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knocker

Road names and their origins

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A furore has broken out in the quite village of Mevagissey at the proposed reinstatement of the name of a popular walk to 'Hitlers Walk' The Jewish community are up in arms for one but the village appears to be split on the subject, I'll post a link to the story but it does introduce the interesting subject of road and house names in areas and that can in many cases tell you quite a bit of the history of the area if you dig around. For instance around here there are quite few names linking to South Africa which is direct reflection on the huge number of miners who went to South Africa at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th. The Cornish economy depended almost entirely on their income.

 

Do others live in areas where road and house names are useful pointers to the past? The Mevagissey case is actually a rather odd example.

 

Cornish town embroiled in row over plan to rename beauty spot 'Hitler's Walk'

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/11389521/Cornish-town-embroiled-in-row-over-plan-to-rename-beauty-spot-Hitlers-Walk.html

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In this case i think its probably wrong, although the origin is amusing enough.

Theres alot of history (and by default our heritage) hidden in road/street names. My roads boring though and must be the commonest in the uk! Lol. But in derby we have 'blagreaves lane' and 'lousy greaves lane', both refer to burrial sites of the black death. Many use blagreaves lane (as in black graves) without ever knowing its grisly past.

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There's a road near my parents' house which is called Gowkhouse Road. The word gowk means a stupid person, or a fool so the Gowkhouse would have been for the mentally challenged or insane. The institution is long gone, but the road name remains.

 

I used to live on a road called "The Butts", but never worked out where the road name came from.

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There was an iron mine just south of Dalton-in-Furness called Woodbine (Dicky Pink's) iron mine. That the one?

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There was an iron mine just south of Dalton-in-Furness called Woodbine (Dicky Pink's) iron mine. That the one?

yes indeed ,this area is littered with mines , are you familiar with the area ?..

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Been through Dumb Woman's Lane around Rye area? derived from the following extract: Dumb Woman's Lane used to be used by smugglers. Smuggling was the biggest industry there once upon a time. A cartload was coming up the lane, this woman looked out of her window and saw it, so they cut her tongue out.

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yes indeed ,this area is littered with mines , are you familiar with the area ?..

 

No but I'm quite interested in mining so just had a quick look on probably the best mining website.

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No but I'm quite interested in mining so just had a quick look on probably the best mining website.

my fathers family came up from Redruth in Cornwall to work the iron ore mines !....

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I have some friends who live in Haydock quite close to a road called Slag Lane.

I imagine its more to do with local mining that local women but either way I wouldn't fancy it as part of my address.

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my fathers family came up from Redruth in Cornwall to work the iron ore mines !....

 

That's interesting, when roughly would that have been? Although the main diaspora of Cornish miners was overseas many did go to mainly hard rock mines all over Britain. The son of a local mine captain went to Canada via copper mining in the Shetland Isles

 

There must be thousands of street names in the UK associated with the local mining industry.

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That's interesting, when roughly would that have been? Although the main diaspora of Cornish miners was overseas many did go to mainly hard rock mines all over Britain. The son of a local mine captain went to Canada via copper mining in the Shetland Isles

 

I think around 1900 to roose near barrow in furness ..

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The Cornish mining industry was in it's death throes by then. Most of the income in the county in the following years came from South Africa and many local miners would have been looking for work.

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My locale was the first to be bombed in the Blitz, many street names derive from Docklands at its former glory, when trading was blooming for hundreds of years. My area once specialised on timber there is a great photo displaying it all alight. Hence just up the road from me is Timber Pond Road, 250 acres were set alight by incendiary bombs in September 1940.

Initially the main targets were the gasworks at Beckton, the Royal Arsenal factory at Woolwich and the docks. These were easy to locate, as the German pilots simply had to follow the river until they reached their targets. However, thousands of bombs rained down on the surrounding densely packed streets of East and South East London. At the Surrey Docks 250 acres of timber were set alight by incendiary bombs. North of the river warehouses full of sugar, rum, paint and spirits caught fire. Blazing rivers of molten liquid poured out onto the quaysides and onto the water.

- See more at: http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/collections-research/research/docklands-war-port-and-east-during-second-world-war/docklands-war-blitz/#sthash.Vobiv8u8.dpuf

post-19153-0-06824400-1423780252_thumb.j

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The Cornish mining industry was in it's death throes by then. Most of the income in the county in the following years came from South Africa and many local miners would have been looking for work.

funny that ,there is family connections to South africa !!..

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An area north of Hailsham has such street names as Harebeating Lane/Road/Crescent. In Domesday, there was a hamlet there recorded as herb ettings. Perhaps the six inhabitants then were early vegetarians.

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Lot's of roads around here are named after Charles Dickens stuff such as characters, place names, books etc. Medieval, Kings, Mountains and Saxon names are quite common around here too. The obvious connection is Charles Dickens lived around here and the area is steeped in Medieval and Saxon history. 

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The small rough cart track which runs to my house then becomes very overgrown and un-passable used to be the old through road (then horse & cart..) from Derby to Manchester. You would never of thought it to look at, And in winter it must of horrendous.

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