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"All right, good night"  - pilot on flight MH370

 

"All right, good night" - last words to be said to control from one of the pilots.
 
Are these words the standard chat from pilot to control? this would make a difference to my thoughts here.
 
I ask myself these questions:
 
Q1 - Are these coded words is there a code in what words the pilot used?
 
Q2 - What was said before the "last words"
 
But...
 
A1 - They turned of communications why would they want to code word a place/area, but the code words if they are could mean something else.
 
A2 - ??? before last words??
 
Have come up with a few things a few possible decodes on this if it is a coded sentence:
 
Mixed up words - 
 
right night.
 
all night.
 
night all.
 
(could be more word mixs there)
 
Letters in order taken from each word from the first of each, and so on..
 
a, r, g, n (first letters of words foward)
 
n, g, r, a (backwards)
 
l, i, o, i / i, o, i, l (2nd)
 
l, g, o, g / g, o, g, l   (3rd)
 
h, d, h. (4th)
 
t, t, (5th)
 
 
Two great country names come up from letters within the sentence "All right, good night" and these are:
 
I.N.D.I.A
 
I.R.A.N
 
-------------
 
Very much unlikely just a coincidence those letters are in those words but looking at things like this is a need, because it does happen-coded words, also what was the tone of the voices from the pilots during the communication?? and was it the normal tone from them as from other radio communication with them??
Edited by Tobor
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Can we not make "funny" comments about this? It's not exactly appropriate.

OMFG the penny has just dropped. It's not India or Iran its only actually god dam N.A.R.N.I.A.Quick someone alert the authorities.

I'm very surprised you have missed the obvious flaw in your 'hypothesis'....the airliner depicted in the 'jungle image' is not a Boeing-777!......A 777 has two wing mounted engines, whereas the aircra

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From another forumA lot of speculation about MH370. Terrorism, hijack, meteors. I cannot believe the analysis on CNN - almost disturbing. I tend to look for a more simple explanation of this event.Loaded 777 departs midnight from Kuala to Beijing. Hot night. Heavy aircraft. About an hour out across the gulf towards Vietnam the plane goes dark meaning the transponder goes off and secondary radar tracking goes off.Two days later we hear of reports that Malaysian military radar (which is a primary radar meaning the plane is being tracked by reflection rather than by transponder interrogation response) has tracked the plane on a southwesterly course back across the Malay Peninsula into the straits of Malacca.When I heard this I immediately brought up Google Earth and I searched for airports in proximity to the track towards southwest.The left turn is the key here. This was a very experienced senior Captain with 18,000 hours. Maybe some of the younger pilots interviewed on CNN didn't pick up on this left turn. We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Airports behind us, airports abeam us and airports ahead of us. Always in our head. Always. Because if something happens you don't want to be thinking what are you going to do - you already know what you are going to do. Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport. Actually he was taking a direct route to Palau Langkawi a 13,000 foot strip with an approach over water at night with no obstacles. He did not turn back to Kuala Lampur because he knew he had 8,000 foot ridges to cross. He knew the terrain was friendlier towards Langkawi and also a shorter distance.Take a look on Google Earth at this airport. This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event onboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport.For me the loss of transponders and communications makes perfect sense if a fire. There was most likely a fire or electrical fire. In the case of fire the first response if to pull all the main busses and restore circuits one by one until you have isolated the bad one.If they pulled the busses the plane indeed would go silent. It was probably a serious event and they simply were occupied with controlling the plane and trying to fight the fire. Aviate, Navigate and lastly communicate. There are two types of fires. Electrical might not be as fast and furious and there might or might not be incapacitating smoke. However there is the possibility given the timeline that perhaps there was an overheat on one of the front landing gear tires and it blew on takeoff and started slowly burning. Yes this happens with underinflated tires. Remember heavy plane, hot night, sea level, long run takeoff. There was a well known accident in Nigeria of a DC8 that had a landing gear fire on takeoff. A tire fire once going would produce horrific incapacitating smoke. Yes, pilots have access to oxygen masks but this is a no no with fire. Most have access to a smoke hood with a filter but this will only last for a few minutes depending on the smoke level. (I used to carry one of my own in a flight bag and I still carry one in my briefcase today when I fly).What I think happened is that they were overcome by smoke and the plane just continued on the heading probably on George (autopilot) until either fuel exhaustion or fire destroyed the control surfaces and it crashed. I said four days ago you will find it along that route - looking elsewhere was pointless.This pilot, as I say, was a hero struggling with an impossible situation trying to get that plane to Langkawi. No doubt in my mind. That's the reason for the turn and direct route. A hijack would not have made that deliberate left turn with a direct heading for Langkawi. It would probably have weaved around a bit until the hijackers decided on where they were taking it.Surprisingly none of the reporters , officials, other pilots interviewed have looked at this from the pilot's viewpoint. If something went wrong where would he go? Thanks to Google earth I spotted Langkawi in about 30 seconds, zoomed in and saw how long the runway was and I just instinctively knew this pilot knew this airport. He had probably flown there many times. I guess we will eventually find out when you help me spread this theory on the net and some reporters finally take a look on Google earth and put 2 and 2 together. Also a look at the age and number of cycles on those nose tires might give us a good clue too.Fire in an aircraft demands one thing - you get the machine on the ground as soon as possible. There are two well remembered experiences in my memory. The AirCanada DC9 which landed I believe in Columbus Ohio in the eighties. That pilot delayed descent and bypassed several airports. He didn't instinctively know the closest airports. He got it on the ground eventually but lost 30 odd souls. In the 1998 crash of Swissair DC-10 off Nova Scotia was another example of heroic pilots. They were 15 minutes out of Halifax but the fire simply overcame them and they had to ditch in the ocean. Just ran out of time. That fire incidentally started when the aircraft was about an hour out of Kennedy. Guess what the transponders and communications were shut off as they pulled the busses.Get on Google Earth and type in Pulau Langkawi and then look at it in relation to the radar track heading. 2+2=4 That for me is the simple explanation why it turned and headed in that direction.Smart pilot. Just didn't have the time.

