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Malaysian Airline flight MH370


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Can we not make "funny" comments about this? It's not exactly appropriate.

OMFG the penny has just dropped. It's not India or Iran its only actually god dam N.A.R.N.I.A.Quick someone alert the authorities.

I'm very surprised you have missed the obvious flaw in your 'hypothesis'....the airliner depicted in the 'jungle image' is not a Boeing-777!......A 777 has two wing mounted engines, whereas the aircra

Posted Images

It's fanciful and unhelpful for the relatives to raise hopes it maybe flew on and landed somewhere.It's very unlikely to have been able to avoid radar and where is there a suitable 'secret' landing site for a large plane like this?If they were effectively stealing it they would likely want to be able to take off again so some bit  grass or desert won't do.It will have come down but for whatever reason well outside the original search area.There is always a chance of some survivors though, even weeks after the crash it can't be ruled out if came down on or near land. 

Correct it is not good to expect any less than the worst case, but a feeling of hope is still there at least. 

Edited by Tobor
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I have drawn on 2 maps here:

 

The first is to zoom in to the last known track to the west, my line is the yellow dotted:

post-11361-0-11439700-1395030730_thumb.j

 

The second map below may interest you more as it is after looking at the area via Google maps satellite my idea of a possible route taken by the missing plane:

post-11361-0-52128400-1395030799_thumb.j

My line white dotted line with arrows.

 

The reason for the dotted line along this particular track is the theory that hijackers want to keep the plane for a reason and to so avoid crashing, going to far south they would run out of fuel, my guess here is simply that to avoid radar coverage they would travel over open sea and head towards land, I would expect the zones the arrows point to at the end of my drawn line are quite flat and deserts, so they could land there OK I would imagine (unlike the forest areas in other places) I do not know if radar covers the line I have drawn just less chance it does than others routes I could have placed on map. 

 

I have been thinking about the pilots simulator and whether or not if it was him then had he taken/tested the route on the simulator program??

 

I like to think and hope that the pilots not to do with the missing plane I feel that someone else on board has/had taken control of things and it is not the pilots or flight staff or the usual passengers that are involved.

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relatives were ringing missing folks mobile phones and they were ringing (no answer obviously)..but why can't the phone signals be tracked and at least greatly narrow down the search area..

 

we are always being told that everything is tracked nowadays..so ???. Posted Image none of this twilight zone style mystery adds up.Posted Image

But....if you unplug a house phone and I then phone it from mobile. ..it does give a ring tone and you think its ringing but it isnt. And there would possibly be no masts to pick up a signal wherever the plane landed...especially in remote areas or the sea.
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But....if you unplug a house phone and I then phone it from mobile. ..it does give a ring tone and you think its ringing but it isnt. And there would possibly be no masts to pick up a signal wherever the plane landed...especially in remote areas or the sea.

The phone in your house runs from an exchange. This is where the ringing tone comes from. The phone line will ring in the exchange but the connection to your house will not be made without the phone being plugged in.When I have rung family on mobiles when they are in flight I get the unavailable message because their phones are turned off. I have had to ring to see if they have landed so that's how I know.Also if a mobile is out of range I get the same unavailable message.I wonder what sort of ringing tone they heard as countries have different tones. I think we will never know either what happened to this flight. I feed so sad for the relatives.
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There are special programmes on Sky News later. One at 4:30pm and one at 8:30pm. Just check on that but I think that's correct.

The phone in your house runs from an exchange. This is where the ringing tone comes from. The phone line will ring in the exchange but the connection to your house will not be made without the phone being plugged in.When I have rung family on mobiles when they are in flight I get the unavailable message because their phones are turned off. I have had to ring to see if they have landed so that's how I know.Also if a mobile is out of range I get the same unavailable message.I wonder what sort of ringing tone they heard as countries have different tones. I think we will never know either what happened to this flight. I feed so sad for the relatives.

Ah..of course. Didn't think that one through. :O Yes...it must be horrific for the relatives perhaps never knowing where their loved ones are.
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This is actually a good read, and plausible according to Aviation experts... http://keithledgerwood.tumblr.com/post/79838944823/did-malaysian-airlines-370-disappear-using-sia68

