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Bárðarbunga and Askja - Volcanic Activity


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Posted
  • Location: @scotlandwx
  • Weather Preferences: Crystal Clear High Pressure & Blue Skies
  • Location: @scotlandwx

    By popular demand a new thread for monitoring of Bárðarbunga following the outbreak of activity which began c.15 August.

     
    Bvqm45GIgAEuj2d.jpg

     

    Useful Links

     

    Main Volcanic Activity Thread - http://forum.netweather.tv/topic/62309-general-volcanic-activity-thread/

     

    Iceland Met Office

     

    Earthquakes -       http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes

    Scientific Updates - http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/articles/nr/2947

    Seismometer Map - http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/englishweb/tremor.html

    Tremor Plots -         http://hraun.vedur.is/ja/oroi/allarsort.html

     

    3D Earthquake Activity - http://baering.github.io/

    USGS Monitoring - http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/?source=sitenav

     

    Bárðarbunga cam 1 - http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga

    Bárðarbunga cam 2 - http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga-2/

    Kverkfjoll cam -          http://vedur2.mogt.is/kverkfjoll/webcam/index.php

     

    Some further images including an example image from the baering.github link of the plot, you can also rotate the plot via clicking, holding down then dragging it. Vertical view is good of Dyngju­jök­ull activity.

     

    BvgtAAfIcAAX1Dt.png Plot.PNG
     

     

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    I am still trying to understand what is happening here but there does seem to be a little confusing information going on. Before I express any thoughts, understand that I am not a volcanologist and th

    Did you see the beautiful picture with the eruption glow and northern lights giving surreal lighting effects.   The eruption seen from Jökulsarlón south of Vatnajökull glacier.  (Martin Schultz,

    This is my favourite (from elsewhere) to date - very atmospheric.  

    Posted Images

    Posted
  • Location: @scotlandwx
  • Weather Preferences: Crystal Clear High Pressure & Blue Skies
  • Location: @scotlandwx

    Cheers :)

     

    A good round up of this week / weekend events here http://www.mbl.is/frettir/knippi/3305/ Including the vid linked below.

     

    Tremors and activity now in Dyngju­jök­ull - which if you are reading is pronounced like below.

    post-7292-0-13032800-1408903441_thumb.pn

     

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    Posted
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: dry sunny average summers and really cold snowy winters
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level

    its still very interesting that we are seeing the northward motion of the quakes towards ASKJA as we progress and the main core moving out from under the glacier now this could be a good thing if we are looking for this to progress in a more timely fashion than a more slower progression as with the main activity moving clear of the glacier if we could see the ground open where there is no ice above it then it could melt the glacier then aiding the rupturing of the ground currently under the glacier with the removal of what is undoubtedly helping to keep the ground stable with the added weight and pressure on the surface in these areas.

     

    I am not sure how long in length fissure eruptions can be maybe someone with a bit more knowledge can tell me but I would assume it can go quite a large distance dependant on the scale of how much of the fissure is destabalized also worth noting which could make this eruption worse is it seems to be in the line of area where we would see flood water from the glacier now if the fissure was to open in this area then the added water from glacial melt would interact with the magma and create a more explosive eruption which could add to the strain on the fissure itself and could well cause a larger area to open as would be the case with no water interaction.

     

    this is going to be a very interesting watch and could well fade away with nothing but it also has the scope to turn into something pretty big and that would be a worry not only for Iceland and airlines but for us also as with fissure eruptions a lot of the poisonous gases that will come from the eruption would stay at the surface instead of being ejected to great height similar to the LAKI and this could be really dangerous if it floats around as this stuff could burn your lungs if inhaled and can even burn or melt your skin on contact as well and if we look at the fact LAKI killed over 1 million people in the 1700's things could get really messy here and one eye kept on the weather forecasts might also be a good idea incase things do take a worse case scenario type of situation.

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    Posted
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl

     

    By popular demand a new thread for monitoring of Bárðarbunga following the outbreak of activity which began c.15 August

     

     

    pinned as requested.

     

    Thanks Lorenzo/J10

     

    Now we have a dedicated thread, the activity will no doubt drop off and it will end up being a damp squib.  In some respects that may not be a bad thing.  As fascinating as it is to behold the destructive power of our planet, the geological history of this volcano suggests it may have the potential to deliver disruptive and widespread consequences.

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    Posted
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl
  • Location: Exeter, Devon, UK. alt 10m asl

    I am not sure how long in length fissure eruptions can be maybe someone with a bit more knowledge can tell me but I would assume it can go quite a large distance dependant on the scale of how much of the fissure is destabalized also worth noting which could make this eruption worse is it seems to be in the line of area where we would see flood water from the glacier now if the fissure was to open in this area then the added water from glacial melt would interact with the magma and create a more explosive eruption which could add to the strain on the fissure itself and could well cause a larger area to open as would be the case with no water interaction.

     

    this is going to be a very interesting watch and could well fade away with nothing but it also has the scope to turn into something pretty big and that would be a worry not only for Iceland and airlines but for us also as with fissure eruptions a lot of the poisonous gases that will come from the eruption would stay at the surface instead of being ejected to great height similar to the LAKI and this could be really dangerous if it floats around as this stuff could burn your lungs if inhaled and can even burn or melt your skin on contact as well and if we look at the fact LAKI killed over 1 million people in the 1700's things could get really messy here and one eye kept on the weather forecasts might also be a good idea incase things do take a worse case scenario type of situation.

     

    I'm most certainly not someone that would be classed as knowledgeable on such things but a scan of the internet states the Laki system is around 25km in length so I guess that may be a useful guide.

     

    http://www.vatnajokulsthjodgardur.is/english/destinations/laki/

     

    http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/oldroot/volcanoes/volc_images/europe_west_asia/laki.html

     

    As you say, anything approaching the scale of the Laki 1783 eruption would be something of immensely serious concern, but such events are thankfully rare.

