Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Snowyowl9

Another major plane crash.

Recommended Posts

does anyone know what the weather is like currently over that region? I know the alps / mountainous regions can cause violent up draughts or something? ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

conditions not looking that great for the search team in the area... :(... Pray I Pray that there are some survivors ....please please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weather was fine. Aircraft was making a descent at a slightly higher than average rate, but not alarming and it was consistent. That is all we know. Anything else is speculation. I does frustrate me to see people who know f-all about aviation suddenly becoming experts and speculating all over the place across the internet.

May they rest in peace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weather was fine. Aircraft was making a descent at a slightly higher than average rate, but not alarming and it was consistent. That is all we know. Anything else is speculation. I does frustrate me to see people who know f-all about aviation suddenly becoming experts and speculating all over the place across the internet.

May they rest in peace.

 

Yep know what you mean Lauren. Just seen on information it had descended etc. Peeps always speculate on all sorts of incidents and become experts in many fields - I work in transport and everyone is a transport engineer.

 

My heart goes out to all those affected, including the search team who have a horrendous task ahead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly some kind of mechanical or electrical issue must have caused the plane to descend rapidly from hits 38,000 cruising height. Only the black box will confirm whether the pilots could have done something to save it.

 

It is an old plane, 1991.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do the pilots manage to crash plane into Alps? When my plane going home from Malta last year it is pretty high up and nowhere near to the ground over the Alps. I feel sad for the people died in the crash. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unusual though that, yet again, there appears to have been no contact from the crew of the aircraft to air traffic control indicating they had a problem. That's when it apparently took 8 minutes from the start of it's unscheduled descent to the point of the crash. The only 'good' thing is that they know where this one is and have already recovered the data recorders so maybe we'll get an answer this time.

 

Oh, and although an aircraft  produced in 1991 is probably fairly 'old', I'd not say it was unusually old to still be flying, even for a 'Western' airline. There will be many aircraft of that vintage still flying in commercial service, and many much older.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a large runway at barcellonette ,I wonder if it was trying to land there ??...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly some kind of mechanical or electrical issue must have caused the plane to descend rapidly from hits 38,000 cruising height. Only the black box will confirm whether the pilots could have done something to save it.

 

It is an old plane, 1991.

 

It wasn't really a rapid descent. A rapid emergency descent after cabin depressurisation would have been almost double that. Was maybe a little bit steeper than normal, but certainly not a rapid descent. But obviously, yes, they were either descending because of some sort of problem or they may have had no choice over their descent.

 

How do the pilots manage to crash plane into Alps? When my plane going home from Malta last year it is pretty high up and nowhere near to the ground over the Alps. I feel sad for the people died in the crash. :(

 

Well I would hazard a guess, that they didn't mean to..... You'd only be flying that low in a jet over the Alps if you were coming into land at one of the airports in the region in the course of a normal flight.

 

Unusual though that, yet again, there appears to have been no contact from the crew of the aircraft to air traffic control indicating they had a problem. That's when it apparently took 8 minutes from the start of it's unscheduled descent to the point of the crash. The only 'good' thing is that they know where this one is and have already recovered the data recorders so maybe we'll get an answer this time.

 

Oh, and although an aircraft  produced in 1991 is probably fairly 'old', I'd not say it was unusually old to still be flying, even for a 'Western' airline. There will be many aircraft of that vintage still flying in commercial service, and many much older.

 

The rule of flying in an emergency is 'Aviate, Navigate, Communicate' ie, you focus first on keeping the aircraft under control, then you think about navigating to safety and finally you would then communicate the problem. Considering most fatal aircrashes are sudden and catastrophic, all focus would be on aviating and navigating often leaving no or little time to communicate.

 

1991 is quite old, but certainly not the oldest out there. Plus Germanwings had a great record in terms of keeping older planes up to date, stripping them back and replacing parts, so technically it was very unlikely to actually be 24 years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a large runway at barcellonette ,I wonder if it was trying to land there ??...

 

The runway at Barcalonette is tiny, way too small for an A320. Nice, Barcelona were nearby and would be the obvious diversion choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Navigation errors and the like,seems like more of this is happening.

Had a plane crash near here 3 or so years ago for no apparent reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, they're not. Aircraft accidents are becoming less and less. We just have more media now, so it seems like more. They are also becoming more survivable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a stat today that an A320 takes off or lands every 2.5 seconds. Puts it into context just how rare these crashes are.

