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Think the problem she faces is all the treatments left are experimental, the ZMapp one has all been used up.

Which is another reason why once has to be careful. Incubation period is 2 to 21 days and they are not infectious until showing symptoms. Since she was already feeling unwell she must have been infectious during the flight or was very likely to be. The next question should care nurses go into quarantine for 22 days as a precaution? 

I hope she recovers and the case in Swindon is false alarm.

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If this is potentially that serious of a threat, would it not be sensible to ban all air travel to and from the infected areas, with those arriving back into Europe etc being quarantined for the durat

Droplets can become airborne due to being expelled at pressure - think the nature of the symptoms! - this then leads to fomite transmission. Rigorous hand hygiene and avoiding touching ones face are t

An interesting spot of info I learnt when looking after family members who all came down with a nasty virus a few years ago was - always put the toilet seat down after someone's been ill or otherwise,

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Not looking good for her once you go critical with Ebola it is touch and go, I sincerely hope she pulls through.

A new patient displaying symptoms of the deadly Ebola virus is being rushed to hospital as doctors say the Scottish nurse already suffering from the disease has worsened and is now in a critical condition.

Hospital officials said the unnamed new patient was being transferred to hospital in Swindon by specialist ambulance team after being taken ill after returning from West Africa.

The patient, from South Gloucestershire, will undergo tests at the hospital and if necessary be transferred to the specialist quarantine unit in London where nurse Pauline Cafferkey is already being treated.

A spokesman for the Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said: "Any suspected patients will be tested for a variety of things. If there was a confirmed Ebola case, they would be transferred to London."

The local ambulance service said the patient was being transferred by its hazardous area response team. A spokeswoman said: "That patient has recently returned from West Africa and has made complaints of feeling unwell."

Further cause for concern

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/ebola/11323277/Ebola-in-the-UK-New-suspected-case-in-South-Gloucestershire-as-Scottish-nurse-worsens.html

As the saying goes "when it rains it pours"

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South Gloucestershire??!!

That's here!

On a serious point - why aren't these people being quarantined for 3 to 4 weeks on their return?

I suspect the problem is probably logistical when considering the number of flights there must be per day arriving into the UK from West Africa - it appears that it takes time for the symptoms to develop and as the tests are showing there is no immediate or sure way to differentiate between the healthy and the sick travellers, air travel being so quick these days.

 

The only thing I can suggest is that we have health officials at the points of departure to determine those who have realistically been at risk of contracting the disease and if necessary subjecting those considered to be in the risk group to quarantined before being allowed to proceed with their journey. I believe it would work better that way because the locals should have better knowledge of the current conditions.

 

Incidentally the word 'quarantine' is derived from the French for 'quarante' (40) - in the days of yore, if there was sickness on board a ship entering harbour, the crew on board were prevented from landing and confined to the ship, which was anchored a little way out, for a period of this 40 days to allow the disease to run its course without imperilling the health of those ashore.

Edited by mike Meehan
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Mike I think Bristol Boy is referring to high risk groups who have been in regular contact such as care workers. It would seem a common sense thing to do

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Mike I think Bristol Boy is referring to high risk groups who have been in regular contact such as care workers. It would seem a common sense thing to do

In that case it would make sense to me with people who are high risk, as I said, to delay their flight until such time as it can be ascertained whether they are infected or not but we cannot always tell whether people are high risk or not - obviously medical and other staff who have been dealing with it directly are but there must be countless other people who also wish to travel, some of whom may have been in a high risk area and others not. 

 

It seems to me that the main screening should be set up before departure, initially by straight forward question and answer, then progress to medical examinations if this does not give a clear result, graduating to quarantine where there is a likelihood of the person being infected.

 

Overall it appears to me that the best chance we have of containing the disease is to confine it and reduce the chances of it spreading further afield. For the funds and medical expertise required in all this, it is a world problem so the world will have to assist.

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Incubation period of 2 to 21 days and considering we don't have the drugs this would be the correct way to approach things. 25 days then full check up. In theory zero chance of spreading it. Should be done on the camps but how good are the procedures there. Clearly they slipped up somewhere.

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Mike I think Bristol Boy is referring to high risk groups who have been in regular contact such as care workers. It would seem a common sense thing to do

Absolutely Pit.

