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Have you turned your central heating on yet ?


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I am surprised at how many refuse to have heating on when it is very cold - not on until ice days etc.

 

I will not be putting mine for a while yet, but during winter it needs to be on to prevent damp especially when drying clothes (a de-humidifier is a must).

 

I would be interested to know if its a financial thing or some people just don't feel the cold

 

I notice the cold far more then I use to, maybe its because I have 'slowed down'. I don't get home and do 100 press ups now days.

 

I feel its chilly now, perhaps if I type faster I will warm up ?

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I would be interested to know if its a financial thing or some people just don't feel the cold

 

I notice the cold far more then I use to, maybe its because I have 'slowed down'. I don't get home and do 100 press ups now days.

 

I feel its chilly now, perhaps if I type faster I will warm up ?

 

It's all about manning up and being a hard fella Posted Image

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It's all about manning up and being a hard fella Posted Image

 

As long as we can say the same to them complaining once it gets above room temperature outside :lol:

 

12.6c outside now - feels very chilly and no desire whatsoever to linger outside unlike just only half a week ago. House is 19.6c after cooking dinner but think once we've been sat here an hour we're going to feel chilly. Hot tea helps albeit briefly!

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As long as we can say the same to them complaining once it gets above room temperature outside Posted Image

To be fair, most people in the UK do not have summer's central heating equivalent - air conditioning, so have to make do with simply opening the windows, which is often ineffective on calm days. Granted, our summers are not hot by any means (not that our winters are very cold..), but that doesn't mean it cannot get uncomfortably warm indoors, especially in buildings that are designed to retain heat rather than let it escape. This is also the case in Scandinavia, where buildings are designed to trap heat in and not let it out, so A/C would be very useful there even if summers are not hot.

Edited by cheese
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The heating side of our combi boiler is 'off' so it won't come on regardless of the thermostat. I'm not so stingy with the heating just 'cos I'm a mean and belligerent sod ( although there is some truth in that!) but because there are very practical steps to keeping warm instead of the easy, outrageously expensive and unneccesary step of putting the heating on. Especially when it isn't cold by any stretch of the imagination and would only serve to make me uncomfortably hot. And yep I am indeed sat here in a t-shirt and have the windows open! Today is boiling, man!!

You know you are talking to a born-and-bred Yorkshireman when you hear words like 'outrageously expensive' and 'unneccesary step of putting the heating on'! I personally like to set the thermostat at 19c and timer set for 6am to 10pm. The heating won't be needed just yet though, maybe early October. I don't worry for the cost as it's fairly reasonable at 19c. Bedrooms are probably a bit cooler than that, maybe 17c. Warm enough for comfort and to keep the house dry and healthy.
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mine's 12 inches....

 

(In house Site team gag....lol)

I bet Long Dong Silver hasn't turned his heating on yet!Posted Image 

 

Edit: 10 foot...actually, that was my brother, Billy...

Edited by A Boy Named Sue
How remiss.
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You know you are talking to a born-and-bred Yorkshireman when you hear words like 'outrageously expensive' and 'unneccesary step of putting the heating on'! I personally like to set the thermostat at 19c and timer set for 6am to 10pm. The heating won't be needed just yet though, maybe early October. I don't worry for the cost as it's fairly reasonable at 19c. Bedrooms are probably a bit cooler than that, maybe 17c. Warm enough for comfort and to keep the house dry and healthy.

 

I fear for the future - my missus feels the cold easily, and her mother's thermostat is permanently set at 30C. She walks around exhibiting occasional shivers at the height of a July heatwave, muttering that it's dropped cold, has someone been fiddling with the thermostat etc. If it's a hereditary thing, I'm screwed.

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Given my thermostat is set at 15-16c there really wouldn't be much point in putting my heating on yet!As I rule, I wait until I feel cold whilst sat around wearing just a fleece top.  So ~12c   That normally only occurs after a run of air frosts.  And then usually only for an hour or two in the morning before I get dressed .....

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I fear for the future - my missus feels the cold easily, and her mother's thermostat is permanently set at 30C. She walks around exhibiting occasional shivers at the height of a July heatwave, muttering that it's dropped cold, has someone been fiddling with the thermostat etc. If it's a hereditary thing, I'm screwed.

Sounds like she's Scottish. I hate going to Scotland in winter - every single (public) building (shops, pubs, hostels etc) is stifflingly hot, regardless of the outside temp.  I'm sure Scots think that if exposed to temps below 25c in winter they'll drop dead ....

Edited by Essan
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19.5c in here and no heating on yet (although we both just had hot showers to compensate!).

I normally heat to 21c but that's only when its colder outside. 

I've always found temps 19-20c in the house actually feels better when naturally occurring than they do if you choose to heat to that level. If it were 0c out and I heated to 19.5c it'd still feel chilly whereas it doesn't feel too bad at the moment.

