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Posted
  • Location: approx 3mls from coast Liverpool North West England & Andalusia
  • Weather Preferences: Any extreme weather conditions
  • Location: approx 3mls from coast Liverpool North West England & Andalusia

    I have recently bought a Renault Megan Scenic 1.4 Dynamique , and up to now I am getting bad vibes off more knowledgeable folk ie mechanics, car sales people etc. It will need a cambelt change in 5000 miles and have been told this is an expensive job, I was also told today that I should watch the electrics as Renaults are notorious for faults, and to sell it on quickly, starting to worry now have I made a bad choice

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    Posted
  • Location: Mostly Watford but 3 months of the year at Capestang 34310, France
  • Weather Preferences: Continental type climate with lots of sunshine with occasional storm
  • Location: Mostly Watford but 3 months of the year at Capestang 34310, France

    I had a Clio a few years ago - the wiring loom went, probably after about 4 or 5 years, something which I was given to understand was installed for life but not withstanding that I was charged getting on for £1000 to get a new one installed.

    Next I was having my car serviced and the people collecting it damaged a garden wall - the driver admitted it was his fault at the time, so I put in a claim to them - they flatly denied any liability and obviously the driver changed his tune completely by the time he returned to the garage.

    I was really p'eed off about this and changed to a Toyota shortly afterwards - I've had my current car for almost 7 years now - haven't had too much wrong, though I did go through a period with the wind screen reservoir kept developing a leak - the first time just after it had been serviced and this happened 3 times in all but there was never any charge for this - the last time they really went into depth on it and I don't expect this to recur.

    The difference in customer relations between Renault and Toyota is akin to the kick about of a ball on a Sunday afternoon in the park and first division football.

    I gained the impression they were only interested in making money on theirs sales of their cars and spares but little else which I find a very short sighted attitude because I swore after my experiences with them that I would never return.

    Toyota on the other hand always appear to be willing to go that extra mile to ensure that I am happy. There is always the possibility that all this is down to individual garages but considering the cost of a new car I am not going to take that chance.

    Edited by mike Meehan
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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    I've got a 1.6 Scenic that's 11 years old. 79000 miles and no problems whatsoever in the two years I've had it.... except for a snapped cambelt. But that wasn't the fault of the car, it was down to a seriously dodgy and dishonest dealer who swore he'd do the job between me paying the deposit and collecting the car. He didn't do it and the car went beyond the maximum mileage specified on the original belt, with disastrous consequences. Took out 14 valves and required a full head rebuild. Very fortunate to have a mechanic buddy who did the huge repair job for considerably less than Renault charge for a simple belt change. Did a cracking job,too. Don't neglect the belt, but don't go to a Renault dealer. You need to ask around and find a good independant spannerman - should cost less than 200 notes, still a fair wedge but it's far cheaper than a wrecked engine.

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    Posted
  • Location: Stockport
  • Location: Stockport

    I've got a 1.6 Scenic that's 11 years old. 79000 miles and no problems whatsoever in the two years I've had it.... except for a snapped cambelt. But that wasn't the fault of the car, it was down to a seriously dodgy and dishonest dealer who swore he'd do the job between me paying the deposit and collecting the car. He didn't do it and the car went beyond the maximum mileage specified on the original belt, with disastrous consequences. Took out 14 valves and required a full head rebuild. Very fortunate to have a mechanic buddy who did the huge repair job for considerably less than Renault charge for a simple belt change. Did a cracking job,too. Don't neglect the belt, but don't go to a Renault dealer. You need to ask around and find a good independant spannerman - should cost less than 200 notes, still a fair wedge but it's far cheaper than a wrecked engine.

    My brother had a Renault sport Clio 182 Cup for about 7-8 years, he only got rid when a woman not paying attention at traffic lights went into the back of it and wrote it off. He now has a Renault sport Megane 250. Both were faultless. I myself had a Citroen saxo for about 3-4 years and, believe it or not, was also faultless! The mechanic who lives across the road changed the cambelt on it for me, a relatively simple and inexpensive job.My other brother's German built Mini Cooper...less than faultless.I think you will be fine to be honest, but I would recommend a new cambelt, for peace of mind if nothing else. It shouldn't be a particularly big job unless that particular car has access issues and other things have to be removed/moved to change it.Generally speaking good maintenance is more important than nationality when it comes to cars, and German or Japanese cars need looking after just as much as French ones.I forgot to ask, how old is the car? Edited by March Blizzard
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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    Generally speaking good maintenance is more important than nationality when it comes to cars, and German or Japanese cars need looking after just as much as French ones. 

     

    Just keep on top of the oil / cambelt and air filter changes and stuff should go on for a long time. I've had lots of different makes and honestly, the Scenic has been far and away the most trouble-free. Had another Scenic in the past and that too was faultless. Maybe owners of Japanese and German cars stick to the maintenance routine better, for some reason?  I've got a Jap motorbike which is 26 years old - runs like it did when new, but I change the oil and filter at way-over-the-top 1000 mile intervals. No need to worry about the cambelt tho' - it's got an indestructible chain!

