Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
knocker

Todays quiz question

Recommended Posts

Problem with this is bloody Google. Anyway worth a try.

 

We all know the 17th century was renown for it's severe winters (as well as other severe weather around the world).

 

Two artifacts from these years still strikingly reflect the unusually cold climate that prevailed. The first is fairly obvious, the second not quite so. What are they?

 

This could be the shortest thread ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

obviously, even the first one is not obvious......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be slightly clearer think of "Two artifacts" as a whole and don't concentrate on two as in objects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mini Ice Age?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mini Ice Age?

 

That's what it was but is still strikingly represented today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, that is 'Going Dutch' then, is the Dutch war a clue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am proving to be not very good at this :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We show yuletide as a snowy theme?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dickens? (or am I drifting again?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay. the answer to the first is that the abnormal frost, snow and ice gave rise to the popular genre of 'winter landscapes', by Dutch painters: most art galleries possess at least one, and almost all date from the late 17th century.

 

In 1977 the Dienst Verspreide Rijkscollecties, the predecessor of the present-day Instituut Collectie Nederland (The Netherlands Institute for Cultural Heritage), organised a show with the apt title Koud tot op het bot (Bone-chilling cold), an exhibition of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century winter landscapes from its own collection, shown in the Stedelijk Museum Alkmaar, the Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch and the Rijksmuseum Twenthe in Enschede. In this presentation, as well as in the accompanying book, the winter landscape was no longer treated solely as an art-historical phenomenon but also as a record of the way in which people in the sixteenth and seventeenth century looked at and experienced winter.

 

Right a clue for the second answer if anyone''s interested.

 

Think proxies (climate style) and music.

Edited by knocker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Icelandic hip-hop?

 

Definitely not hip-hop. More the start than the end product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think in terms of a proxy from that time that would now be striking in an artifact. The other connection is music.

Edited by knocker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stradivarius violins? I've seen that the tight growth rings on the wood from that time are one of the main reasons for their quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You win the Netweather mars bar Dave. As you say the violins made in the northern Italian city of Cremona display narrow growth rings reflecting the unique succession of cold summers in the mid-seventeen century.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew watching Sky Arts 2 would win me something one day lol!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...