Don't you think though that, according to where this article possibly places the plane, that in itself is a bit suspicious? North of India, and Afghanistan places it within possibly, the "5 Stan" area.With everything that is happening politically at the moment, It is hard to evaluate any suggestion without suspicion?In the post–Cold War era, Central Asia is an ethnic cauldron, prone to instability and conflicts, without a sense of national identity, but rather a mess of historical cultural influences, tribal and clan loyalties, and religious fervor. Projecting influence into the area is no longer just Russia, but also Turkey, Iran, China, Pakistan, India and the United States:Russia continues to dominate political decision-making throughout the former SSRs; although, as other countries move into the area, Russia's influence has begun to wane.The United States, with its military involvement in the region and oil diplomacy, is also significantly involved in the region's politics. The United States and other NATO members are the main contributors to the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan and also exert considerable influence in other Central Asian nations.China has security ties with Central Asian states through the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, and conducts energy trade bilaterally.[29]India has geographic proximity to the Central Asian region and, in addition, enjoys considerable influence on Afghanistan.[30][31] India maintains a military base at Farkhor, Tajikistan, and also has extensive military relations with Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.[32]Turkey also exerts considerable influence in the region on account of its ethnic and linguistic ties with the Turkic peoples of Central Asia and its involvement in the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline. Political and economic relations are growing rapidly (e.g., Turkey recently eliminated visa requirements for citizens of the Central Asian Turkic republics).Iran, the seat of historical empires that controlled parts of Central Asia, has historical and cultural links to the region and is vying to construct an oil pipeline from the Caspian Sea to the Persian Gulf.Pakistan, a nuclear-armed Islamic state, has a history of political relations with neighboring Afghanistan and is termed capable of exercising influence. For some Central Asian nations, the shortest route to the ocean lies through Pakistan. Pakistan seeks natural gas from Central Asia and supports the development of pipelines from its countries. The mountain ranges and areas in northern Pakistan lie on the fringes of greater Central Asia; the Gilgit–Baltistan region of Pakistan lies adjacent to Tajikistan, separated only by the narrow Afghan Wakhan Corridor. Being located on the northwest of South Asia, the area forming modern-day Pakistan maintained extensive historical and cultural links with the region
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Why are they placing so much emphasis on CCTV coverage of the Captain and his co-pilot going through security? I would have thought this was standard procedure for passengers and crew alike.

I think the whole hijack/pirate theory is a non-starter. You cannot land a plane safely on the sea or in dense forests or jungles. If it has landed at an airport then surely, someone could inform the relevant authorities. Or have the perpetrators taken over and are terrorising an entire airport. No...the plane has ditched into the sea or a remote region and I think they will find debris in due course. The search area apparently covers 2,000,000 square miles. That's a huge area to cover.

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Good post Blitzen - Remember where they found Osama ? Pakistan. Something about this whole thing isn't right.

Main article: Air Force Satellite Control NetworkThe United States Air Force operates a remote tracking station on Diego Garcia. Its call sign is REEF. This facility became more vital after the closure of the Indian Ocean Station in 1996.[citation needed]GEODSS Station[edit]The United States Air Force Operates a station of the Ground-based Electro-optical Deep Space Surveillance system on the southern end of the atoll.[citation needed]7.41173°S 72.45222°EGlobal positioning system monitoring station[edit]Diego Garcia is one of the five control bases for the Global Positioning System, operated by the United States military. The United States Air Force also has monitoring stations in Hawaii, Kwajalein, Ascension Island, and Colorado Springs. The stations synchronise and update the atomic clocks on the 24 orbiting satellites that emit the signals used by GPS receivers.7.26654999°S 72.36312094°E[127]HF global station[edit]Main article: High Frequency Global Communications SystemThe United States Air Force operates a High Frequency Global Communications System transceiver site located on the south end of the atoll near the GEODSS station. The transceiver is operated remotely from Joint Base Andrews and locally maintained by NCTS FE personnel.[citation needed]Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Far East Detachment Diego Garcia[edit]Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Far East Detachment Diego Garcia operates a detachment in Diego Garcia. This detachment provides base telephone communications, provides base network services (Local Network Services Center), pier connectivity services, an AN/GSC-39C SHF satellite terminal, operates the Hydroacoustic Data Acquisition System, and performs on-site maintenance for the remotely operated Air Force HF-GCS terminal.[citation needed]Most agree that something isn't right. Given your location, I hope you are not offended, but observation tells me that all conflicts going on around the world today have the same common denominators ie: USA,UK and obvious others. They are either in the shadows or directly involved. This in turn leads me to believe that UK owned and USA operated base Diego Garcia at the very least, must know something about that plane. Given the equipment at their disposal, is it not therefore a bit suspicious that no information is available? It was even identified as an emergency landing strip for the space shuttle for God's sake! More to this than meets the eye I'm afraid.
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I have never yet flown on a Boeing 777, but waiting for my flight to depart in MAN yesterday there were two loading up at air-bridges just outside my window. I couldn't help contemplating how something so visible and big could simply disappear and/or not be seen by anyone who would report the sighting anywhere over land, let alone how it would not arouse suspicion on radar, even without any signature. My geographical knowledge is reasonably good and so is that of other frequent travellers - you get to know the topography of the regions you fly over - unless there was a very quick fatal or disabling event why did nobody make a phone call if they were aware that the flight path had changed/was changing, or other things like engine sounds, pitch, altitude - whatever? Even in the unimaginable stress of the September 2001 events people managed to call loved ones and even the authorities. I guess I'm saying that if I was conscious and did not have a gun at my head or any other sort of physical restraint I would call someone if my phone had a signal. Everyone is talking about this (my speciality when travelling is to surreptitiously listen in to other people's conversations (once a psychologist, always...)) whether on trains, planes, or buses. I'd quite like some sort of certainty, even if it's any variety of a not nice one because, the reality of "disappearance" just seems incongruous with the incredible emphasis on aviation safety and security. Folks have enough to worry about...and those poor families...