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    Posted
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny summers, cold snowy winters
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL

    I work with a chap whos girlfriend got a Scenic and so far in the 5months of owning it the fuel guage has bust so you can only guess how much petrol you have, the electric windows dont work, the clutch is dodgy... so with his story and yours I wouldnt touch a scenic with a barge pole.

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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    Well those are only minor faults which can happen to any car. How old and how many miles? I can only speak from experience but if the first Scenic I had was no good, I certainly wouldn't have got another. Both faultless ( first one had 102K on the clock) and the second one did well to far surpass the recommended cambelt change milestone before failure. Also, look how many Scenics which are 12yrs + are still around compared to other makes. Go on, take a look....

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    Posted
  • Location: Maidstone
  • Location: Maidstone

    I had two Renault scenics both were OK. Bought an espace had it for 10 months gave it back! Arrived without working radio, seat belt warning sensors went, break cable broke, clutch plate shattered leaving fragments of metal in engine which was not picked up by garage. They changed clutch plate told me all OK then on the drive home engine failed due to metal from clutch. New engine needed off road for 5 weeks. Engine management system failed in Holland so could not start car or do anything with it. Needed recovery. All work done by Renault garage. Customer service terrible. Had car on contract drove it back to garage gave keys back and told them to stuff it. Never paid another penny to them went and bought a VW not touched a french car since. Spoke to RAC a lot over those 10 months all service men said the same style on French cars great, electrics bad, customer service bad, more French cars break down than other makes.

    I bought the scenics from France new and the espace from a Renault dealer in Tonbridge brand new built to order so all works covered by warranty and all faults should not have happened.

    They told me my car was prob a Friday car. That term I feel was invented to shut me up.

    I am not saying you have bought a bad car Jan just giving you a brief account of some of the things I encountered with my espace but it was enough for me to never consider a french car again. I only bought the space because the scenic was such a good car.

    I don't think all French cars are bad but Renault customer service do not care about the customer in my experience they care about the sale.

    Edited by Snow Queen one
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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    I don't think all French cars are bad but Renault customer service do not care about the customer in my experience they care about the sale.

     

    I've often heard that said. But I'd never use a main dealer for repairs or whatever anyway, whatever the make of car. Different if the car's new and you have to claim on the warranty, I suppose.

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    Posted
  • Location: Stockport
  • Location: Stockport

    I think manufacturers are more equal in terms of build quality and refinement today than in the past. Old mercs (and German cars in general to an extent) were known to be "over" engineered and very well made, whereas at the same time French manufacturers probably weren't as stringent or thorough. However, with all the modern requirements and safety standards there has been a step up in manufacturing quality across the board. I'm not necessarily saying all are equal, just that the disparity is now less pronounced and stereotypes forged in the past are now less accurate. 

     

    A new Ford Mondeo or Vauxhall Astra feels similarly well built as a new Merc, Beemer, Lexus or Honda.

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    Posted
  • Location: Stockport
  • Location: Stockport

    Just keep on top of the oil / cambelt and air filter changes and stuff should go on for a long time. I've had lots of different makes and honestly, the Scenic has been far and away the most trouble-free. Had another Scenic in the past and that too was faultless. Maybe owners of Japanese and German cars stick to the maintenance routine better, for some reason?  I've got a Jap motorbike which is 26 years old - runs like it did when new, but I change the oil and filter at way-over-the-top 1000 mile intervals. No need to worry about the cambelt tho' - it's got an indestructible chain!

     

    That's a good point. I'd imagine that cheaper French cars are ordinarily bought by younger or casual drivers who perhaps are less interested (financially able?) to take good care of their cars. The typical German saloon is bought by those with a bit of dosh and is probably more likely to get manufacturer services. Jap cars probably span a larger demographic, although I've seen plenty of Accords and Primera's in the ownership of the elderly, many of which do a Sunday service every other week!

     

    Another important point is that all cars have particular faults, it's not strictly a manufacturer based problem across the entire model range.

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    Posted
  • Location: urmston
  • Location: urmston

    I find this website very useful. It shows all car manufacturers reliability on a sliding scale and it breaks down the faults. For example a "normal" car will have an index of 100. A more reliable car will be lower and a less reliable car more than 100. It is very surprising to see certain models have a terrible record. Check out the Bmw X3.

     

    http://www.reliabilityindex.com/reliability/search/283

     

    Another great website is Honest John.http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/

     

     

    Brian

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    Posted
  • Location: Stockport
  • Location: Stockport

    I find this website very useful. It shows all car manufacturers reliability on a sliding scale and it breaks down the faults. For example a "normal" car will have an index of 100. A more reliable car will be lower and a less reliable car more than 100. It is very surprising to see certain models have a terrible record. Check out the Bmw X3.

