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Malaysian Airline flight MH370


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Can we not make "funny" comments about this? It's not exactly appropriate.

OMFG the penny has just dropped. It's not India or Iran its only actually god dam N.A.R.N.I.A.Quick someone alert the authorities.

I'm very surprised you have missed the obvious flaw in your 'hypothesis'....the airliner depicted in the 'jungle image' is not a Boeing-777!......A 777 has two wing mounted engines, whereas the aircra

Posted Images

Classic knocker response.They are children dying all around the world through war, poverty, malnutrition, disease, disaster, that you don't hear about, who grieves for them?

 

Wouldn't even respond to it Kev, this thread is about the missing plane, not dead children. If Knocker care's that much, I'm sure we will see him on the news soon from Syria grieving.... Although somehow I doubt it.

 

Anyways, just seen your latest picture of that Plane, that needs to be verified.

 

If true, it's clearly flying below radar.

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Anyways, just seen your latest picture of that Plane, that needs to be verified. If true, it's clearly flying below radar.

Funnily enough, I was browsing a couple of nights ago and came across an article which was referring to that plane. It's from ATS, I know, I know, but sometimes they can be quite quick in putting things of interest up quickly. Have a read:http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread1002982/pg1 I stopped reading when I thought they had solved it. Edited by Blitzen
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I'm spending an hour or so each day searching via  http://www.tomnod.com. Why not join up and help out?

 

Noticeably the last few satellite image maps I have been allocated have been over jungle rather than sea....don't know, but perhaps these are along the flightpath of that plane which appears to be flying extremely low over similar looking vegetation.

 

Unfortunately there is lots of cloud on the images that I'm currently looking at... dated Sunday. 

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I'm not sure about this, while we can't be sure of the size of the trees below, the scale looks odd somehow.

Is that hazyness behind the wings 'supposed to be' smoke or is it to hide a photoshop problem...

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I am becoming convinced by this theory offered by this pilot:-
 
"Chris Goodfellow has 20 years experience as a Canadian Class-1 instrumented-rated pilot for multi-engine planes. His theory on what happened to MH370 first appeared on Google+. We’ve copyedited it with his permission."

 

 

 
 
This comment under the article is also worthy of note (as is the fact that there was at least one eye-witness who saw a similar plane to this on fire):-
 
"First off, communications is the lowest priority of the aircrew when they are attempting to keep the aircraft in the air. Ground control cannot do anything to effect the outcome of the plane, so communicating down to them is thus a very low priority in a serious electrical fire situation.
 
While it may make sense from an armchair quarterback position, when you are in a serious incident and you have a strong adrenaline dump, you revert to training and muscle memory. These pilots may have done just that and not remembered to communicate outside the aircraft."
 
The article also offers a plausible explanation as to the apparent rise to 45,000 feet.
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The control freakery of the Malaysian authorities came to the fore this morning, with the dragging away of a couple of Chinese relatives from the daily press conference.

 

I hope this stirs up a hornet's nest for Malaysia. To be frank, I'm becoming sick of these procrastinating daily stage shows. :angry:

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That's nowhere near the two arcs of corridor they reckon the plane was based on that last ping.

Yes but I keep asking where are the plots of all the previous pings they mention, only this last one?If it was sending out a signal all those plots would give a path, would they not? Edited by HighPressure
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The control freakery of the Malaysian authorities came to the fore this morning, with the dragging away of a couple of Chinese relatives from the daily press conference.

 

I hope this stirs up a hornet's nest for Malaysia. To be frank, I'm becoming sick of these procrastinating daily stage shows. Posted Image

 

Whatever has happened to the jet, the one thing that's sure is that the Malaysian authorities have handled this appallingly.

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The control freakery of the Malaysian authorities came to the fore this morning, with the dragging away of a couple of Chinese relatives from the daily press conference.

 

I hope this stirs up a hornet's nest for Malaysia. To be frank, I'm becoming sick of these procrastinating daily stage shows. Posted Image

This was horrific. How dare the Malaysian authorities hurt these people going through unimaginable suffering. Sod sanctions on Russia, the international community should impose sanctions on Malaysia and force them to sort this out - every resource available needs to be used to find this aircraft. I've been talking about this today with some of my Chinese and Indonesian students - culturally these folks are very private and face saving, the humiliation involved in this "stage show" as you quite rightly call it is deeply disrespectful.

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An electrical fire, which is the pilots theory in Wired ^(previous link I posted) seems to be the most plausible. Usually the simplest explanation is the correct one.

 

Something like that I think. The search focus seems to have moved to the S Indian Ocean, Australia performing a major search in that area now, many hours flying away from last contact.

 

Posted Image

 

Why would hijackers fly the plane for hours across the Indian Ocean into the middle of nowhere? Nowhere to land, no targets to attack, likely not enough fuel to get back to land. No ransom demands, no communcation. What were the passengers doing for maybe 7 hours, watching movies? Could have stormed the cockpit long before the end like with UA93 on 9/11. If pilot suicide - again why fly for hours into the middle of nowhere possibly to the point of fuel exhaustion instead of just crashing the plane into the ocean ASAP such as EgyptAir Flight 990 (likely pilot suicide)? Seems to fit more with the idea of the crew/passengers becoming disabled by hypoxia or smoke, the plane then flying under autopilot until it ran out of fuel.

