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knocker

Unsung heroines: Six women denied scientific glory

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Emmy Noether did not lack the respect of her peers. Albert Einstein wrote in her obituary for the New York Times in 1935 that "In the judgment of the most competent living mathematicians, Fräulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began." Yet Noether suffered discrimination throughout her career because of her gender – and died in exile on grounds of her faith. Her most seminal work, the discovery of a deep connection between symmetries in nature and the form of fundamental physical laws, is 100 years old this year, and yet even among physicists is not nearly as famous as it should be. Hers

 

http://www.newscientist.com/gallery/unsung-heroines?utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=SOC&utm_campaign=hoot&cmpid=SOC%257CNSNS%257C2015-GLOBAL-hoot

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Rosalind Franklin always springs to mind when I think about women who should have been acknowledged but weren't. She was instrumental in the discovery of DNA for which Crick and Watson got the Nobel prize, but she failed even to get a mention.

I Think also Caroline Herschel, the sister of William Herschel the astronomer, pretty much did all his calculations on which he gained his scientific reputation. She also was the first woman to discover a comet.

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