will turn cooler and more unsettled with showers. Read the full update here

    Netweather forecasts
    Netweather forecasts
    Latest weather updates from Netweather
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...