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knocker

Giving to charities

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My post this morning consisted of appeals for donations from five separate charities. One, the RNLI, I always give to when I can anyway.

 

At the moment I donate £20 a month  to two charities, MacMillan Nurses and a children's charity that I can barely afford. I must admit I get a tad angry at the continuous bombardment of appeals, not least because it makes one feel slightly guilty that one doesn't do more.

 

Is this being unreasonable or am I wearing my Victor Meldrew cap again? I admit as I get older I quite enjoy the snug fit of the latter and tend to wear it to bed now instead of a nightcap.

 

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Edited by knocker

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Indeed knocker, we use to donate to charities such as Oxfam and Water Aid, but with the loss of my business and no income we had to cancel these unfortunately. The real problem I have now is the constant bombardment on television of so many charities, some of which should be funded by government anyway, watching TV has become a case of "quick where's the remote".

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The amount of advertising Water Aid bombarded us with over Christmas was abhorrent. On pretty much every single ad break on every channel, the amount of money they splurged on that could have been used for their cause.

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Indeed knocker, we use to donate to charities such as Oxfam and Water Aid, but with the loss of my business and no income we had to cancel these unfortunately. The real problem I have now is the constant bombardment on television of so many charities, some of which should be funded by government anyway, watching TV has become a case of "quick where's the remote".

 

Yes some like MacMillan should definately be funded by government particularly when this is going on. It's a total disgrace.

 

An NHS manager was given a £370,000 redundancy payoff even though he never left the health service, it can be revealed.

 

He is one of three managers paid a total of almost £1 million, despite still working in the NHS, according to figures which have provoked a fresh row about “scandalous†revolving-door payments.

 

Other senior managers were each paid up to £200,000 more than previously admitted by ministers in a mistake that MPs said was staggering.

 

The names appear on a revised list of 36 health chiefs paid a total of £10.2 million when they were made redundant as part of the abolition of 161 organisations under the Government’s NHS reforms.

 

Rob Cooper, a former deputy chief executive at Yorkshire and the Humber Strategic Health Authority, was paid redundancy of between £370,000 and £375,000.

 

Yet by the time the body was abolished he was working as director of finance for South London Healthcare NHS Trust and now works as interim finance director at Barking, Havering and Redbridge University NHS Trust, one of the worst-performing in the country.

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i dont give to charities for causes abroad..charity begins at home..what really got my goat when i was at home this xmas was the number of appeals about giving to help fund schooling in places like India...here is a country that is spending billions on a space programme etc.

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I think the best idea of charity is summed up in "love thy neighbour" - as in the most immediate person to you. A friend, your wife, a co-worker, a stranger. If everyone is charitable to the person next to them it would spread across the world. An exponential chain reaction of charity. So I'd say the saying "charity begins at home" is true.

 

I don't get these people who fly off to help starving children in Africa, I can imagine a situation - as they're stepping into their taxi to take them to the airport an old lady in the house next-door is freezing to death, unable to pay her fuel bills, unable to get proper food, or just lonely... just ignored.

 

And it won't just be the old lady nextdoor, it could be their children or wife who are in need of some charity, or the person across the street, or a few houses down, or a friend in trouble. That to me seems messed up.

Love thy neighbour indeed, that makes sense.

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Well I am three charity baqgs up already this week (one for each day so far) and they bombard the area with them on a regular basis, surely this is not a good use of their funding given so far, I have a bag "full of bags" under the sink, just how much stuff do they think you have to give?

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I belong to an organisation involved in charity both in this country and abroad and tend to limit the majority of my giving to this - I think that before we give away our hard earned loot we should consider, is the cash going to where we intend it to go, or is there somebody earning more money than we could ever dream of creaming a fairly large sum off the top.

 

When giving to overseas charities it is worth bearing in mind that to simply give food aid without any backup is not sustaining and can be self defeating. Many years ago when the Americans did their ill fated good deeds in Somalia, they took loads of food which they were giving away to the locals - result, yes the locals could get fed but the farmers who were there 24/7 were unable to sell a lot of their produce.

 

I always liked the TV advert along the lines of, 'give a man a fish and you fee him for a day; teach him how to fish and he will be able to feed himself and his family for a lifetime.'

 

Some things are very worth while, for instance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_dam they make a great difference to the lives of the peoples where they exist and relatively simple and cheap to construct.

 

Unfortunately there are a lot of rogues in the charity business, so it is up to us all to watch out for these.

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It's an emotive subject close to many's heart. I've worked in the third sector for some years (voluntary and charitable sector) at a grassroots level (frontline work). With the massive changes in commissions from governmental funding over the last few years and the economic downturn, Most charitable Orgs have had to look at their aims and constitutional objectives and re-evaluate their financial longevity. This has in turn seen all local/National/globally known charities taking a different tack to sustain and safeguard their overall turnover.

The large 'corporate charities' turned their attentions to smaller commissions and more targeted funded approaches so they could undercut and run roughshod over smaller, frontline, locally commissioned charitable work. So, the big boys undercutting the smaller independant charities and hoovering up their essential funding, shutting them out and making them redundant. This of course, the total opposite of the governments ' big society aims' - offloading localism accountability onto local communities.

Many of the large corporates also engaged with governmental work fare projects for monetary gain for taking on unemployed people, per placement compulsory under sanction of their benefits....Some such large Charitable Orgs include The Salvation Army, The YMCA, The British Heart Foundation, there are many more examples.

See the link to see how much is spent on the corporate charitable CEO/higher management of such Orgs. Don't get me wrong, if you are a CEO/higher management of such Orgs, yes it needs a high level of experience & comparable wage, but you only have to delve into their charity commission accounts and who are on their 'boards' to understand how money passes from the affluent and connected and not reach the front-line and needy they purport to support.

Don't forget most of these Charities function with support of their Volunteer helpers/work share compulsory placements - only the top end Receive a living and in some cases obscene wage.

http://offlinehbpl.hbpl.co.uk/NewsAttachments/NST/TST_190313_Analysis.pdf

I for one, give (used to give to large advertised charities because it stuck a chord) - now I give to local grassroots independant Orgs (took 20 years volunteering in various capacities to realise all was not well) whose Charitable aims truly plough the Money straight back into the objectives they stand for, otherwise these worthwhile, small projects will go under because they can't compete with those who just smell the money, which will pay the the pension pot of their high end staff in the longer term. This at some point, as with many charities, will become unsustainable.

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