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Bárðarbunga and Askja - Volcanic Activity


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http://volcams.malinpebbles.com/pubweb/Iceland.htm

 

On the Bardarbunga2 cam (The cam that moves) You can maximize this image and it gives quite good quality. Halfway across each pan, it stops and a caption 'Preset 1' appears at the bottom right of the image. If you look in the centre of the image at this point, there seems to be quite a bit of steam coming out of the ground over quite a wide area.

Edited by Alby Back
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I am still trying to understand what is happening here but there does seem to be a little confusing information going on. Before I express any thoughts, understand that I am not a volcanologist and th

Did you see the beautiful picture with the eruption glow and northern lights giving surreal lighting effects.   The eruption seen from Jökulsarlón south of Vatnajökull glacier.  (Martin Schultz,

This is my favourite (from elsewhere) to date - very atmospheric.  

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http://volcams.malinpebbles.com/pubweb/Iceland.htm

 

On the Bardarbunga2 cam (The cam that moves) You can maximize this image and it gives quite good quality. Halfway across each pan, it stops in the centre and a caption 'Preset 1' appears at the bottom right of the image. If you look in the centre of the image at this point, there seems to be quite a bit of steam coming out of the ground over quite a wide area.

That is dust Alby Back,this has been mistaken quiet a few times over the past week.

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Before getting too carried away the amount of vapor visible from fumaroles is also linked to the humidity in the air.

The important things are

 

1) Has the temperature changed of the fumeroles

2) Has the gas content increased co2 and so2 for example.

 

If those increase that's a good indication of a coming eruption.. Even then Magma may stay below ground.

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Before getting too carried away the amount of vapor visible from fumaroles is also linked to the humidity in the air.

The important things are

 

1) Has the temperature changed of the fumeroles

2) Has the gas content increased co2 and so2 for example.

 

If those increase that's a good indication of a coming eruption.. Even then Magma may stay below ground.

Not getting carried away PIT,but those look like steam/smoke vents to me and not evaporation,

 

is there any links to where we can find these temp readings from?.

Edited by Allseasons-si
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Not getting carried away PIT,but those look like steam/smoke vents to me and not evaporation,

 

is there any links to where we can find these temp readings from?.

 

The locals who post on the Volcanocafe website say that the steam is a normal occurrence for that area - hot springs location.

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Interesting how most of the Activity seems to be at night.  What's the moon phase at the moment?

 

The articles posted here yesterday provided some excellent reading last evening, especially when talking of the possible interaction between the (probably) basaltic dyke magma and the cooloing Rhyolite in the Askja system.  We have to hope that it doesn't go bang (even if we'd secretly want it too) a nice flow lava would do me, huge amounts of ash due to Rhyolite degassing I don't want to think about

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There is a young girl near Askja studying at the moment, her pictures are very good. https://twitter.com/fencingtobba/media

 

http://www.vedur.is/skjalftar-og-eldgos/jardskjalftar/myvatn/ looking at this I guess Askja is being invaded by magma, I can not say weather it will erupt or not, but the chance is there alright.

Edited by Rustynailer
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Courtesy of Evgenia Ilyinskaya @EIlyinskaya

Iceland-bred volcanologist based at the British Geological Survey.
 
This PDF on the entire system is essential reading.
 
 
Also, another 3D Link showing timeline of quakes.
 
Edited by lorenzo
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Quote from Magnus Tumi Gudmundsson, professor of geophysics at the University of Iceland.

 

http://www.ruv.is/frett/seismic-activity-near-the-askja-caldera

 

 

This is a very interesting sequence of events; big news really in a geological context, even though an eruption has´nt happened yet, and hopefully will not happen. We are looking at the active rift between the plate boundaries in the middle of the country, where much of the volcanic activity has taken place. This particular area has been relatively quiet in recent decades; an intense episode like this has probably not happened for the last hundred years, perhaps not even two hundred years.“

 

....and funnily enough, the sun hasn't been this quiet in a hundred years - 200 years, if you go by Leif Svalgaard's new SSN proposals,

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Quote from Magnus Tumi Gudmundsson, professor of geophysics at the University of Iceland.

 

http://www.ruv.is/frett/seismic-activity-near-the-askja-caldera

 

 

....and funnily enough, the sun hasn't been this quiet in a hundred years - 200 years, if you go by Leif Svalgaard's new SSN proposals,

It's not been this quiet at Solar Max for that long, admittedly, but it was much quieter in 2009, when there were 260 days without sunspots. Has anyone yet come up with a credible link between solar activity and tectonic activity on Earth?

Edited by Crepuscular Ray
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don't take too much notice of the steam there will always be steam in Iceland due to its geothermal nature after all its the natural steam that the icelandics use to power there country they harness the geothermal energy through it and turn it into electricity at steam turbine plants so it is entirely normal here especially with the latent heat under the ground and this doesn't mean an eruption.