     

    http://www.reliabilityindex.com/reliability/search/283

     

    Another great website is Honest John.http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/

     

     

    Brian

     

    I'm pleasantly surprised to see the plucky Citroen Saxo in the top 10! The one I had didn't have power steering, so I suppose on a minimalist car like that there are less things to go wrong.

     

    It's like I said before in regards to model specific issues. It's unwise to have an attitude of "French = bad, German = good" because the reality doesn't always match.

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    I'm pleasantly surprised to see the plucky Citroen Saxo in the top 10! The one I had didn't have power steering, so I suppose on a minimalist car like that there are less things to go wrong.

     

    It's like I said before in regards to model specific issues. It's unwise to have an attitude of "French = bad, German = good" because the reality doesn't always match.

    Very true..i had a peugeot 309 diesel where the 'big end" went at 85,000 miles and needed a new engine...i remember the AA man saying he had never ever seen this happen on a diesel engine with such low miles..also had VW passat where the cam belt went at 67,000 miles bent all the valves again almost unheard on a VW was quoted 2000 notes to put right by VW local mechanic repaired it for 300. That was the last 2nd hand car i owned..tend to own cars from new on my car allowance..at the moment i have Audi A4 S line Quattro

    Edited by cheeky_monkey
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    Posted
  • Location: approx 3mls from coast Liverpool North West England & Andalusia
  • Weather Preferences: Any extreme weather conditions
  • Location: approx 3mls from coast Liverpool North West England & Andalusia

    My brother had a Renault sport Clio 182 Cup for about 7-8 years, he only got rid when a woman not paying attention at traffic lights went into the back of it and wrote it off. He now has a Renault sport Megane 250. Both were faultless.I myself had a Citroen saxo for about 3-4 years and, believe it or not, was also faultless! The mechanic who lives across the road changed the cambelt on it for me, a relatively simple and inexpensive job.My other brother's German built Mini Cooper...less than faultless.I think you will be fine to be honest, but I would recommend a new cambelt, for peace of mind if nothing else. It shouldn't be a particularly big job unless that particular car has access issues and other things have to be removed/moved to change it.Generally speaking good maintenance is more important than nationality when it comes to cars, and German or Japanese cars need looking after just as much as French ones.I forgot to ask, how old is the car?

    It's an 05 plate with 68000miles. Just had word from my mechanic, I have used him for years and trust him, steering rack had too much movement? whatever that means, he has sorted that and new brakes and has advised me to go and get the tracking done straight away, I suppose that's all general wear and tear.

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    Posted
  • Location: Peasedown St John.N.E.Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Fair to Foul...
  • Location: Peasedown St John.N.E.Somerset

    Don't like Renault as mine had a very leaky sunroof...

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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    I've had.... a Sierra which was plagued with electrical glitches, a Peugeot which liked to pop radiators and break drive shafts, an Astra which wouldn't stop even with new brakes, a Seat with self-destruct gearbox, a Kia with an exploding crankshaft, and a fair few others which have given me grief over the years. I've also had the two Scenics which have given me no hassle at all, except for the cambelt fiasco which was entirely expected under the circumstances and cannot by any stretch of the imagination be considered an inherant fault of the car.

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    Posted
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny summers, cold snowy winters
  • Location: Longlevens, 16m ASL / Bradley Stoke, 75m ASL

    Do you work for Renault, you seem to be getting very upset over the fact people have had bad experiences with theirs?

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    Posted
  • Location: Huddersfield, 145m ASL
  • Weather Preferences: Lots of snow, lots of hot sun
  • Location: Huddersfield, 145m ASL

    I've had all manner of cars over the last 30 years, and currently running an 07 Grand Scenic (for 10 months now, including drive to Venice and back via Mont Blanc tunnel), and a 52 Focus, (since 2006, done 130000 miles now) both of which have been excellent. All I'd say is:

     

    - buy documented low mileage cars privately, (buying 2nd hand from dealers doesn't get you anything more, and they'll sell you anything if they can get away with it, and charge over the odds doing it)

    - make sure your own maintenance is regular and thorough, (e.g. lubricant + coolant levels, tyre pressures)

    - never use a main dealer (they're expensive and couldn't care less), use a local garage with a good rep (their livelihood depends on maintaining that rep)

    - follow service intervals and important manufacturers recommendations e.g. cam belt changes

     

    Those are the rules I've followed and I've had Fords, Rovers, Peugeots, Renaults, Audis, Toyotas, Subarus, Lancias, Minis and even an old Talbot Horizon (!), and not one of them has caused me huge grief.

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    Posted
  • Location: Stockport
  • Location: Stockport

    Do you work for Renault, you seem to be getting very upset over the fact people have had bad experiences with theirs?

    He can't do, we've heard about how little Renault care about their customers!
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    Posted
  • Location: South Yorkshire
  • Location: South Yorkshire

    Do you work for Renault, you seem to be getting very upset over the fact people have had bad experiences with theirs?

     

    No, are you a disgruntled ex-employee or something? I couldn't give a **** what other people think of them  - mine have been fine and it's their loss if they go buy something else. Why should I care?

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