 

Sad thing is - the plane might never be found (esp. the flight recorders) and will never know what happened - debris found by now would have moved a long distance by wind and ocean currents making finding the main wreckage and flight recorders even more difficult. It took 2 years to find the Air France main wreckage, recorders and the surface wreckage was foundy relatively quickly (transponders on so they knew where to look fairly precisely). Water is very deep in the Indian Ocean so it's looking grim. The voice recorders only record the last 2 hours so they may tell us nowt about what happened in the cockpit when the plane first vanished anyway.

 

Feel sorry for the relatives, at least with the Air France crash they knew pretty soon those on board were all lost and eventually knew more or the less the full story of what happened. The not knowing anything must be the worst, even if they're alive or not (with theories it might have landed somewhere), can only imagine how terrible that must be. No wonder frustration and despair is boiling over.

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Something like that I think. The search focus seems to have moved to the S Indian Ocean, Australia performing a major search in that area now, many hours flying away from last contact.

 

Posted Image

 

Why would hijackers fly the plane for hours across the Indian Ocean into the middle of nowhere? Nowhere to land, no targets to attack, likely not enough fuel to get back to land. No ransom demands, no communcation. What were the passengers doing for maybe 7 hours, watching movies? Could have stormed the cockpit long before the end like with UA93 on 9/11. If pilot suicide - again why fly for hours into the middle of nowhere possibly to the point of fuel exhaustion instead of just crashing the plane into the ocean ASAP such as EgyptAir Flight 990 (likely pilot suicide)? Seems to fit more with the idea of the crew/passengers becoming disabled by hypoxia or smoke, the plane then flying under autopilot until it ran out of fuel.

 

Sad thing is - the plane might never be found (esp. the flight recorders) and will never know what happened - debris found by now would have moved a long distance by wind and ocean currents making finding the main wreckage and flight recorders even more difficult. It took 2 years to find the Air France main wreckage, recorders and the surface wreckage was foundy relatively quickly (transponders on so they knew where to look fairly precisely). Water is very deep in the Indian Ocean so it's looking grim. The voice recorders only record the last 2 hours so they may tell us nowt about what happened in the cockpit when the plane first vanished anyway.

 

Feel sorry for the relatives, at least with the Air France crash they knew pretty soon those on board were all lost and eventually knew more or the less the full story of what happened. The not knowing anything must be the worst, even if they're alive or not (with theories it might have landed somewhere), can only imagine how terrible that must be. No wonder frustration and despair is boiling over.

 

Very insightful post there. It's grim news indeed but I am confident that international concern will be high enough to try and find the black box. Mind you, given the size and depth of water - it will be worse than searching for a needle in a haystack.

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I'm really hung up on this relatives thing. These folks need care and attention, love and support. I take this perspective from personal experience. Several years ago my father was dying from colon cancer. As is pretty common with this illness, he suffered a stroke. I got news of this at about 1800 one evening. My parents lived in Ireland. There were no local flights that evening or night, but I managed to get an early morning flight for the next day booked from Birmingham. My husband had a major work commitment next day so we agreed that he would leave me to the airport that evening. I spent the night and slept (very little) there with only the company of friendly policemen. It was agonising  - not knowing whether Dad would be alive or dead when I got there (mobile phones were not bricks but not run of the mill either back then). These folks have had a week of this.

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There are still some questions though:-

 

- If black boxes are generator or battery-powered, then how could an electrical fire be responsible for turning off its signal?

- If the crew were in a state of hypoxia, then why didn't autopilot land them to the nearest airport? 

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Can I ask for some opinions on this please? I have a very uneasy feeling about this interview.(Fox - 3 hours ago) It feels almost as if the stage is being set here. Very leading questions and very strong accusations. Also conflicting answers. Does anyone remember a while back when a report was made apparently from Boeing in which it was stated that ping No.6 indicated that it was coming from the SOUTHERN Indian Ocean around the Diego Garcia area? Shortly afterwards, Boeing said that they wouldn't be making any more announcements as they didn't wish to interfere with the current investigation? Erm...that's some location difference is it not.

ETA: Just caught last few seconds of interview on News24 when I turned on. Someone I assume was being interviewed re the plane and they were talking about the pings. The interviewee stated that it was highly probable that the pings were in the southern ocean. Hope it comes on again during 7pm broadcast just to check.

http://nation.foxnews.com/2014/03/19/could-missing-plane-be-held-pakistan

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There are still some questions though:-

 

- If black boxes are generator or battery-powered, then how could an electrical fire be responsible for turning off its signal?

- If the crew were in a state of hypoxia, then why didn't autopilot land them to the nearest airport? 

Stop stop stop!