The returning care/health workers should be isolated for 3 to 4 weeks and kept under observation.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

UK nurse Pauline Cafferkey is no longer critically ill with Ebola, London's Royal Free Hospital says.

In a statement, the hospital said she was "showing signs of improvement".

Ms Cafferkey, from Glasgow, was diagnosed with Ebola in December after returning from Sierra Leone. It was announced she was in a critical condition on 4 January.

The 39-year-old had volunteered with other UK NHS staff for the charity Save the Children in West Africa.

The full statement from the hospital said: "The Royal Free Hospital is pleased to announce that Pauline Cafferkey is showing signs of improvement and is no longer critically ill.

"She remains in isolation as she receives specialist care for the Ebola virus."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30783537

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Doctors test woman for Ebola at Northampton General Hospital

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30825231

 

 

A woman suspected of having Ebola is being treated at Northampton General Hospital (NGH).

A spokesman for the hospital told the Press Association: "I can confirm that we have a suspected case of Ebola. It is a female adult.

"She will be in isolation if she is suspected of having the illness."

The hospital has not released any further details but it is understood the woman had recently travelled abroad.

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  • 3 weeks later...

New Ebola cases show first 'rise in 2015'

The number of new Ebola cases has increased for the first time in 2015 in all three affected countries, the WHO's latest weekly figures show,

There were 124 new confirmed cases in the week to 1 February - 39 in Guinea, five in Liberia and 80 in Sierra Leone.

Not good coinciding with the start of the wet season, viruses love damp dim environments in the harsh sun they are eradicated quickly, I see the outbreak to escalate im the coming months.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Further to a comment I made much earlier in the thread regarding the wests delayed response.

 

Many scientists. campaigners and aid workers are quick to point out that the global reaction to Ebola - and the indecent haste

to manufacture a vaccine - says much about the way in which the West's health priorities trump those in developing countries.

 

According to the WHO there are at least 20 diseases that take an inexorable toll on developing nations, particularly in Africa. Unlike Ebola, there is no discernible political momentum to devise a vaccine for most of them. They include leishmaniasis, which occurs in 98 countries and causes 40,000 deaths a year; elephantiasis which has left 40 million disfigured or incapacitated; and Chagas disease which is endemic to Latin America and kills more people in the region each year than any other parasite-born disease, including malaria.

 

The point is not to in any way downplay the seriousness of Ebola, or the way in which it has ravaged Guinea, Sierra Leone and

Liberia, and its potential to wreck havoc beyond West Africa. But why, a cynic might ask, has such impetus developed in the wake of a very small number of deaths in the US and Europe?

 

Why indeed.

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  • 7 months later...

Pauline Cafferkey is in A 'Serious Condition' with an "unusual late complication" from the infection she was transferred from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow to the Royal Free London hospital this morning in a military aircraft under supervision.

 

http://news.sky.com/story/1566472/ebola-nurse-is-in-a-serious-condition

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If the virus has reactivated after lying dormant for a while, is there a possibility that it may have mutated in that time? Don't know anything about this sort of thing but if antibodies had defeated the original infection, how can it re-emerge in the same form in the presence of the same antibodies??

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There's another really grim set of articles that I was reading in my break today about how and where the virus hides. An American victim was found to have it in the vitreous of his eye, and it seems it also hides away in the prostate, testes and joints. A very crafty old virus, but not unlike the malaria type pathogens which aren't viruses or bacteria but protozoan parasites which can also hide away, recede and then flare up when the immune system is not looking. Yuck though...

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Pauline Cafferkey is in A 'Serious Condition' with an "unusual late complication" from the infection she was transferred from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow to the Royal Free London hospital this morning in a military aircraft under supervision.

 

http://news.sky.com/story/1566472/ebola-nurse-is-in-a-serious-condition

 

Let's hope it's not like chicken pox / shingles, whereby when a person's immune system weakens, for whatever reason, the blighter flares up again. Worrying for any past sufferers of this abominable disease.

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Let's hope it's not like chicken pox / shingles, whereby when a person's immune system weakens, for whatever reason, the blighter flares up again. Worrying for any past sufferers of this abominable disease.

But that is exactly how viruses behave, Steve. I do hope she recovers! :cray:  :cray:  :cray:

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  • 1 year later...

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