Edited by Spikecollie
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Why are they placing so much emphasis on CCTV coverage of the Captain and his co-pilot going through security? I would have thought this was standard procedure for passengers and crew alike.I think the whole hijack/pirate theory is a non-starter. You cannot land a plane safely on the sea or in dense forests or jungles. If it has landed at an airport then surely, someone could inform the relevant authorities. Or have the perpetrators taken over and are terrorising an entire airport. No...the plane has ditched into the sea or a remote region and I think they will find debris in due course. The search area apparently covers 2,000,000 square miles. That's a huge area to cover.

Reluctantly, I agree, but it's the time delay that's odd (see my post below). Unless everyone was unconscious why did no one phone anyone?

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With everything that is happening politically at the moment, It is hard to evaluate any suggestion without suspicion? 

There's a lovely book by Matt Haig called "The Humans". Before you think I have gone completely mad, I use fiction quite a lot in my real world classes to illustrate points and have had students in cross cultural management programmes read the likes of "The Kite Runner" to help with understanding cross cultural issues. Haig's character is basically an alien who has donned a human guise, but on his first encounter with "The News" decides that it might better be called "The War and Money Show" as that was what he perceived the repetitively main issues to be about. You simply cannot believe what you read, hear, download etc.. Everything is filtered and at least contoured by the issuer. The late Tony Benn, while some of his views were not relevant, had the right degree of suspicion about our "authorities".

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Yes I do, this is going to be the equivalent of madeline mccann, still 7 years later, nothing

its not the same..that was one small kid going missing..a passenger jet airliner full of 240 people is slightly harder to keep hidden (if it has been hidden).

 

if its crashed somewhere on land it could be in some tropical rainforest where no one goes..so that would take ages to locate.

Edited by chubbyfan
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its not the same..that was one small kid going missing..a passenger jet airliner full of 240 people is slightly hardly to keep hidden (if it has been hidden).

 

if its crashed somewhere on land it could be in some tropical rainforest where no one goes..so that would take ages to locate.

Yep. I would guess that if the US military can locate a small missile battery from satellite imagery, then they can locate a Boeing 777. This is effectively one object unless it has broke up (which is why the Air France folks have got involved) Even with a remote crash there has to be some sort of radar signal.

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Yep. I would guess that if the US military can locate a small missile battery from satellite imagery, then they can locate a Boeing 777.

Yet they couldn't see the WMD being transported to Syria as they claimed from Iraq. Actually it's amazing how often these spy satellites go blind when you need them. Anyway no new updates as yet.

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Yet they couldn't see the WMD being transported to Syria as they claimed from Iraq. Actually it's amazing how often these spy satellites go blind when you need them. Anyway no new updates as yet.

Exactement!

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From another forum

A lot of speculation about MH370. Terrorism, hijack, meteors. I cannot believe the analysis on CNN - almost disturbing. I tend to look for a more simple explanation of this event.

Loaded 777 departs midnight from Kuala to Beijing. Hot night. Heavy aircraft. About an hour out across the gulf towards Vietnam the plane goes dark meaning the transponder goes off and secondary radar tracking goes off.

Two days later we hear of reports that Malaysian military radar (which is a primary radar meaning the plane is being tracked by reflection rather than by transponder interrogation response) has tracked the plane on a southwesterly course back across the Malay Peninsula into the straits of Malacca.

When I heard this I immediately brought up Google Earth and I searched for airports in proximity to the track towards southwest.

The left turn is the key here. This was a very experienced senior Captain with 18,000 hours. Maybe some of the younger pilots interviewed on CNN didn't pick up on this left turn. We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Airports behind us, airports abeam us and airports ahead of us. Always in our head. Always. Because if something happens you don't want to be thinking what are you going to do - you already know what you are going to do. Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport. Actually he was taking a direct route to Palau Langkawi a 13,000 foot strip with an approach over water at night with no obstacles. He did not turn back to Kuala Lampur because he knew he had 8,000 foot ridges to cross. He knew the terrain was friendlier towards Langkawi and also a shorter distance.

Take a look on Google Earth at this airport. This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event onboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport.