Think its to do with draughts being created by rapid heat loss from the house vs the heat from the radiators. Also the variance of the heating system - I mean it doesn't hold 21c bang on - it goes up and down, and on the cooling part of the cycle your body picks up the incoming chill...

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I've always found temps 19-20c in the house actually feels better when naturally occurring than they do if you choose to heat to that level. If it were 0c out and I heated to 19.5c it'd still feel chilly whereas it doesn't feel too bad at the moment.

I find 'natural' temps of 18-20c in the house as quite tolerable, whereas if it were -10c outside and the house was heated to 20c I'd find it much too warm and need to open the windows ......

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We've got the radiators on plus the big fire in the front room. I don't recall having to turn the heating on so early in the autumn before, and this was after having it on very late into spring (late May): consequently it's such a short gap between the last time having it on in spring and the first time having it on in autumn, and it's somewhat ironic that the summer was pretty warm and I've been in shorts most days since the beginning of July.

 

It must be the shock of the rather abrupt transition from a generally warm pattern to a proper autumnal one with distinctly chilly mornings, as these temperatures would still be very mild in winter and if anything would facilitate turning the heating off rather than on.

Edited by AderynCoch
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I would be interested to know if its a financial thing or some people just don't feel the cold I notice the cold far more then I use to, maybe its because I have 'slowed down'. I don't get home and do 100 press ups now days. I feel its chilly now, perhaps if I type faster I will warm up ?

Bit of both I suspect. For me I'm 24 and a Scottish Yorkshire man who melts in anything above 20C. As I like the cold the extent of heating in the winter for me is to keep a coat on during day or keep my underwear on at night. I was briefly tempted by the heating in late Jan last winter.
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Sounds like she's Scottish. I hate going to Scotland in winter - every single (public) building (shops, pubs, hostels etc) is stifflingly hot, regardless of the outside temp.  I'm sure Scots think that if exposed to temps below 25c in winter they'll drop dead ....

 

You'd think the Scots would handle the cold better than us lot. But no, as far as I'm aware the ma-in-law has no haggis-muncher's blood in her...

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The missus has put the gas fire on for 20 mins this morning to help her thaw out a bit before heading to work. Only warmed it by about 0.4c in here but certainly helps!

 

Sandals now exchanged for slippers as my feet were freezing - annoying as sandals are outdoor/damp kitchen floor suited unlike the slippers... Back to frequently changing footwear/ruining slippers due to laziness again... Another step towards the awkwardness of winter!

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The missus has put the gas fire on for 20 mins this morning to help her thaw out a bit before heading to work. Only warmed it by about 0.4c in here but certainly helps!

 

Sandals now exchanged for slippers as my feet were freezing - annoying as sandals are outdoor/damp kitchen floor suited unlike the slippers... Back to frequently changing footwear/ruining slippers due to laziness again... Another step towards the awkwardness of winter!

 

You could just keep a pair of old slip on shoes by the back door?

 

I know winter can be a bit awkward, but you seem to make it worse for yourself Posted Image

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Just been sat on my back doorstep for the last hour and a half, stripping this year's collossal hop harvest off the bines - in me jeans an' t-shirt. I can confirm that it ain't remotely chilly, never mind cold.

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You could just keep a pair of old slip on shoes by the back door?

 

I know winter can be a bit awkward, but you seem to make it worse for yourself Posted Image

 

Oh I do have some hardened outdoor shoes right next to the door - so yes good for outdoors but no good for the kitchen unless you want a muddy kitchen. I know its easy to slip off one set of shoes and put on another but do it five times during post dinner clear up you soon get fed up of it! Or as I do - say 'bugger it' and run to the bin one last time in your slippers... oh **** they're wet!

 

Another creeping annoyance - the front gate is now beginning to stiffen up making it harder & harder to open and close. In summer it opens with zero effort, back last winter we practically had to throw our entire weight against it to open it. 

 

I know all these things (and the many more to come) are tiny in the grand scheme of things but they just stack up and make the winter period require a lot more effort and indeed money coupled with a lot less comfort & ease.

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Oh I do have some hardened outdoor shoes right next to the door - so yes good for outdoors but no good for the kitchen unless you want a muddy kitchen. I know its easy to slip off one set of shoes and put on another but do it five times during post dinner clear up you soon get fed up of it! Or as I do - say 'bugger it' and run to the bin one last time in your slippers... oh **** they're wet!

 

Another creeping annoyance - the front gate is now beginning to stiffen up making it harder & harder to open and close. In summer it opens with zero effort, back last winter we practically had to throw our entire weight against it to open it. 

 

I know all these things (and the many more to come) are tiny in the grand scheme of things but they just stack up and make the winter period require a lot more effort and indeed money coupled with a lot less comfort & ease.

 

That puts the whole Syria thing into perspective.Posted Image

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