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Hi
 
As a follow up to the CRUTEM4 data that I posted about yesterday, I have put together a chart and table of the Ben Nevis observatory observations that are included in that data set from the year 1884 to 1903. I have also included a comparison chart for Fort William, and added a plotted SYNOP grid for Cairngorm from this January.
 
As always you can find it along with a lot of other interesting and diverse stuff to do with all things meteorological on my blog:
 
 
Bruce.
post-16956-0-71497800-1376408750_thumb.p

 

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Thanks for the info, I sometimes wish the Ben Nevis Observatory was still there... Would of loved to of worked and lived there during the winters.

Edited by Polar Maritime
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Thanks for that. I suspect that the winter minima recorded up there won't be as low as at lower valley sites like Braemar and Altnaharra, but that the wind chill is significantly more severe.

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Thanks for the info, I sometimes wish the Ben Nevis Observatory was still there... Would of loved to of worked and lived there during the winters.

 

not for me, the wind would be too unpleasant with the low temperatures, I'll stick to the Alps thanks, no mountain railway either!

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Thanks for the info, I sometimes wish the Ben Nevis Observatory was still there... Would of loved to of worked and lived there during the winters.

Me too.  Though perhaps only for one season. There's only so much freezing clag one can take!

'Inclement' Wragge climbed the Ben every day for years taking observations, before the 'hotel' was built on the summit - not sure I'd have been so keen on that.

 

http://www.meteohistory.org/2004polling_preprints/docs/abstracts/roy2_poster.pdf

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not for me, the wind would be too unpleasant with the low temperatures, I'll stick to the Alps thanks, no mountain railway either!

 

 In "perfect" conditions Scotlands mountain ranges are very much akin to the Alps.

 

Edited by Polar Maritime
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 In "perfect" conditions Scotlands mountain ranges are very much akin to the Alps.

 

 

loved the film but I hate exposure let alone running up and down the bloody edges-nuts you are mate, but this probably explains to others, and there I thought you quite sane when you showed yourself and partner skiing on the last bits of snow!

 

Off up Snowdon later tonight up Pyg track and down Crib Goch via North Ridge to watch the sun rise in the morning.

 

To be honest I envy you and anyone who can enjoy exposure on ridges etc.

Edited by johnholmes
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I've a great book somewhere amongst  the tip I call storage, it's all about Scottish Winter Mountains and the  Ben's  weather station observations are all there in black and white. Now if only I can find the damn book and remember the authors name.Posted Image

Edited by Sceptical Inquirer
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not for me, the wind would be too unpleasant with the low temperatures, I'll stick to the Alps thanks, no mountain railway either!

 

An account of the January 1884 storm on Ben Nevis which was particularly remarkable for the low pressure recorded, from the journal Weather - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wea.20/pdf

 

 

The Ben Nevis Summit Observatory (Roy 1983, 2004) was in operation during this storm, and features of the weather observed there may be of interest – this account has been taken from Marriott (1884). The observed pressure – corrected for temperature – at station level, 1343m, fell from 813.8mbar at noon to 784.7mbar at 2030, the lowest point reached. This was only 6 mbar above the lowest point on the scale although the instrument had been especially constructed for the Observatory. By midnight it had risen to 790.0mbar. The sea-level pressure at Fort William, only 7km away, was 930.1mbar at 2030. At noon on the summit of Ben Nevis the temperature was –9.2°C: but thereafter no outdoor observations were possible until 22h owing to the fury of the gale. At noon the wind was south-east, 60 knots: during the afternoon it increased to above 80 knots. At 19h it was south-east 65knots, at 20 h south-east 55knots, but at 21h calm: the depression must have passed very close to the observatory. At 22h it was east-north easterly, 27 knots. Snow, fog and severe drifting were noted all day. Marriott gives the following description of an eventful day in the observatory:

“In connection with the thermometer readings, it may be mentioned that at 13h Mr Omond made an attempt to get at the screen. Tying a rope round his waist, the end of which was held by an assistant within the porch, Mr Omond crept cautiously out from the shelter of the Observatory; but so great was the violence of the gale that he could make no headway against it, and was glad to return. At 19 h another attempt was made. The observers got as far as the screen, but found it impossible to read the thermometers owing to the blinding drift lashing in their faces. At 22 h it was calm enough for Mr Omond to go out alone, and the reading of 22.8°F [–5.1°C] was obtained.
Edited by Interitus
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wow, dedication to duty, I did weather observations with UK Met for 18 years but thankfully never anything even remotely like that, -3C and 20-30kt gusting 40kt  in falling and drifting snow was the worst I ever reported.

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