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Parking on Pavements

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There is debate at present on banning the parking of vehicles on pavements across the UK, currently this has already been in place in London for the last 40 years.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30740630

 

Living where I do I see it everyday, but then the old roads and terraced houses here mean the limited parking is at a premium.

 

Should it be banned outright or should a compromise be found?

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Unenforceable I can see a lot of blocked roads as well. Might as well have a law saying no drive way no car.

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I always thought it was banned anyway! I think selfish gits who block the entire pavement should be penalised. But sometimes it's unavoidable to park partially on the pavement.

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I always thought it was banned anyway! I think selfish gits who block the entire pavement should be penalised. But sometimes it's unavoidable to park partially on the pavement.

Well I know of plenty of places in Sheffield if they parked in the road and not on the pavement the road would be blocked. They have no drive ways and there isn't a way they can have one either. I think they should be a law that if you have a drive way you should use it though.

Edited by The PIT

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The main Mosque in Birmingham at the weekend it's a free for all, Pavements, grass verges, even on the traffic island thats outside the Mosque it's self

the Mosque is big with a tiny car-park how the hell it got planning i have know idea, anyway you don't ever see a parking officer........... he or she would have a field day

 

If this "banning the parking of vehicles on pavements across the UK" comes in, it's for one and all.

Edited by Dancerwithwings

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The main Mosque in Birmingham the weekend it's free for all, Pavements, grass verges, even on the traffic island thats outside the Mosque it's self, the Mosque is big with a tiny car-park how the hell it got planning i have know idea, anyway you don't ever see a parking officer........... he or she would have a feild day

 

If this "banning the parking of vehicles on pavements across the UK" comes in, it's for one and all.

This has been brought up in Sheffield when a main road gets almost blocked as they also double park. The council refuses to take action for reasons unknown.

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Same round here on a Sunday, two churches in close proximity together in an area already difficult to park in at any other time (narrow back roads, limited parking), come Sunday it is nothing but bedlam.  But for locals I am with them, it is difficult, and they are normally quite good and will park up on the pavement one side but they leave the other side clear to walk along.

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A lot of it comes down to common sense but when you see cars parked up with absolute no consideration for others these IMO need to be dealt with, but where do you draw the line.

Edited by Dancerwithwings

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A lot of it comes down to common sense but when you see cars parked up with absolute no consideration for others these IMO need to be dealt with, but where do you draw the line.

On the pavement presumably lol

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There is debate at present on banning the parking of vehicles on pavements across the UK, currently this has already been in place in London for the last 40 years.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30740630

 

Living where I do I see it everyday, but then the old roads and terraced houses here mean the limited parking is at a premium.

 

Should it be banned outright or should a compromise be found?

There are times when pavement parking is safer than leaving a car totally on the road, a law doesn't legislate for every single road and conditions. Unfortunately commonsense seems to be going out of fashion fast with our mothering state!   

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As far as I am aware the old offences relating to obstruction of and wilful obstruction the highway still exists an d the highway is defined as going from hedge to hedge or premises boundary to premises boundary so this would include the pavements.

However when this was enacted modern life as we have it today was never envisaged so this laŵ is rarely used and designated no waiting areas controlled by traffic wardens evolved.

It is worth noting that in a street which does not have controlled traffic areas nobody has any more right than anybody else to park so you do not have an automatic right to park outside your house.

By the manner in which you park it is still quite likely that you could commit an offence for which you could be summonsed, particularly as mentioned above where you double park - further than that if such a person refused to move such a parked vehicle on being no asked by a constable, he could be arrested for wilful obstruction of the highway.

This laŵ doe not apply just to motor vehicles but for any manner of obstruction, for instance the street trader who gathers a crowd around him preventing others from free access could also be guilty.

The bottom line is that we all have to live under these circumstances so it is a question of using your loaf and having consideration for others.

On the other hand the parking in side streets does have its benefits as well because the width of the road being restricted causes the traffic to travel that much slower so the incidents of more serious accidents decreases.

Edited by mike Meehan
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As far as I am aware the old offences relating to obstruction of and wilful obstruction the highway still exists an d the highway is defined as going from hedge to hedge or premises boundary to premises boundary so this would include the pavements.

However when this was enacted modern life as we have it today was never envisaged so this laŵ is rarely used and designated no waiting areas controlled by traffic wardens evolved.

It is worth noting that in a street which does not have controlled traffic areas nobody has any more right than anybody else to park so you do not have an automatic right to park outside your house.

By the manner in which you park it is still quite likely that you could commit an offence for which you could be summonsed, particularly as mentioned above where you double park - further than that if such a person refused to move such a parked vehicle on being no asked by a constable, he could be arrested for wilful obstruction of the highway.

This laŵ doe not apply just to motor vehicles but for any manner of obstruction, for instance the street trader who gathers a crowd around him preventing others from free access could also be guilty.