For me the loss of transponders and communications makes perfect sense if a fire. There was most likely a fire or electrical fire. In the case of fire the first response if to pull all the main busses and restore circuits one by one until you have isolated the bad one.

If they pulled the busses the plane indeed would go silent. It was probably a serious event and they simply were occupied with controlling the plane and trying to fight the fire. Aviate, Navigate and lastly communicate. There are two types of fires. Electrical might not be as fast and furious and there might or might not be incapacitating smoke. However there is the possibility given the timeline that perhaps there was an overheat on one of the front landing gear tires and it blew on takeoff and started slowly burning. Yes this happens with underinflated tires. Remember heavy plane, hot night, sea level, long run takeoff. There was a well known accident in Nigeria of a DC8 that had a landing gear fire on takeoff. A tire fire once going would produce horrific incapacitating smoke. Yes, pilots have access to oxygen masks but this is a no no with fire. Most have access to a smoke hood with a filter but this will only last for a few minutes depending on the smoke level. (I used to carry one of my own in a flight bag and I still carry one in my briefcase today when I fly).

What I think happened is that they were overcome by smoke and the plane just continued on the heading probably on George (autopilot) until either fuel exhaustion or fire destroyed the control surfaces and it crashed. I said four days ago you will find it along that route - looking elsewhere was pointless.

This pilot, as I say, was a hero struggling with an impossible situation trying to get that plane to Langkawi. No doubt in my mind. That's the reason for the turn and direct route. A hijack would not have made that deliberate left turn with a direct heading for Langkawi. It would probably have weaved around a bit until the hijackers decided on where they were taking it.

Surprisingly none of the reporters , officials, other pilots interviewed have looked at this from the pilot's viewpoint. If something went wrong where would he go? Thanks to Google earth I spotted Langkawi in about 30 seconds, zoomed in and saw how long the runway was and I just instinctively knew this pilot knew this airport. He had probably flown there many times. I guess we will eventually find out when you help me spread this theory on the net and some reporters finally take a look on Google earth and put 2 and 2 together. Also a look at the age and number of cycles on those nose tires might give us a good clue too.

Fire in an aircraft demands one thing - you get the machine on the ground as soon as possible. There are two well remembered experiences in my memory. The AirCanada DC9 which landed I believe in Columbus Ohio in the eighties. That pilot delayed descent and bypassed several airports. He didn't instinctively know the closest airports. He got it on the ground eventually but lost 30 odd souls. In the 1998 crash of Swissair DC-10 off Nova Scotia was another example of heroic pilots. They were 15 minutes out of Halifax but the fire simply overcame them and they had to ditch in the ocean. Just ran out of time. That fire incidentally started when the aircraft was about an hour out of Kennedy. Guess what the transponders and communications were shut off as they pulled the busses.

Get on Google Earth and type in Pulau Langkawi and then look at it in relation to the radar track heading. 2+2=4 That for me is the simple explanation why it turned and headed in that direction.

Smart pilot. Just didn't have the time.

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I'm beginning to think the fire hypothesis is best guess. From a pilot:

 

Over water, in the dark with a lot of fuel. Hurtling along through space in a giant aluminum and plastic tube filled with flammable insulation and miles of electrical cables. Everything, with the exception of the engines and flight controls need those pesky electrons. Whether from the batteries or generators or alternators, in older jets. Mr. Murphy shows up. Do you smell something? Yeah, smells like burning wires. Get out the checklist. What does it say? Gang bar and start turning everything off, pull circuit breakers. Now it’s dark and the flashlights are all you’ve got.Captain takes the stick/yoke, FO runs the checklist.

Now you wait. Still smell the smoke? Roger. Batteries back on.Now you get a few things back. Check the voltage. Voltage is normal. Wait. Still smell smoke? Yup. And on through the checklist, trying to isolate the culprit. Worse case scenario: Can’t get the fire out. Everything is gone, no nav, no autopilot, no transponder, no radios and you’re hand flying, battery voltage is dropping. Molten aluminum is raining in the cockpit (Swissair 111) Trying to maintain altitude and heading. Smoke is getting pretty thick, O2 is depleted, she’s trimmed up as good as possible. Cough, cough, now you’re dead. Engines keep running, no one at the controls, now it’s either fire gets to the fuel and BANG, little sparkles fall from the sky, or into the water and maybe a few larger pieces….

 

A longer reasoning

 

https://plus.google.com/app/basic/stream/z13cv1gohsmbv5jmy221vrfyiz3vdhbop04

 

The hijacking/terrorist theories are possible but seem too convoluted and full of holes. Only speculating but in absence of direct evidence of any explanation I'll go with the simpler, more innocent one to these fancy James Bond, Tom Clancy, Hollywoodesque terrorist/hijacking theories.

(hey that's the link ^ to Love Snow's post, didn't see the post)

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