 

also the streams looking a bit more full you have to remember its still summer up there and they are still seeing snow melt etc so it could very well be this and if there was something significant happening that would look more like a raging torrent 20-100ft deep so a little extra water means nothing for a sign of an eruption you would be looking for a massive outflow from the glacier.

Edited by Buriedundersnow
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It's not been this quiet at Solar Max for that long, admittedly, but it was much quieter in 2009, when there were 260 days without sunspots. Has anyone yet come up with a credible link between solar activity and tectonic activity on Earth?

All I have found is No, only speculation. I think there is a link :gathering: , science argues against this on the Internet and it can get quite heated like the Global warming, sorry the climate change thing....., that's why I don't believe 100% in science, the theory's and peer reviewing, they keep proving themselves wrong every few tens of years. Then say oh yes that guy we warned off the subject was right afterall.

Don't get me wrong I am all for science, but I go for instinct and fate aswell. Imagination is a great thing, on the internet it can be hard to imagine sometimes.

 

Back to Bada, just wait and see, she is not done yet,  Regarding Askja the Bada fissure with its magma has been flowing in the officially marked area of Askja's fissures for at least 2 days now it is already there, we will know it if it hits a pocket of the wrong kind of rock alright. Time marches on by weekend I think we will know one way or the other, stop or go.

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Take a look at this article from the Daily Express:

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/502349/Iceland-ash-cloud-could-trigger-freezing-cold-winter-this-year-if-it-erupts

 

Its telling about what would happen if Bárðarbunga did erupt. It says :

BRITAIN could freeze in YEARS of super-cold winters and miserable summers if the Bardarbunga volcano erupts, experts have warned. Edited by pip22
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Todays details from the Icelandic met office & Duty Geologist

 

27th August 2014 11:50 - from of the Scientific Advisory Board

Scientists from the Icelandic Meteorological Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences, together with representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland, met today to discuss the on-going unrest at the Bárðarbunga volcano.

Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board:
  • Intense seismicity continues. Over 700 earthquakes have been recorded since midnight. Earthquakes are occurring mostly beyond the edge of the Dyngjujökull glacier and the intrusion itself has migrated about 1 km northwards since yesterday.
  • At 00:16 UTC today, a magnitude 5.3 earthquake occurred in the caldera of Bárðarbunga. At 02:50 UTC, another similar-sized earthquake (magnitude 5.2) took place in the same region.
  • At 01:52 UTC, a magnitude 4.5 earthquake was detected on the eastern side of the Askja volcano. This was followed by a few micro-earthquakes in the same area.
  • The dyke intrusion beneath Dyngjujökull is thought to be about 40 km in length.
  • Modelling of GPS data indicates that about 20 million cubic metres of magma have been added to the volume of the intrusion in the last 24 hours.
  • Modelling results suggest that the dyke intrusion is causing stress changes over a large area, including the region to the north of the dyke's extent; this could account for the increased seismicity at Askja volcano.
  • There are no indications that the intensity of the activity declining.
  • From today, the afternoon status report will no longer be produced. However, if the situation escalates (i.e. imminent signs of an eruption), daily status reports will be reintroduced. The results of the scientific advisory board will continue to be distributed daily at around midday.
From the Icelandic Met Office:

The Aviation Colour Code remains at the ‘orange' level for Bárðarbunga.

27th August 2014 06:30 - from geoscientist on duty

The night started with a 5.3 event in Bardarbunga at 00:16 hours.

Around half an hour later activity around the tip of the dyke started increasing and reached some kind of "high" around 2 o'clock and has continued at that level since with many events of magnitude 2-3.

Just before 2 o'clock there was a magnitude 4.5 event just east of the Askja caldera. Few microearthquakes have been measured there earlier this week.

At 02:50 there was a 5.2 event again in Bardarbunga.

Total events automatically detected from midnight until now are 500, most of them around the tip
of the northward migrating dyke.

Implications of Askja event is still premature to speculate on. However, we are watching the area closely.

There seems to be a slight increase in activity compared to same time. The >M5 events in Bardarbunga are still interpreted as being relaxation process of the caldera due to magma pressure changes and the propagating dyke.

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It's not been this quiet at Solar Max for that long, admittedly, but it was much quieter in 2009, when there were 260 days without sunspots. Has anyone yet come up with a credible link between solar activity and tectonic activity on Earth?

 

Just briefly, in view of John's comment. Studies disagree - some saying more at maximum and others saying more at minimum. Looking at the periodicities in the Icelandic record, it is a good match for the grand minimums . Perhaps, like weather, it is a regional effect on the plates.

 

http://phisica.homescript.ru/14_e.pdf

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Well the dike may reach Askjar tomorrow morning. Interesting that there hasn't been any big quakes for a while which in theory could indicate the magma isn't able to break any rocks or it's following fractures quiet easily. It's probably only a matter of time before there's some more bigger shocks again. The fun may start if it reaches Askjar.

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