You speak a great deal of sense.

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From another forum

A lot of speculation about MH370. Terrorism, hijack, meteors. I cannot believe the analysis on CNN - almost disturbing. I tend to look for a more simple explanation of this event.

Loaded 777 departs midnight from Kuala to Beijing. Hot night. Heavy aircraft. About an hour out across the gulf towards Vietnam the plane goes dark meaning the transponder goes off and secondary radar tracking goes off.

Two days later we hear of reports that Malaysian military radar (which is a primary radar meaning the plane is being tracked by reflection rather than by transponder interrogation response) has tracked the plane on a southwesterly course back across the Malay Peninsula into the straits of Malacca.

When I heard this I immediately brought up Google Earth and I searched for airports in proximity to the track towards southwest.

The left turn is the key here. This was a very experienced senior Captain with 18,000 hours. Maybe some of the younger pilots interviewed on CNN didn't pick up on this left turn. We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Airports behind us, airports abeam us and airports ahead of us. Always in our head. Always. Because if something happens you don't want to be thinking what are you going to do - you already know what you are going to do. Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport. Actually he was taking a direct route to Palau Langkawi a 13,000 foot strip with an approach over water at night with no obstacles. He did not turn back to Kuala Lampur because he knew he had 8,000 foot ridges to cross. He knew the terrain was friendlier towards Langkawi and also a shorter distance.

Take a look on Google Earth at this airport. This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event onboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport.

For me the loss of transponders and communications makes perfect sense if a fire. There was most likely a fire or electrical fire. In the case of fire the first response if to pull all the main busses and restore circuits one by one until you have isolated the bad one.

If they pulled the busses the plane indeed would go silent. It was probably a serious event and they simply were occupied with controlling the plane and trying to fight the fire. Aviate, Navigate and lastly communicate. There are two types of fires. Electrical might not be as fast and furious and there might or might not be incapacitating smoke. However there is the possibility given the timeline that perhaps there was an overheat on one of the front landing gear tires and it blew on takeoff and started slowly burning. Yes this happens with underinflated tires. Remember heavy plane, hot night, sea level, long run takeoff. There was a well known accident in Nigeria of a DC8 that had a landing gear fire on takeoff. A tire fire once going would produce horrific incapacitating smoke. Yes, pilots have access to oxygen masks but this is a no no with fire. Most have access to a smoke hood with a filter but this will only last for a few minutes depending on the smoke level. (I used to carry one of my own in a flight bag and I still carry one in my briefcase today when I fly).