 

Air travel remains by far and away the safest form of travel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a stat today that an A320 takes off or lands every 2.5 seconds. Puts it into context just how rare these crashes are.

 

Air travel remains by far and away the safest form of travel.

Yes the facts say one thing unfortunately it means zip to people who hate flying like me. I'd rather take my chances on the ferry, train, car all of which are much less safe!

 

On top of the will I get a suicidal pilot, will the engines fail, will I get hit by lightning or hit a mountain, one now has to deal with terrorism so all in all for people like me I'd rather do anything than get on a plane. Strangely I used to love flying but woke up one day and thought what am I doing! I admit its totally irrational !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It wouldn't normally start descending over southern France if it was going to Dusseldorf surely? Much too far away. 6000 feet is way too low around the Alps. Sounds like some kind of mechanical or navigation fault if it was at that height.

Re more air crashes, I don't think there are more, but there seem to have been a lot involving big planes in the last 4-5 years. I still think it's weird that the Malaysian plane that ended up in the Indian Ocean flew exactly the route to Beijing, flipped by 180 degrees. Something went wrong with its compass, like when birds migrate in the wrong direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The runway at Barcalonette is tiny, way too small for an A320. Nice, Barcelona were nearby and would be the obvious diversion choices.

Nice airport is literally half in the sea, would not be easy to land there with a plane that's playing up.

Girona? You could land a pretty big plane there, and it's closer than Barcelona.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It wouldn't normally start descending over southern France if it was going to Dusseldorf surely? Much too far away. 6000 feet is way too low around the Alps. Sounds like some kind of mechanical or navigation fault if it was at that height.

Re more air crashes, I don't think there are more, but there seem to have been a lot involving big planes in the last 4-5 years. I still think it's weird that the Malaysian plane that ended up in the Indian Ocean flew exactly the route to Beijing, flipped by 180 degrees. Something went wrong with its compass, like when birds migrate in the wrong direction.

 

I think sadly with MH370, we're looking at someone who knew what they were doing flying the aircraft until fuel exhaustion. The chances of all the things happening that they did, in the order they happened and it just being a series of unfortunate events is less likely than intentional pilot sabotage. I mean it could be just an accident, but in this case I think it's an Occam's Razor.

 

Nice airport is literally half in the sea, would not be easy to land there with a plane that's playing up.

Girona? You could land a pretty big plane there, and it's closer than Barcelona.

 

Maybe. We don't know what their planned airport diverts were, but I'd hazard a guess, seeing as it made no turn after the descent started that within a few minutes they were either incapacitated or had zero flight controls, but even then it's possible to turn an aircraft with engine power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Barcellonette is only 800 m I ve read you need about 1500 m min to land a 320 ,Cannes is just about long enough ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the descent characteristics there appears to be two comments now I have seen which says the rate was unusual and by supposed flight safety experts. Of course the credibility of these cant be certain and the flight box will hopefully give done answers. So terribly tragic and inconceviably devastating for all the poor families and friends whatever happened. Rest in peace . My prayers are for you.

Posted at 18:29

Aviation expert Dr Steven Wright told BBC Radio 4 that as well as examining the flight recorders, investigators will want to look through the maintenance records for the aircraft.

"For an aircraft to lose 32,000ft in eight minutes is really, really unusual," he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A jet aircraft would typically have a normal descent rate of about 2000-3000ft/min. To lose 32000ft in 8 minutes would be an average descent of 4000ft/minute. In fact on certain approaches this can be a normal rate. So that's a bit steeper than normal, but not out of the realms of possibility. Put it this way when an aircraft makes a controlled emergency descent you would perhaps typically expect about double this rate, give or take.

But it's a moot point really, just pointing out that rate of dexcent is hardly a nosedive or massively unusual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

There are loads of airports in Southern France which the crew could have used for an emergency landing, it is still early days yet but it appears that little was put out in the way of a distress message - it reminds me of the Airbus 330 AF 447 which crashed in the Atlantic when its pitot tube froze up - they are all supposed to have been modified since then but it is noted that this aircraft was 19 years old, which is not necessarily old for a well maintained airliner but until the information is gathered from the 'black boxes', really orange, the cause is going to be speculation. The descent rate from 38,000 feet to approx. 6000 feet would be about 45 mph but no telling what the forward speed was at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...