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    Posted
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: dry sunny average summers and really cold snowy winters
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level

    Earthquakes Tsunamis â€@NewEarthquake 46s

    5.3 earthquake, 108km WNW of Hofn, Iceland. Aug 24 20:39 at epicenter (18m ago, depth 6km). http://j.mp/XKqd9t

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    Posted
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: dry sunny average summers and really cold snowy winters
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level

    Gisli Olafsson â€@gislio 1m

    Two leading scientists say there may be links between the #Bardarbunga and #Askja systems given current events

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    Posted
  • Location: Lowestoft, Suffolk
  • Location: Lowestoft, Suffolk

    Right, I'm a newbie at this volcano marlarkey, and am following the github site. Is the increase in quakes over 2.0 a sign of impending eruption or is it just the magma moving and not a precursor to something big? Because there's been a plethora of 2.0+'s on the site and they seem to be coming more rapidly.

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    Posted
  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)
  • Weather Preferences: severe storms,snow wind and ice
  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)
    Posted
  • Location: Pant, Shropshire
  • Weather Preferences: Cold and snow, atlantic storms, hot sun and thunderstorms
  • Location: Pant, Shropshire

    Right, I'm a newbie at this volcano marlarkey, and am following the github site. Is the increase in quakes over 2.0 a sign of impending eruption or is it just the magma moving and not a precursor to something big? Because there's been a plethora of 2.0+'s on the site and they seem to be coming more rapidly.

    It seems to me that it could mean both just to give an awkward answer.  Its a while since I studied volcanology, groundwater is my specialist field in geology but having read the excellent article Allseasons-si gave the link to its coming back.  At the moment it seems that the M2.0s are indicative of magma moving, it is the direction of movement that is most interesting at present.  It seems the thought is that the link could be made with the Askia system and in essence the longer the M2.0s go on without any eruption the larger the eruption might be.  The M4 - 5 tremors are also interesting as they are indicative of caldera subsidence within the Bardabunga volcano.  Its all very interesting stuff at the moment.  I abandoned a trip with the land rover to this part of Iceland a few years ago, this area having long fascinated me, shame I didn't make it as much of it may be about to change over the next few months!

     

    M

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    Posted
  • Location: Harrow (Fulwood), London, (Sheffield)
  • Location: Harrow (Fulwood), London, (Sheffield)

    Right, I'm a newbie at this volcano marlarkey, and am following the github site. Is the increase in quakes over 2.0 a sign of impending eruption or is it just the magma moving and not a precursor to something big? Because there's been a plethora of 2.0+'s on the site and they seem to be coming more rapidly.

     

    I'm nowhere near an expert on volcanoes but from what i can remember from one of my uni modules the injection of magma into the surrounding rock induces earthquakes through changes in pressure. Increased seismic activity is one of the main forecasting tools for predicting volcanic eruptions. Lots of volcanic activity, with increasing strength, is generally indicative that an eruption is likely to take place. As this volcano is sublglacial a large eruption is likely to inject a lot of ash into the atmosphere (e.g. like the 2010 eruption).

    Edited by Mark Bayley
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    Posted
  • Location: west croydon (near lombard)
  • Location: west croydon (near lombard)

    http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/articles/nr/2949

    Where this ends up remains to be seen

    The interest is still whether baraobunga either erupts

    Or collapses which im thinking the latter looks more likely

    The question re the smaller quakes

    The smaller quakes mean less resistant where magma movement is concerned

    Bear in my iceland has a lot of smaller quakes to relating to plate movement

    The bigger quakes at the ones to keep watching. Especially the shallower ones as this is where

    Pressure is more likely to be relesed and also ice quakes do happen too

    All in all keep watching

    Best bet follow the mo updates but keep watching the earthquake monitors as these are

    Instant ,i would say follow the cams but thats if you can get on them

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    Posted
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: dry sunny average summers and really cold snowy winters
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level

    Dave McGarvie â€@subglacial 16m

    #Bárðarbunga. The dyke is growing NNE nicely. Context: some fissures in Iceland are c.100 km long, and some Greenland dykes are 400 km long.

     

    it doesn't say about this fissure but gives an idea of top end of what we may see.

     

    I think 100 km would be top here I don't know why its talking about Greenland.

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    Posted
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level
  • Weather Preferences: dry sunny average summers and really cold snowy winters
  • Location: falkirk, scotland, 16.505m, 54.151ft above sea level

    Dave McGarvie @subglacial  Â·  36m

    #Bárðarbunga There's an old basalt fissure eruption (Holuhraun) just NNE of new dyke. If new dyke meets old dyke, maybe the surface beckons?

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    Posted
  • Location: Aldborough, North Norfolk
  • Location: Aldborough, North Norfolk

    Doesn't look as though much has changed overnight.  Still plenty of quakes and a number over M3 in the dyke, but most reasonably deep.

     

    Number of quakes in the last 48 hours is really high almost 2,400 a few minutes ago (08:00 BST).

     

    Looks as thought the caldera is settling a bit as the magma moves Northeast, I'm still amazed by the workings of tectonics and the volumes spoken of.

     

    As far as a possible eruption is concerned, even the experts aren't sure, so we just wait and see.

     

    Thanks to all the knowledgable people that have contributed here (I'm thinking of JP and others) making is a very useful place to come to find latest details

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    Posted
  • Location: west croydon (near lombard)
  • Location: west croydon (near lombard)

    Thanks norfolk

    I'm away at present so my main computer with all my full links for info I don't have. Plenty of good updates being put up here by others though (thanks) the askja link is v interesting and hopefully won't happen as won't be good. As you say still as we were at present

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