What I think happened is that they were overcome by smoke and the plane just continued on the heading probably on George (autopilot) until either fuel exhaustion or fire destroyed the control surfaces and it crashed. I said four days ago you will find it along that route - looking elsewhere was pointless.

This pilot, as I say, was a hero struggling with an impossible situation trying to get that plane to Langkawi. No doubt in my mind. That's the reason for the turn and direct route. A hijack would not have made that deliberate left turn with a direct heading for Langkawi. It would probably have weaved around a bit until the hijackers decided on where they were taking it.

Surprisingly none of the reporters , officials, other pilots interviewed have looked at this from the pilot's viewpoint. If something went wrong where would he go? Thanks to Google earth I spotted Langkawi in about 30 seconds, zoomed in and saw how long the runway was and I just instinctively knew this pilot knew this airport. He had probably flown there many times. I guess we will eventually find out when you help me spread this theory on the net and some reporters finally take a look on Google earth and put 2 and 2 together. Also a look at the age and number of cycles on those nose tires might give us a good clue too.

Fire in an aircraft demands one thing - you get the machine on the ground as soon as possible. There are two well remembered experiences in my memory. The AirCanada DC9 which landed I believe in Columbus Ohio in the eighties. That pilot delayed descent and bypassed several airports. He didn't instinctively know the closest airports. He got it on the ground eventually but lost 30 odd souls. In the 1998 crash of Swissair DC-10 off Nova Scotia was another example of heroic pilots. They were 15 minutes out of Halifax but the fire simply overcame them and they had to ditch in the ocean. Just ran out of time. That fire incidentally started when the aircraft was about an hour out of Kennedy. Guess what the transponders and communications were shut off as they pulled the busses.

Get on Google Earth and type in Pulau Langkawi and then look at it in relation to the radar track heading. 2+2=4 That for me is the simple explanation why it turned and headed in that direction.

Smart pilot. Just didn't have the time.

 

“This scenario begins with the eruption of hazardous materials within the cargo hold – either improperly packaged or illegally shipped – or both.â€

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/missing-malaysian-airlines-flight-mh370-3254927

 

 

It would be interesting to find out the content of the cargo hold !

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“This scenario begins with the eruption of hazardous materials within the cargo hold – either improperly packaged or illegally shipped – or both.â€

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/missing-malaysian-airlines-flight-mh370-3254927

 

 

It would be interesting to find out the content of the cargo hold !

 

I can't remember but they 100% said there was nothing hazardous in there. It was mainly fruit and stuff to China.

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If it was pilot suicide, why didn't they crash the plane there and then? Why go miles off course?

If it was miles off course, why didn't any of the passengers try and ring their phones warning what was going on assuming it was pilot suicide?

Surely a flight attendant would have tried to use some form of communication warning the ground what was going if it was pilot suicide and they were flying miles off course?

Can you ring a mobile from an airplane in flight?

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"All right, good night" - last words to be said to control from one of the pilots. Are these words the standard chat from pilot to control? this would make a difference to my thoughts here. I ask myself these questions: Q1 - Are these coded words is there a code in what words the pilot used? Q2 - What was said before the "last words" But... A1 - They turned of communications why would they want to code word a place/area, but the code words if they are could mean something else. A2 - ??? before last words?? Have come up with a few things a few possible decodes on this if it is a coded sentence: Mixed up words -  right night. all night. night all. (could be more word mixs there) Letters in order taken from each word from the first of each, and so on.. a, r, g, n (first letters of words foward) n, g, r, a (backwards) l, i, o, i / i, o, i, l (2nd) l, g, o, g / g, o, g, l   (3rd) h, d, h. (4th) t, t, (5th)  Two great country names come up from letters within the sentence "All right, good night" and these are: I.N.D.I.A I.R.A.N ------------- Very much unlikely just a coincidence those letters are in those words but looking at things like this is a need, because it does happen-coded words, also what was the tone of the voices from the pilots during the communication?? and was it the normal tone from them as from other radio communication with them??

OMFG the penny has just dropped. It's not India or Iran its only actually god dam N.A.R.N.I.A.Quick someone alert the authorities. Edited by No Balls Like Snow Balls
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If it was a cyber attack from someone on board who disengaged the communication systems and sent the plane off course,  perhaps investigators have knowledge of this, but it has been hushed up in order to prevent a 'worldwide panic'?

