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mike Meehan

Watch your Language!

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Since the topic, 'Most Concerning Data' developed into a discussion about minority languages and became locked I thought this would give a chance for those interested to expound and expand on their their views re languages, dialects and the origins of words etc - in fact anything language and communication related.

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Did you know...the word SLANG is derived from two words....S/ecret Lang/uage. :)

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Did you know...the word SLANG is derived from two words....S/ecret Lang/uage. :)

That's something I never heard of before but now you come to mention it, it makes sense.

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Seems now that regional accents more celebrated than in past, Although people still take the Michael out of my broad brummy accent,

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I don't think it is true, but I remember someone telling me that the word NEWS is derived from the first letter of north,east,west,south

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Seems now that regional accents more celebrated than in past, Although people still take the Michael out of my broad brummy accent,

Bloody 'ell - I was born at Lichfield and lived there until I was about 7 years - it took me years to get rid of that accent - it was helped by moving about a bit so I ended up with a mongrel accent - however I still speak using flat vowels and refuse to compromise - a bath is bath not a bloody barth :)

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Bloody 'ell - I was born at Lichfield and lived there until I was about 7 years - it took me years to get rid of that accent - it was helped by moving about a bit so I ended up with a mongrel accent - however I still speak using flat vowels and refuse to compromise - a bath is bath not a bloody barth smile.png

I moved from the west of Scotland to the Borders about a year ago, and am finding the different accents and language very interesting. This is helped by the fact that Mrs Catch is originally from Sheffield so has a very mongrel accent, plus I work alongside Mrs Catch's mum who is still very much Sheffield and hasn't picked up much of a Scottish twang.

My favourite Borders word so far (not sure of spelling, or even if it is a Borders word) is "hoy" or "hoi". This is used at work quite a lot, it means something between to throw and to place. So if you've got a box of stock to put somewhere someone might say "just hoy it on there". I'd never heard it before I moved down here so I'm not sure of the origin, it could be derived from hoist.

I also quite like the use of "yin" instead of one in the Borders, this is used in the west of Scotland but never to replace the numeric number one as it is in the Borders. So someone in the Borders would go into a shop and ask for "yin" of something, whereas someone in the west of Scotland would ask for "wan" of something; both may refer to Billy Connolly as "the big yin" though.

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I still go to the Ospickle not Hospital, Old brummie with attitude

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I were at ospidle jus las week.Not fer me but fer er indooors...

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For a time, as a child, I was living in South Derbyshire with my grand parents - we used to call dandelions 'wet the beds' for obvious reasons but I have not found this term used much in other parts of the country - however some years ago I learned that the Southern French equivalent of 'pushing up daisies' is 'mange les p1ssenlits par les racines' - sorry had to put an '1' instead of an 'i' because it ended up as a left trouser leg.

For those who do not know French, the first syllible means the same as in English and 'en lit' means 'in bed' - the same idea in two different languages, however with being close to Ashby de la Zouch, which must have had strong French connections to get the name, so it is possible that the idea remained and got translated into Engllish.

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