 

The black boxes (bright orange actually) are the devices which are designed to survive a crash and give investigators technical and cockpit voice information in the time leading up to the incident.They are not the same as transponders which relay information about the active flight's position. Have a look at the Air France stuff - it's disturbing reading but very informative. I'm a frequent flyer and a relaxed traveller, but even I found this hard to assimilate.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/the-last-harrowing-minutes-inside-air-france-447s-cockpit/article4393626/ 

 

I couldn't find the one I read originally, but have checked this and it is similar though not a source I would normally use.

 

Autopilots (George to be friendly), are programmed. They are assigned a set course by the pilots and they follow it. They can land an aircraft but don't usually, and only if told to do so - pilots do like to "baby" us down - . They are not self thinking systems which will find the nearest landing area in the event of an emergency.

 

It worries me that so many folks are unrealistic about the technology behind air travel - maybe that's why so many strangers have ended up holding my hand on flights (usually bumpy ones) to the point of cutting off circulation over the years Posted Image I'm a Myers Briggs INFP (look it up) so I get it, seem to attract it, and don't mind it (but I might be sick on you if it gets too rough!)...

Edited by Spikecollie
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Well, something stinks! Caught that interview on News 24. Apparently, two sources have stated (one on the record and one off the record) according to the correspondent, that the signals had to be coming from a moving plane. The last ping received at 08.11am. Both agree also that the plane was heading directly due south towards the south pole. Apparently Australia heard these signals also and are wondering why this information has not been made public. Sources and Australia said Malaysian Government had to know. Well someone has to be lying in all of this. Look at the Fox News interview in my post above. It directly contradicts the information put out by the BBC.

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http://www.avherald.com/h?article=44078aa7&opt=0

 

This is interesting - from 2011. An electrical cockpit fire on a Boeing 777 (same as this plane) causing large amounts of toxic smoke and burning a hole in the fuselage.

 

"fire burned through the right hand side of the cockpit leaving a hole of about the size of the first officer's side window in the fuselage just below that window."

 

Luckily this was on the ground. Imagine if something similar happened mid-flight - electrical fire, electrical equipment fails/is turned off, toxic smoke and then a hole in the fuselage resulting in decompression...

 

Also

 

"Examination of the aircraft revealed that the fire originated near the first officer's oxygen mask supply tubing, which is located underneath the side console below the no. 3 right hand flight deck window. Oxygen from the flight crew oxygen system is suspected to have contributed to the fire's intensity and speed."

 

This could have severed the supply to the pilots/crew's oxygen masks...

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A Startlingly Simple Theory About the Missing Malaysia Airlines Jet

We know there was a last voice transmission that, from a pilot’s point of view, was entirely normal. “Good night†is customary on a hand-off to a new air traffic control. The “good night†also strongly indicates to me that all was OK on the flight deck. Remember, there are many ways a pilot can communicate distress. A hijack code or even transponder code off by one digit would alert ATC that something was wrong. Every good pilot knows keying an SOS over the mike always is an option. Even three short clicks would raise an alert. So I conclude that at the point of voice transmission all was perceived as well on the flight deck by the pilots.

But things could have been in the process of going wrong, unknown to the pilots.

Evidently the ACARS went inoperative some time before. Disabling the ACARS is not easy, as pointed out. This leads me to believe more in an electrical problem or an electrical fire than a manual shutdown. I suggest the pilots probably were not aware ACARS was not transmitting.

As for the reports of altitude fluctuations, given that this was not transponder-generated data but primary radar at maybe 200 miles, the azimuth readings can be affected by a lot of atmospherics and I would not have high confidence in this being totally reliable. But let’s accept for a minute that the pilot may have ascended to 45,000 feet in a last-ditch effort to quell a fire by seeking the lowest level of oxygen. That is an acceptable scenario. At 45,000 feet, it would be tough to keep this aircraft stable, as the flight envelope is very narrow and loss of control in a stall is entirely possible. The aircraft is at the top of its operational ceiling. The reported rapid rates of descent could have been generated by a stall, followed by a recovery at 25,000 feet. The pilot may even have been diving to extinguish flames.

But going to 45,000 feet in a hijack scenario doesn’t make any good sense to me.

Regarding the additional flying time: On departing Kuala Lampur, Flight 370 would have had fuel for Beijing and an alternate destination, probably Shanghai, plus 45 minutes–say, 8 hours. Maybe more. He burned 20-25 percent in the first hour with takeoff and the climb to cruise. So when the turn was made toward Langkawi, he would have had six hours or more hours worth of fuel. This correlates nicely with the Inmarsat data pings being received until fuel exhaustion.

The now known continued flight until time to fuel exhaustion only confirms to me that the crew was incapacitated and the flight continued on deep into the south Indian ocean.

There is no point speculating further until more evidence surfaces, but in the meantime it serves no purpose to malign pilots who well may have been in a struggle to save this aircraft from a fire or other serious mechanical issue.

http://www.wired.com/autopia/2014/03/mh370-electrical-fire/

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