 

But that leaves us with the point that Weather-history raised, what about people on the plane and their mobile phones? From what I've read, yes, messages can be sent successfully. A signal can usually be reached by placing phone close to window even at these high altitudes.

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"All right, good night" - last words to be said to control from one of the pilots.
 
Are these words the standard chat from pilot to control? this would make a difference to my thoughts here.
 
I ask myself these questions:

 

 

I think you are looking into things just a wee bit too much. Reading input from pilots, saying "all right, good night" or variations is a perfectly normal thing to say when a plane leaves a ATC domain. Just a friendly 'bye!' to the controllers as the plane leaves their airspace.

Edited by Bobby
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So China now searching its own land? Really so they just happen to miss a unidentified 777 jet entering their airspace?? I am afraid I don't buy that one.

They talk of these pings for hours after radar contact was lost yet there is no position plot of them just the one said to have been picked up by the satalite. There is still no proof that I can see to say the pane made another turn or that the equipment on board was turned off deliberately. I agree with the fire/de compression type theory which surely has to be the mst logical, with the plane going down somewhere in the Indian Ocean after running out of fuel. Many miles from any radar coverage.

Edited by HighPressure
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Kinda get the feeling that one country's military knows a little more about this flight but didn't want to say anything about it at the time...

 

but as more time passes it's getting politically embarrassing for a country's military not to have noticed an unidentified jet flying over it.   Who's going to own up to either shooting it down or not noticing it in their airspace?  

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OMFG the penny has just dropped. It's not India or Iran its only actually god dam N.A.R.N.I.A.Quick someone alert the authorities.

Only that in this word Narnia the only N in the sentence " All right, good night" is used twice but only once in each of the two county names.. and each other letter of the sentence is used once too..

Edited by Tobor
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I think you are looking into things just a wee bit too much. Reading input from pilots, saying "all right, good night" or variations is a perfectly normal thing to say when a plane leaves a ATC domain. Just a friendly 'bye!' to the controllers as the plane leaves their airspace.

Need to look at every angle every tiny little thing that might not seem obvious but without getting into paranoia of conspiracy's, although cover ups are possible and are a lower level of conspiracy. 

 

Back in the 80s when I was a kid the radio (think was LW) had chatter as aircraft went over, would interupt the music or other, you would hear the height changes and other tecy words, not the usual everyday words anyone uses as to why I asked about this, do UK pilots use this type of talk with the ground?

 

Things are done differently in other countries so I don't know.

 

To add, what a cover-up is to others is normal to some.. 

Edited by Tobor
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Only that in this word Narnia the only N in the sentence " All right, good night" is used twice but only once in each of the two county names.. and each other letter of the sentence is used once too..

 

Ahhh, I get it, but what they might have done, is used the "h" in "night", took some scissors and cut the tip off, giving a "n" - which to any sane person, clearly makes the NARNIA theory quite plausible.

 

If only we could find Aslan and ask him.

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Not overly convincing when it says. 

 

A senior police officer with direct knowledge of the investigation said the programs from the pilot's simulator included Indian Ocean runways in the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Diego Garcia and southern India, although he added that US and European runways also featured.

He probably bought a pack with most major airports, which is not particularly surprising and certainly not suspicious for a pilot.

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I'm still going for depressurization, got to be the most likely thing, especially as reports it flew above 45'000 feet, it's well to the west of Australia 2 miles down in Indian 0cean, tragic case

Yep! Sadly it'll turn out to be just a (rare) failure of our (sometimes) fallible technology. Those poor relatives now threatening to go on hunger strike because they are so desperate. I do hope the evidence, even if it is grim, is found for them soon. People need to grieve, not hold false hopes.

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Yep! Sadly it'll turn out to be just a (rare) failure of our (sometimes) fallible technology. Those poor relatives now threatening to go on hunger strike because they are so desperate. I do hope the evidence, even if it is grim, is found for them soon. People need to grieve, not hold false hopes.

 

I agree it's very sad but let's keep a sense of perspective. There are 11,420 Children dead In Syria's Civil War, So far. Something that is no longer front page news. Who is grieving for them?

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I agree it's very sad but let's keep a sense of perspective. There are 11,420 Children dead In Syria's Civil War, So far. Something that is no longer front page news. Who is grieving for them?

Classic knocker response.They are children dying all around the world through war, poverty, malnutrition, disease, disaster, that you don't hear about, who grieves for them?
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