The bottom line is that we all have to live under these circumstances so it is a question of using your loaf and having consideration for others.

On the other hand the parking in side streets does have its benefits as well because the width of the road being restricted causes the traffic to travel that much slower so the incidents of more serious accidents decreases.

Hello Mike,

As a matter of interest does the law apply equally to police vehicles parking on the pavement or on double yellow lines to go and purchase a newspaper from the local paper shop or only in emergency situations.

 

Also I would appreciate your observations with relation to traffic lights. what is the situation if I am stationary at traffic lights and I am waiting for them to change from red when an emergency vehicles with sirens sounding arrives behind me? Am I permitted to cross the white line to allow the vehicle access or do I have to wait for the lights to change. The reason I ask this is that two or three years ago I read an article where someone was prosecuted in such a situation when they made way for an ambulance and as they lost points and had to pay a fine they also suffered an increase in their next insurance premium as a result. It all seemed incredulous to me and wondered at the time if it was newspaper hype.

 

Kind Regards

 

Dave

Edited by claret047

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Here in Exeter the blanket law would probably be impractical because there are many tightly-packed Victorian style housing estates where many houses don't have driveways or garages and the only suitable place for parking is on the streets.

 

I am not a fan of encouraging on-street parking.  I have a similar objection to this as with most chicanes and "aggressive" speed bumps- they turn streets into obstacle courses for road users and make it tricky for me, as a pedestrian, to find a good spot to see where traffic is coming from when crossing the road.  They may make it statistically safer due to the reduced traffic speeds and thus reduced speed of impact, but at a cost.  However, in some parts of Exeter I genuinely can't see a viable alternative to allowing people to park their cars on the streets- there isn't enough space elsewhere.

 

However, a blanket ban on parking such that a car blocks more than half of the pavement would probably be both a positive step and a practical one.

Edited by Thundery wintry showers

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I don't have any problem with it as long as wheelchairs and pushchairs can get past. Some places around here if you didn't park on the pavement, emergency vehicles can't get past.

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Aye, I realised that my previous post could potentially have been answered with, "Why don't people park on the streets, but stay entirely off the pavements, then?"  I forgot to mention that some of Exeter's housing estates (particularly the Victorian ones) have such narrow roads that if people parked entirely on the roads, emergency vehicles would have no hope of getting through.  Thus, in those cases, cars parking partly on the pavement is the lesser of two evils.

Edited by Thundery wintry showers

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Like mike said the current law on obstruction  never had modern life in in mind, a blanket ban would be IMHO utterly stupid, a reasonable and justified approach maybe needed but a UK wide law that "must fit all" is just not practical.

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Like mike said the current law on obstruction  never had modern life in in mind, a blanket ban would be IMHO utterly stupid, a reasonable and justified approach maybe needed but a UK wide law that "must fit all" is just not practical.

It all comes down to coppers screwing their loaves and drivers having a little common sense and consideration for others. :)

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And parking on grass verges,what a mess some have become around here ,not just cars but trucks leaving foot deep troughs!!..

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Aye, I realised that my previous post could potentially have been answered with, "Why don't people park on the streets, but stay entirely off the pavements, then?"  I forgot to mention that some of Exeter's housing estates (particularly the Victorian ones) have such narrow roads that if people parked entirely on the roads, emergency vehicles would have no hope of getting through.  Thus, in those cases, cars parking partly on the pavement is the lesser of two evils.

Yeah, it's a consequence of the ever increasing size of the cars on our roads. Compare the 1960's original Mini with its modern BMW equivalent, likewise with the Fiat 500. Or even an early 90's Vauxhall Vectra to a modern Insignia. For example, a MK1 VW Golf is 1.5 feet shorter and 6 inches narrower than it's modern equivalent MK7. So not only are fewer cars taking up the same length of road as they were 20/30/40 years ago, but they are also sticking out into it more, with modern cars parked on both sides of the road taking up an extra foot of road width, or more - often the difference between just squeezing through or outright blocking the road.

With cars set to get increasingly bigger to accommodate safety features and mod cons, you've got to wonder how long the current laws surrounding parking can continue.

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Hello Mike,

As a matter of interest does the law apply equally to police vehicles parking on the pavement or on double yellow lines to go and purchase a newspaper from the local paper shop or only in emergency situations.

 

Also I would appreciate your observations with relation to traffic lights. what is the situation if I am stationary at traffic lights and I am waiting for them to change from red when an emergency vehicles with sirens sounding arrives behind me? Am I permitted to cross the white line to allow the vehicle access or do I have to wait for the lights to change. The reason I ask this is that two or three years ago I read an article where someone was prosecuted in such a situation when they made way for an ambulance and as they lost points and had to pay a fine they also suffered an increase in their next insurance premium as a result. It all seemed incredulous to me and wondered at the time if it was newspaper hype.

 

Kind Regards

 

Dave

Pretty sure you have to wait for the lights to change legally.

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