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25th Anniversary Of The October 1987 Storm

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http://www.see.leeds.ac.uk/research/yorkshire-centre-of-the-royal-meteorological-society/

An open talk at School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds.

Wherein Prof Browning will discuss the role of the 'Sting Jet' in the Oct'87 storm and report on the latest research into the role of mesoscale jets in the damaging 3 Jan 2012 windstorm.

Well worth a few hours of your time if you're in the area,

David

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We are also marking the 50th anniversary of the greatest windstorm in modern times around the west coast, known in the Pacific northwest U.S. states as the "Columbus Day" storm and in the Vancouver area of B.C. Canada as "Freda" (some call it typhoon, some hurricane, the confusion being based on which family the storm developed in, west or central Pacific). The reference cited below calls it Typhoon Freda. This storm hit the U.S. regions late on October 12, 1962 and reached B.C. around midnight (12-13 Oct).

http://docs.lib.noaa...094-02-0105.pdf

The dynamics appear very similar to the October 1987 storm applied to a more complex topography, the parallel mountain ranges near the west coast. As you can see from the reference, there was massive wind damage especially to the huge trees that grow in this region. Besides what you can read in the reference, there was a large-scale blowdown of large trees in Vancouver's Stanley Park.

From the weather records of Environment Canada, I found a report of a maximum wind gust of 126 km/hr from 160 deg at YVR, probably recorded around midnight to 0100h as the low centre (by then about 965-970 mbs) passed just west of Victoria BC.

While that is a relatively high value, gusts to 200 km/hr were implied by the damage done in Stanley Park which must have been better exposed to the gradient wind blowing out of Puget Sound.

Edited by Roger J Smith

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http://www.see.leeds...ogical-society/

An open talk at School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds.

Wherein Prof Browning will discuss the role of the 'Sting Jet' in the Oct'87 storm and report on the latest research into the role of mesoscale jets in the damaging 3 Jan 2012 windstorm.

Well worth a few hours of your time if you're in the area,

David

A reminder...

Results from a reanalysis simulation of the October 87 storm:

Out-going Long-wave Radiation (cloud top brightness temperature) at 18 UTC 15 October 1987, windspeed at 850 hPa.

OLR and wspd 850 hPa at 02 UTC 16 October. The area of winds > 50 m/s over SE England is the Sting Jet.

Diagnosed 10m gusts 02 UTC 16 October.

David

post-10560-0-15949400-1350299896_thumb.j

post-10560-0-36588100-1350299923_thumb.j

post-10560-0-52805200-1350299935_thumb.j

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As I lived in York at the time, I didn't experience it; but I've got the docu-dramas (on video) from the 10th and 20th anniversaries. We did, however have a very heavy wind and TStorm in February 1990 (I think) which was strong enough to fell a 200 years old tree where I worked at the time.

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We are also marking the 50th anniversary of the greatest windstorm in modern times around the west coast, known in the Pacific northwest U.S. states as the "Columbus Day" storm and in the Vancouver area of B.C. Canada as "Freda" (some call it typhoon, some hurricane, the confusion being based on which family the storm developed in, west or central Pacific). The reference cited below calls it Typhoon Freda. This storm hit the U.S. regions late on October 12, 1962 and reached B.C. around midnight (12-13 Oct).

http://docs.lib.noaa...094-02-0105.pdf

The dynamics appear very similar to the October 1987 storm applied to a more complex topography, the parallel mountain ranges near the west coast. As you can see from the reference, there was massive wind damage especially to the huge trees that grow in this region. Besides what you can read in the reference, there was a large-scale blowdown of large trees in Vancouver's Stanley Park.

From the weather records of Environment Canada, I found a report of a maximum wind gust of 126 km/hr from 160 deg at YVR, probably recorded around midnight to 0100h as the low centre (by then about 965-970 mbs) passed just west of Victoria BC.

While that is a relatively high value, gusts to 200 km/hr were implied by the damage done in Stanley Park which must have been better exposed to the gradient wind blowing out of Puget Sound.

Yes, this is a very interesting storm which appears to be in the extreme category (on landfall) as October '87.

David

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Hello folks,

To commemorate the 1987 Storm on the night of the 15th/16th October I've done a historic video looking at the synoptics that caused this mega storm event;

lhttp://www.gavsweath...istorical2.html

Also starts with a little cameo from a certain Michael Fish rofl.gif

Enjoy biggrin.png

Edited by Gavin P

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I've never really grasped fully why the storm of '87 has become so famous to deserve the title 'Great Storm', this isn't the most powerful storm to hit our shores, for example - less than three years later the UK was struck by the 'Burns Day Storm' on the 26th January 1990 with a central pressure of 949mb - this event was more fatal (time of day) and caused more extensive and costly damage compared with the October '87 storm - Still a very significant event in UK weather history without a doubt.

Edited by Liam J

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I've never really grasped fully why the storm of '87 has become so famous to deserve the title 'Great Storm', this isn't the most powerful storm to hit our shores, for example - less than three years later the UK was struck by the 'Burns Day Storm' on the 26th January 1990 with a central pressure of 949mb - this event was more fatal (time of day) and caused more extensive and costly damage compared with the October '87 storm - Still a very significant event in UK weather history without a doubt.

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